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Thread: The Arman Building - 482 Greenwich Street - Condo - by McKay Architecture

  1. #1
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    Default The Arman Building - 482 Greenwich Street - Condo - by McKay Architecture

    From http://cityrealty.com:

    New Canal Street project 22-JUL-05

    Red Brick Canal LLC and Armand P. Arman have applied to the Board of Standards & Appeals for variance to permit the construction of an 11-story residential building at 482 Greenwich Street.

    The site is an irregular lot on the northwest corner at Canal Street at the edge of the historic shoreline within a high hazard flood plane and on the former site of a gas station.

    The developers want to demolish an existing garage and build 26 feet two inches above the street wall limit of 85 feet along Canal Street. The proposed building would have a floor-to-area ratio of 7.98 but the maximum permited in this district is 6.02. A recent rezoning of the Hudson Square district downzoned much of the district but this block was slightly "upzoned."

    Community Board 2 last night passed a resolution that "strongly opposed" an increase in bulk over a FAR of 6.02, but agreed that the developers has "a valid hardship sufficient to justify an increase in lot coverage."

  2. #2

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    You are right, that's the corner diagonally across Canal Street.

    The site of 482 Greenwich Street. 30 July 2005.


  3. #3

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    What is this obsession with capping height? That lot could gracefully accommodate its footprint projected to twenty stories or more in height. Some older adjacent buildings are already taller than the propoal, and the whole area has a sense of desolation at least partly due to lack of streetwall height and closure.

    Does the "community" prefer the razor wire, graffiti and billboard that presently reign?

  4. #4

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    City says Arman project’s hardship claim may be creative


    Diagram of the proposed Arman Building at Canal and Greenwich Sts.

    By Chad Smith

    The city’s Board of Standards and Appeals expressed skepticism on Tuesday about the economic hardship claim submitted for the soon-to-be Arman building at 482 Greenwich St.

    Meenakshi Srinivasan, chairperson of the B.S.A., had particular qualms with the quoted cost of construction material. The cost, she said, with a hint of sarcasm, might have been “slightly exaggerated,” and she asked for a resubmission.

    The builders need to prove an economic hardship in order to get a variance to surpass their eight-story zoning limit and build 11 floors. The only way to turn a profit, builders argue, is by constructing to those heights.

    Architects from Thomas McKay, the firm working with the developer, Red Brick L.L.C., also tried to prove hardship by drawing attention to the irregular shape of the building’s space on the corner of Greenwich and Canal Sts. The architects say that the irregularly shaped triangular space will cost much more to build on.

    When asked by the board whether he had considered how the building would affect the community, one of the developer’s architects said that he “knew it wouldn’t have an adverse one, because the five similar buildings that have recently gone up in the area are doing fine.”

    The B.S.A. over the last few years has granted several zoning variances to Hudson Square developers, who used them to build tall condos close to the Arman project. The variances prompted the City Planning Commission to change the neighborhood’s zoning two years ago to allow for residential uses and set less strict height limits.

    Community members Tuesday said that the Arman space was never suitable for a tall building, anyhow.

    “The developer is simply wanting to impose more on this lot than it can handle,” said Richard Barrett, an architect who spoke on behalf of the local residents and building owners against a taller construction.

    The only two of the five B.S.A. commissioners to speak on the matter, Srinivasan and James Chin, both were skeptical of the developer’s economic case, questioned the size of the building and the need for terraces.

    Tuesday’s developments were just another strain in the already taut relationship between community and builders on Greenwich St. It all started over a year ago, when Red Brick Canal approached the acclaimed sculptor Arman with the hopes of purchasing his land and building a residence that bore his name. Arman, who died in October, bought the property in 1977, and its value has since soared.

    The building will be designed in the spirit of the artist’s work, with an Arman sculpture facing the corner on Canal. Although those who knew the artist are not arguing with the aesthetics of the design, Arman “didn’t want the building to be so high,” according to Victoria Faust, who has lived on Canal St. for 30 years. The sculptor was alive when the plan was first submitted and never opposed it publicly.

    The battle continues as the board will reconvene to hear the case on March 7.

    Downtown Express is published by
    Community Media LLC.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by ablarc
    What is this obsession with capping height? That lot could gracefully accommodate its footprint projected to twenty stories or more in height. Some older adjacent buildings are already taller than the propoal, and the whole area has a sense of desolation at least partly due to lack of streetwall height and closure.

    Does the "community" prefer the razor wire, graffiti and billboard that presently reign?
    Good point. That site is horrible and disgusting. The proposed project will be a very nice addition to the area.

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    From http://cityrealty.com:

    Arman's Greenwich Street project debated 25-JAN-06

    The Board of Standards & Appeals held its first hearing last evening on an application for variances to permit the construction of a handsome, 11-story residential condominium building at 482 Greenwich Street on the northwest corner at Canal Street.

    Red Brick Canal LLC is the developer. It had acquired the site from Arman, the artist who recently died and had maintained an outdoor studio on an irregular, triangular-shaped lot at the address.

    The project is seeking to increase the permissible floor-to-area ratio (F.A.R.) from 6.02 to 7.98, get permission for 100 percent lot coverage because only 80 percent is now allowed, and increase the street-wall height from the permissible 85 feet on Canal Street to about 111 feet. The F.A.R. is a formula that computes the ratio of allowable indoor square footage to the building's footprint square footage.

    Thomas McKay and Garrett Gourlay are the architects for the project that will employ a synthetic light-colored material as piers on Canal Street, where its height will match that of an adjoining red-brick building to the west, and a glass façade with inset balconies on the east façade on Greenwich Street.

    Much of last night’s hearing centered on the developer’s “hardship” problems relating to irregular lot size, noise and air pollution, and contaminated soil conditions.

    Deirdre Carlson of Greenberg Traurig, who was representing the developer, said that the project’s proximity to heavy traffic requires triple glazing of the windows and the need to bring fresh air for air-conditioning from the roof. She said that the building’s sellable square foot “efficiency was only 63 percent.”

    Construction costs, she added, have climbed about 10 percent in the last year. James Chin, one of the board’s commissioners, noted, however, that construction costs have recently stabilized. Mr. Chin also queried that if air pollution was a problem then why have terraces. A member of the developer’s team replied that rush hour traffic was not constant.

    David Reck, the chairman of the zoning committee of Community Board 2, testified that Community Board 2 strongly supports the Hudson Square rezoning, which included this site, and felt that that the project did have some hardships that justified changes in lot coverage, but not in bluk. He also noted that the area’s “building boom has created a partking regulation hangover that needs to be upgraded.”

    In her remarks, Meenakshi Srinivasan, the chairperson of the board, suggested that perhaps the developer should raise his asking prices, enclose the balconies, and strive to keep the F.A.R. to the permitted 6.02, which might permit taller ceilings. She scheduled a continuance of the hearing for March 7.

    Mr. Mckay said that the project would have a large-scale work by Arman, the only one in the city.

    Arman was born as Armand Fernandez in 1928 in Nice, France. In 1947, he met Yves Klein with whom he hitchhiked in Europe. In 1951, he taught at the Bushido Kai Judo School and then served as a medical orderly in the Indo-Chinese War. Influenced by a Kurt Schwitters exhibition in 1954. he began working with stamp ink-pads, in part to critic Abstract Expressionism and in a few years was throwing ink objects at canvases. In 1958 he dropped the "d" in his name, inspired by a printer's error. He proceeded to explore the use of many different materials in her art and assemblages, including rubbish and burnt objects and sliced and smashed objects and organic garbage. In 1964 he had his first museum retrospectives at the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, and at the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam.


  7. #7
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    The buildings along Canal St. near this site are 10+ stories.

    It seems the developer has made a good attempt to bring the height down on the side street elevation to coincide with the shorter structures there.

    I live downtown, but am kind of stymied to figure out who is objecting to this and why, especially considering what is going up on Varick, Spring, Greenwich & Hudson.

  8. #8

    Default Facts

    The height limit in this district is 120 feet - not eight stories.

    The building simply blocks the views of some of the neighbors and an illegal sign on the lot line of the building next door. That is the opposition to the building.

    City Planning recently rezoned the area but failed to account for some truly unique sites that don't work as a standard development under the new zoning district and thus require a variance from the BSA.

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    Here is the latest...

    Board of Standards & Appeals holds 2nd hearing on 482 Greenwich Street


    25-APR-06

    The Board of Standards & Appeals held its second hearing this afternoon on an application for variances to permit the construction of an 11-story residential building at 482 Greenwich Street on the northwest corner at Canal Street.

    Red Brick Canal LLC is the developer. It had acquired the site from Arman, the artist who recently died and had maintained an outdoor studio on an irregular, triangular-shaped lot at the address.

    Thomas McKay and Garrett Gourlay are the architects for the project that will employ a synthetic light-colored material as piers on Canal Street, where its height will match that of an adjoining red-brick building to the west, and a glass façade with inset balconies on the east façade on Greenwich Street.

    The discussion centered mostly on “hardship” issues and Bill McCorkin, a cost consultant, told the board that mandated acoustic insulation requires that the project’s triple-glazed windows have more space between the glass. Mr. Gourlay told the board that the building will only have glazing on 40 percent of its facades. He also said that proximity to the Holland Tunnel and soil conditions will require expensive caissons and that its irregularly shaped lot also presented economic hardships to the developer. He said that the project has a “75 percent efficient floor plate” while larger sites can attain 85 percent efficiency.

    Some residents of nearby buildings testified that the area “is a great market for residential projects,” noting that this project has 100 feet of river views and faces a small park.

    Richard Barrett of the TriBeCa Community Association of the Canal West Coalition told the board that there should be legislation to follow up on developers’ “rate of return,” adding that sometimes it is stated at 6 percent and turns out to be closer to 600.

    A resident at 497 Greenwich Street, a new project nearby, challenged assumptions that pricing at 482 Greenwich Street might be about $1,000 a square feet and suggested that a probable range might be $1,300 to $1,800 per square foot for lower floors and $2,500 for upper floors.

    Meenakshi Srinvasan, the chairperson of the board, asked the applicant to provide more details of its costs and comparable values and continued the hearing to June 20.

    Mr. Mckay has indicated that the project would have a large-scale work by Arman, the only one in the city.

    Arman was born as Armand Fernandez in 1928 in Nice, France. In 1947, he met Yves Klein with whom he hitchhiked in Europe. In 1951, he taught at the Bushido Kai Judo School and then served as a medical orderly in the Indo-Chinese War. Influenced by a Kurt Schwitters exhibition in 1954. he began working with stamp ink-pads, in part to critic Abstract Expressionism and in a few years was throwing ink objects at canvases. In 1958 he dropped the "d" in his name, inspired by a printer's error. He proceeded to explore the use of many different materials in her art and assemblages, including rubbish and burnt objects and sliced and smashed objects and organic garbage. In 1964 he had his first museum retrospectives at the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, and at the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam.


    Copyright © 1994-2006 CITY REALTY

  10. #10

    Default 497 Greenwich

    Hard for me to tell but does 497 Greenwich lose some views with this building going up? Maybe a few of the units may have a diagonal view to the river through this lot? Otherwise I really do not see why there is any real opposition. That lot is an eyesore right now.

  11. #11

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    http://www.downtownexpress.com/

    Arman developer: Bulk is down, sculpture going up



    By Albert Amateau

    The developer of the vacant Hudson Sq. lot where the late sculptor Arman turned scrap metal into art has decided to scale down its application for a residential project that exceeds the neighborhood’s zoning.

    Red Brick Canal L.L.C. told the Board of Standards and Appeals on July 26 that it has revised plans for the triangular lot at 482 Greenwich St., at the northwest corner of Canal St. to conform to current land use rules governing the size of buildings. The building will still be 11 stories and 120 feet tall.

    For the past year, Red Brick had been asking the B.S.A. to permit a building with a floor-to-area ratio (F.A.R.) of 7.98 instead of the 6.02 F.A.R. allowed under zoning that was liberalized in 2003. F.A.R. refers to the enclosed floor area of a project in relation to the area of the building lot.

    The project is to include a 40-ft. tall brass sculpture by the internationally renowned sculptor, Arman, who died last year. David Slaven, a Red Brick partner, described the work, planned for the Canal St. façade of the project, as representing an assemblage of cello parts. The sculptor had agreed to sell the building to Red Brick and remained involved in the development until his death.

    Canal West, a neighborhood civic group, has been opposing Red Brick’s application for a bigger building, insisting that the developer play by the same rules that governed other neighborhood projects. At an April hearing, B.S.A. chairperson Meenakshi Srinivasan, indicated the agency was reluctant to grant more floor area than zoning allows.

    Red Brick took the hint but also took advantage of a land-use provision that automatically increases the project’s F.A.R. from 6.02 to 6.5 by including a 415 sq. ft. community facility space on the ground floor of the Canal St. side of the building.

    A Canal West member, Kate Koster, said this week that the group was grateful that the B.S.A. turned back the first proposal, but she was skeptical about the community facility bonus.

    “Those so-called community spaces often end up being locked and not available to the community,” Koster said. “We would be much happier with a 6.02 F.A.R.,” she added.

    Filippo Mancia, president of the condo board at 497 Greenwich St. and a member of Canal West, characterized Red Brick’s community facility proposal as “a desperate grab for more floor area.” He estimated the addition of a 415 sq. ft. space would allow Red Brick to add more than 1,000 sq. ft. to the project.

    Regarding the Arman Building’s community facility space, Slaven said, “We haven’t signed anyone yet, but ideally it will be a non-profit arts group.”

    Although the new plan conforms to existing floor-area ratio, Red Brick is still seeking a B.S.A. variances to allow the project to cover 98 percent of the triangular lot instead of the 80 percent allowed by zoning rules. Red Brick also wants a variance to allow a curb cut to a ground level parking garage on Greenwich St.

    In previous hearings, B.S.A.’s Srinivasan said she was not concerned with the lot coverage or parking issues but she was reluctant to grant a variance for a bigger building.

    The B.S.A. may grant variances if developers prove they have a hardship because they cannot make a reasonable return on their investment by building a project as of right under exiting zoning rules.

    Red Brick Canal has cited the high cost of building on an irregular-shaped lot, and the need for a special foundation for a project on a site above the westbound tube of the Holland Tunnel.

    Although the B.S.A. closed the hearing on the project in April, the record was left open for written documents until Aug. 15. In view of Red Brick’s new proposal, it is also possible that the agency could reopen the hearing.

    Albert@DowntownExpress.com

    Downtown Express is published by
    Community Media LLC.
    145 Sixth Avenue, New York, NY 10013


    An unrelated note: Up the street at Spring, the developer is doing the right thing - restoring the roof cornice.

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    From http://cityrealty.com/new_developments:

    Arman project at 482 Greenwich Street approved 13-SEP-06



    The Board of Standards & Appeals yesterday approved the granting of a zoning variance to permit the construction of an 11-story residential building at 482 Greenwich Street on the northwest corner at Canal Street.

    Red Brick Canal LLC. of which David Slaven is the president, is the developer. It had acquired the site from Arman, the artist who recently died and had maintained an outdoor studio on an irregular, triangular-shaped lot at the address.

    The site is at the edge of the historic shoreline within a high hazard flood plane and on the former site of a gas station.

    The developer originally sought a floor-to-area-ratio of about 7.98 for the site, which was subsequently lowered to about 7.6.

    The board, however, only approved a 6.5 F.A.R., which, according to Deirdre Carson of Greenberg Traurig, required a reduction in the height of the building and in the number of units. Ms. Carson said that the building will still be 11-stories tall, but will contain only 8 condominium apartments.

    Thomas McKay and Garrett Gourlay are the architects for the project that will employ a synthetic light-colored and highly textured material for three piers, only one of which extends to the ground floor, on Canal Street, where its height will match that of an adjoining red-brick building to the west, and a glass façade with inset balconies on the east façade on Greenwich Street where the building only rises 7 stories.

    At a recent hearing before the board, the discussion centered mostly on “hardship” issues and Bill McCorkin, a cost consultant, told the board that mandated acoustic insulation requires that the project’s triple-glazed windows have more space between the glass. Mr. Gourlay told the board that the building will only have glazing on 40 percent of its facades. He also said that proximity to the Holland Tunnel and soil conditions will require expensive caissons and that its irregularly shaped lot also presented economic hardships to the developer. He said that the project has a “75 percent efficient floor plate” while larger sites can attain 85 percent efficiency.

    Some residents of nearby buildings testified that the area “is a great market for residential projects,” noting that this project has 100 feet of river views and faces a small park.

    Mr. Mckay has indicated that the project would have a large-scale work by Arman, the only one in the city. It will be four-stories tall.

    Arman was born as Armand Fernandez in 1928 in Nice, France. In 1947, he met Yves Klein with whom he hitchhiked in Europe. In 1951, he taught at the Bushido Kai Judo School and then served as a medical orderly in the Indo-Chinese War. Influenced by a Kurt Schwitters exhibition in 1954. he began working with stamp ink-pads, in part to critic Abstract Expressionism and in a few years was throwing ink objects at canvases. In 1958 he dropped the "d" in his name, inspired by a printer's error. He proceeded to explore the use of many different materials in her art and assemblages, including rubbish and burnt objects and sliced and smashed objects and organic garbage. In 1964 he had his first museum retrospectives at the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, and at the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam.

  13. #13
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Very good news ^^^

  14. #14

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    Can't wait to see what that little strip of canal looks like in 2 years....however these developments come out they will be a big improvement over what is there now

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    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    And good riddance to POS like this along that stretch ...


    This billboard went up on Canal Street ...

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