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Thread: Union Square Park

  1. #31

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    Was I at the wrong end of the park if I wanted to see this:


    Is ^ that ^ opposite the Whole Foods near Union Square Park?

  2. #32

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    The Pavilion is on the north side of Union Square. Whole Foods is at the southern end, 14th St.


    North Plaza Renovation


  3. #33

  4. #34

  5. #35

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    Where is a photo like this taken from? Second floor of the Whole Foods on 14th St.? Or farther west?

  6. #36
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Not farther west ... WF most likely.

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Benniest View Post
    Where is a photo like this taken from? Second floor of the Whole Foods on 14th St.? Or farther west?
    Taken from the 4th floor of Filene's Basement.

  8. #38

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    http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/20...uare-building/

    January 27, 2009, 12:39 pm
    In Union Square, Copper Leaves the Building

    By C. J. Hughes
    Zen PalateAshley Gilbertson For The New York Times


    The site of a former Zen Palate restaurant, with copper panels missing and plywood exposed, on Union Square East and 16th Street on Jan. 19.


    Archaeologists of the future might be able to learn something about present-day humans by studying the facade of 34 Union Square East.

    They could conclude that today’s Homo sapiens considered copper somewhat precious. By looking at the building, they might also be able to guess a typical person’s height.

    Since a restaurant there closed in October 2007, half a dozen large copper panels have been stripped from the building from the ground up. Assuming that no stepladders or milk crates were used, a person about six feet tall, with arms outstretched and a forceful tug and perhaps a bit of tiptoe, too, was most likely the culprit, or one of them.

    Sheets of stained plywood are now exposed up to about 10 feet high. Above that level, the panels are intact.

    The stripping began in September, according to Bonnie Gold, a partner in RAB Realty, the building’s owner. And there have been thefts at the building since then. Mounted lanterns have disappeared from the exterior. In addition, someone broke in and looted copper pipes from the building’s three kitchens, said Ms. Gold, who has since reported the crimes.

    “Whatever they can take, they are taking,” she said. “It’s terrible. I mean, really.”
    And the criminals were brazen, she added. She said that a few months ago her daughter saw men removing copper panels in daylight, while she was walking home from school.

    “But she thought they were workmen and didn’t think anything of it,” Ms. Gold said.

    One attempt to steal paneling might have been interrupted. A greenish panel was hanging partly peeled back, like the flap of an opened envelope, until Ms. Gold had it cut off on Monday so no one would get hurt.

    Unknown is what the last tenant, the Zen Palate chain of vegetarian restaurants, may think of the damage to its former home. Its inventive combinations of metal, stucco and glass block was praised as a “rich but understated medley” in the most recent version of the A.I.A. Guide to New York City,” published in 2000.

    Attempts by telephone to obtain comment from the HOV Group, the parent of Zen Palate, which is still in operation in the financial district and Hell’s Kitchen, were not successful. (But if the company’s mission statement is to be believed, about how “from the restaurant to the corporate levels” it’s motivated by “humility, empathy, providence passion and integrity,” perhaps the defacers may be forgiven.)

    For those who have lived and worked by Union Square Park for years, the theft is a troubling reminder of the 1980s, when crime was prevalent, says Gloria Chan, who manages Disc-o-Rama, a nearby music store.

    “It’s sad because it destroys the image of the neighborhood,” said Ms. Chan, who has worked at the store since 1980. “It’s supposed to be getting better and not worse.”

    But the theft of copper and other metals — plumbing from construction sites, plaques from public parks and even manholes from streets — became a nationwide epidemic when the value of metals shot up. Though scrap dealers now pay about $1.20 a pound for copper, the nonferrous metal commanded $3 a pound a year ago, said a worker at one dealer, the Timpson Trading Corporation who would not give his name.

    To deter theft, the company, which is based in Hunts Point in the Bronx, refuses to buy Con Edison wires or city property, because items from those entities are more likely to have been stolen, the worker said. It also demands to see driver’s licenses and takes down license plate numbers when sellers come in.

    “But there’s no real way of knowing where anything else comes from,” the employee admitted.

    Though commodities prices may have dipped, some Union Square workers are not sighing with relief just yet.

    In the early hours of New Year’s Day, thieves broke into a newsstand belonging to Mohammed Khokan and took an A.T.M. containing $5,000, Mr. Khokan said. And, he added, it is quite conceivable that a future target may be his stand’s green-metal walls.

    “There are a lot of crazies in this area, my friend,” Mr. Khokan said. “I don’t always believe that when I leave for the night my store will be here the next day.”

  9. #39

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    Most of the plaza is complete. simple, not fussy.

    Trees define the perimeter. I think the green boxes are unfinished utility connections for the greenmarket.




    New playground, pavilion restoration, restrooms.

  10. #40
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Check out this great old beauty that used to stand at the SE corner of E 14th & Fourth Avenue where the Walgreens now sits (it's mis-labeled -- it states the view is looking to the NW, when it's actually looking at the intersection from the NW to the SE):

    Image ID: 1507795
    14th Street (East) c. 1917

  11. #41

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    Beautiful.

  12. #42
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    More about it (The German Savings Bank, 1870-72; Arch.: Henry Fernbach & Edward Kendall) HERE and HERE:

    Q. Accounts of the career of Augustus Saint-Gaudens refer to his first studio in the “German Savings Bank building.” The date would have been in the 1870s. Would you know the address? ... Samuel G. White, Manhattan

    A. The old bank, built in 1872, had a heavy, classic white marble facade with a mansard roof and a picturesque corner cupola — an artist’s studio, perhaps? It stood at the angled southeast corner of 14th Street and Fourth Avenue and was designed by Henry Fernbach with Edward Kendall.

    It was at the bank that Saint-Gaudens met Stanford White in the 1870s. In 1913, The New York Times related an account of the meeting from Saint-Gaudens's memoir. White was climbing the bank stairs on other business when he heard the sculptor “bawl the Andante of Beethoven’s Seventh Symphony.” White decided to drop in to meet the singer. Within a year or two, they had designed the statue of Admiral Farragut in Madison Square Park. They remained close friends and collaborators for the rest of their lives.

    The German Savings Bank, renamed in 1918 the Central Savings Bank, was demolished in 1962 for the apartment house now on the site.

  13. #43
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    And lucky us, look at what we have instead.

  14. #44
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    Horrible. This is progress?

  15. #45

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    Following the history of NYC architecture over the last 65 years, any notions of a natural trajectory of human civilization and progress begin to dissolve. Obviously, we have climate-controlling elements, building materials and engineering capabilities we never could've dreamed about then. But I guess it shows the Romans always have to be on the lookout for barbarians, so to speak (and in the case of NYC architecture, the barbarians began looting the city after WWII...).

    Enough digressing. Anyone know what was previously on the site of the Zeckendorf Towers? I've wondered about that for years.

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