View Poll Results: Taller Twintowers vs. Freedom Tower

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  • Taller Twins!

    36 83.72%
  • The Freedom Tower

    7 16.28%
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Thread: Taller Twintowers vs. Freedom Tower

  1. #1

    Default Taller Twintowers vs. Freedom Tower

    hey all,
    i'm back from www.skyscrapercity.com and there is the same poll, but here are more new-yorkers. now is my question for the new-yorkers on this site;

    what is better?

    Taller Twins: (with floors to around 1776' FT, that's are +-150 floors)


    Freedom Tower:
    you all does know how it looks...

  2. #2

    Default

    I don't mind if they are taller or a little bit shorter - the Twin Towers design is simple but brilliant. It has been one of the symbols of NYC for many years so I think it should stay that way.
    The Freedom Tower looks nice but not more than that.

  3. #3

    Default

    I agree the Twin Towers design was brilliant. Cold, steely, noble and sophisticated ... but also very comforting to see.

    And look how they work (style wise at least) with Cesar Pelli´s additions and with the formality of Battery Park City.

    Those overwrought twisting-turning, slant-roofed propsals all look forced and "2005 designer-trendy" compared to the old WTC.

  4. #4

  5. #5

    Default

    Get a life.

  6. #6
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    Default

    The original WTC was horrible urban planning. The view of the skyline from Staten Island is one thing, but the streetlife-killing superblock is really not something to pine for. Did anyone ever spend any time down there? Really unpleasant - not at all city, and definitely an example of what to avoid in large-scale urban developments... rehash Rockefeller center (again) if you must look to the past, but not WTC.

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fabrizio
    And look how they work (style wise at least) with Cesar Pelli´s additions and with the formality of Battery Park City.
    Yes - I agree with that. This was the most beautiful view in Manhattan. It still looks nice but without the WTC towers something's missing.

  8. #8

    Default

    Ryan : Yes, it was a grid busting, street-life killing superblock ....as much as Lincoln Center is. But it was tucked away downtown on blocks that the average New Yorker or out-of-towner never set foot on pre-WTC. I can´t talk for people who actually lived down there or worked at the WTC, but I always found the plaza to be awe-inspiring (although awfully windy at times). Even the Seagrams building ( regarded as one of the world´s masterpieces of architecture ) has a plaza that stands rather aloof. If the WTC were to be duplicated today, I would hope that the complex would be a more pedestrian friendly.... but a big, open, spare plaza lined with cafes and resturaunts, as seen in so many European cities, would be a nice asset to the city.

  9. #9
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    Default Neither

    Both of the designs are a mess. Time to start over and let a real visionary who as an eye for design, and experience (Foster?) take over.

  10. #10
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    Default

    Have you guys forgotten about the difficulty of getting tenants to occupy those towers if they were to be rebuilt again?

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ryan
    The original WTC was horrible urban planning. The view of the skyline from Staten Island is one thing, but the streetlife-killing superblock is really not something to pine for. Did anyone ever spend any time down there? Really unpleasant - not at all city, and definitely an example of what to avoid in large-scale urban developments... rehash Rockefeller center (again) if you must look to the past, but not WTC.
    Absolutely correct.

    Many of the comments and inaccurate observations about the streetscape I am reading here are what I'll call postcard views. Yes, there is something missing in the skyline, but how it looks from Brooklyn or Jersey City is not the only criteria for evaluating a building complex.

    I began working in Lower Manhattan when the WTC was built, and know firsthand what it did to the neighborhood.

    But it was tucked away downtown on blocks that the average New Yorker or out-of-towner never set foot on pre-WTC.
    Incorrect.

  12. #12
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    Angry

    I would have very mixed feelings about this. Happy for the victorious fact that they are there again, my old friends who I miss so much. And taller- that would be great. I loved them before they were gone, so how could I not be happy to see them again. They looked great. But also I would feel a remorse, that a second chance to do them should involve more creativity. Keeping the same duality, same symbolism.

    Basically, I am saying rebuild the twins but taller, better, and with an improved design. This is not an improvement because I saw another rendering of this proposal in daylight that shows the windows as boxy- HORRIBLE idea. One of my favorite things about the Towers was the use of shiny metal bands that branched up into the heavens, and gave them an incredible glow in the different light conditions. Those new horizontal things suck.

    By the way, my last memory of the plaza everyone loves to hate-
    It was a gorgeous sunny afternoon in August 2001, one of those New York days when the sky is a solid arc of brilliant blue that the buildings seem to bounce off of.
    A Salsa performer, la India, was singing from the stage that had been set up between the Towers. People were dancing everywhere, those that came specifically for the concert, like myself, and those that stumbled into it. And all I can say, is that for my friend Claudia and I ,it was not a dead plaza but
    one filled with joy and music, happiness to be in NEW YORK and dancing in the midst of those giants. Summer ended, and on September 11 so did they.

  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ZippyTheChimp
    Absolutely correct.

    Many of the comments and inaccurate observations about the streetscape I am reading here are what I'll call postcard views. Yes, there is something missing in the skyline, but how it looks from Brooklyn or Jersey City is not the only criteria for evaluating a building complex.

    I began working in Lower Manhattan when the WTC was built, and know firsthand what it did to the neighborhood.


    Incorrect.
    I agree with Zippy. I would love to see the old towers back, but realistically it's not going to happen. While I agree that the old plaza should not be replicated, breaking up the superblock itself is not necesarily a good thing. Rockefeller Center and South St. Seaport are superblocks, but unlike the old WTC and Lincoln Center, they weren't sterile, and have been sucessful with facilitating street life for pedestrians. Keeping the superblock with pedestrian/bike/light-rail streets instead of vehicular traffic would be a good option (if we do light rail then it should be expanded by the rest of Fulton and Liberty).

  14. #14

    Default

    The Twin Towers were ugly boxy designs that cut off city life in Lower Manhattan. Thank God they're gone. They were a crime against architecture and made New York look cold, stiff, and arrogant. You guys must be crazy to go for 150+ floors. Only those with super size egos would want to build something even taller than the twin towers.

    Good design and beauty matters more than height. 150+ floors is impractical for today's business world. What if all those floors remain unoccupied? It's a waste of space, no one would want to work in the very upper floors high up in the sky, and even if people did want to work up there, it would be a logistical nightmare to evacuate everyone in all the floors to ground level.

    105 floors is acceptable, but 150? I've heard crazy people with megalomaniac delusions going for 200+.

    The Twin Towers, along with the MetLife building ranks up there as the worst architecture in the history of New York.

    The Empire State, the Chrysler, the Flatiron, the Woolworth, the Seagram, Grand Central, the Metropolitan Life Insurance Tower, Rockefeller Center, and the future New York Times Tower are what New York architecture should be about.

  15. #15
    Forum Veteran MidtownGuy's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Coleridge
    The Twin Towers were ugly boxy designs that cut off city life in Lower Manhattan. Thank God they're gone. They were a crime against architecture and made New York look cold, stiff, and arrogant.
    whatevah

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