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Thread: The Link - 310 West 52nd Street - Condo - by Costas Kondylis

  1. #256
    Senior Swanky Peteynyc1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amigo88 View Post
    Will the proposed changes to the tax abatement program affect the Link obtaining a 421a exemption?
    I would like to know that as well. I think the proposed changes are still a ways off and this building should be OK. I also thought i remember hearing that the proposal to change the 421a policy fell apart at their forum. Have you talked to the sales office at all about this? It would be good to make sure Elad is on top of the application as well so the same situation that happened at the Orion doesnt happen here.

    Has anyone heard any updates on when the building is truly going to be completed?

  2. #257

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    11/20.. nice but not much more than that


  3. #258
    Forum Veteran TREPYE's Avatar
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    ^ As bland as a warm glass of water.

  4. #259

    Default building opening

    The sales office is moving into the building the first week in December. The model apartment will be opening then as well.
    Opinions may change at that point.
    PM

  5. #260

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    treype: then here's a toast with that warm glass of water.

    Compare this to most of those other "luxury" condos in the area. Look at the brick condo in the corner of that photo.... floor plates...exposed airconditioners... junky. At least the Link humbly fades into the background...its slick and seamless... goes with everything. Less reflective would be nice, but still, as shown in that photo, it's very dignified.

  6. #261

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fabrizio View Post
    then here's a toast with that warm glass of water.

    ...At least the Link humbly fades into the background...its slick and seamless... goes with everything. Less reflective would be nice, but still, as shown in that photo, it's very dignified.
    Agreed, and look at what the reflections do in those inside corners. Not so boring.

    Massing generates some interest without being overwrought, proportions are nice and slender.

    If this were New York's average architecture, we'd have an even more beautiful city than we already have. In its aesthetic stance, this building occupies the glass version of a niche not far from the one that 15 CPW is in.

  7. #262
    Senior Swanky Peteynyc1's Avatar
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    Fabrizio and Ablarc...finally some well thought comments on this building which was nice to see. I think the blueish glass and silver trimmings look great. Things I really like:
    1) central air with no exposed air conditioners (or obstructed views from inside).
    2) mechanical components well hidden up top behind a glass shield so no vents down below near the base at all.
    3) a cleaver use of a platform to create outdoor space without reducing parking for the area.
    4) air rights transferred and protected all the way around so no rediculous ugly blank cement walls like we are getting so used to seeing today (325 5th, etc).
    In my opinion, these points show that the developer did not take the cheap route that so many others do today. Would they still sell the units without the platform they paid substantially for? Definitely. Did they have to hide the water and mechanical the way they did? Probably not.

  8. #263

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peteynyc1 View Post
    Would they still sell the units without the platform they paid substantially for? Definitely. Did they have to hide the water and mechanical the way they did? Probably not.
    Even those last two items were probably worth a few bucks per square foot in revenue. Psychological perception and involuntary response to genuine elegance, you know. (Folks aren't really as dumb as we make them out.)

  9. #264

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    Now look at the "47 E 34th Street" thread. Imagine if something like the Link's tower were in its place.

    I DONT believe 47 E34th is ugly because of developers hardship, because its sooooo expensive to do something better. Hogwash.

    Good points about the above tower by PeteNYC:

    1) central air with no exposed air conditioners (or obstructed views from inside).
    2) mechanical components well hidden up top behind a glass shield so no vents down below near the base at all.
    3) a cleaver use of a platform to create outdoor space without reducing parking for the area.
    4) air rights transferred and protected all the way around so no rediculous ugly blank cement walls like we are getting so used to seeing today (325 5th, etc).

    5) add Ablarcs observation about how the reflective glass is an asset here.

    Also note the nice verticale proportions of the windows. Keeps it in harmony with its older neighbors.

    -----------
    Last edited by Fabrizio; November 22nd, 2006 at 11:22 AM.

  10. #265

  11. #266
    Moderator NYatKNIGHT's Avatar
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    Nice shot, kznyc2k, you found a nice viewing slot for this one, and a very thorough construction update all around. I'm in agreement with the general consensus here - this new building is one of the good ones.

  12. #267

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    Thank you. I don't get into the city that much any more, so when I do get the chance I go all out.

  13. #268
    Forum Veteran TREPYE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fabrizio View Post
    treype: then here's a toast with that warm glass of water.

    Compare this to most of those other "luxury" condos in the area. Look at the brick condo in the corner of that photo.... floor plates...exposed airconditioners... junky. At least the Link humbly fades into the background...its slick and seamless... goes with everything. Less reflective would be nice, but still, as shown in that photo, it's very dignified.
    Well of course relative to its neighbors it is better. This however does not mean that its not bland. The opposite thing happens with the Barclay tower. An ok tower, nothing to write home about, but what makes it truly horrendous is the fact that it is standing next to the high bar of architectural standards. Its still not terrible on its own; in other words, there is a lot worse Kaufman-like stuff around. The link may be improved upon by its mediocre surroundings but it is still bland.

    I guess I would rather have that glass of warm water instead of some of the cough syrup that surrounds it. But it doesnt mean that I can't still prefer and expect good merlot.
    Last edited by TREPYE; November 22nd, 2006 at 09:15 PM.

  14. #269

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    Talkin to me? You want a Sangiovese.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sangiovese

  15. #270
    Senior Swanky Peteynyc1's Avatar
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    Default an older article but one i dont think was posted...

    Business & Labor
    Luxury on the Rise in Hell's Kitchen

    (newyork.construction.com, August 2006 issue)

    By Diane Greer

    A new 42-story condominium building will hang over its neighbors on columns and cantilevers while accenting its up-and-coming Manhattan neighborhood's historically gruff style.

    Hell's Kitchen, still one of Manhattan's fringe neighborhoods, is getting a slicker feel with a wave of new high-end condominium developments.
    The historically gritty neighborhood at times gets obscured when real estate agents or developers stretch the definition of Midtown West or call the area by its formal name, Clinton, to attract buyers and renters to the area west of Times Square and Columbus Circle. The roster of new condominium developments in that vein includes properties such as the $74 million Clinton West on 47th Street between 10th and 11th avenues, which opened last year, and the $170 million Mosaic on 10th Avenue between 51st and 53rd streets, which broke ground in spring 2005 under its original name of Clinton Green.
    But New York-based Elad Properties is playing off of the neighborhood's edgy image to market the Link, a sleek new 42-story condominium rising on West 52nd Street between Eighth and Ninth avenues.
    "We like the juxtaposition of a high-end glass tower with a cutting-edge design in a neighborhood not known for being high tech and cutting edge," said Tom Elliott, vice president of market and design for Elad Properties.
    The $80 million, 265,000-sq.-ft. project designed by New York-based Costas Kondylis and Partners will also have two six-story town houses sited on the half of the 100- by 100-ft. property that is located in the Clinton Preservation District, which limits building heights to six stories.
    Construction of the cast-in-place concrete building started in April 2005 after crews demolished the Studio Instrument Rental Building to make way for the new structure. Topping out ceremonies took place at the end of May, and the building is slated to open in May next year.

    Elad bought the property on Eighth Avenue - along with air rights for an adjacent Howard Johnson Hotel - from Hampshire Hotel Group in 2004. The air rights enabled construction of the tall tower and the extension of the building's floor plate over a portion of the hotel and an adjoining parking garage, said Yoel Shargain, senior vice president at Elad.
    Hampshire has since sold the hotel property to Hampton Inn.
    On the east side of the building, starting at the fourth floor, the floor plate extends 22 ft. over the Hampton Inn. The initial designs would have supported the extension with two columns threaded through the back of the hotel, said Martin Loy, project manager for Tishman Construction, the construction manager on the project.
    But the plan changed. Now, shear walls going up to the eighth floor and additional concrete support the cantilever, Loy said.
    "It slowed down work on the superstructure on the lower floors but helped in the long run because we didn't have to drop columns through switchgear rooms in the hotel," he added. "We ended up going with a true cantilever to save on that work."
    To the south, the floor plate also extends by 22 ft., in this case over the garage, starting at the third floor. A deck for a third-floor roof garden extends over the remainder of the garage to 51st Street.
    To support those structures, the project team stuck to the original plan to use columns on footings, threading four large steel beams through four floors of the garage. Crews had to relocate existing M-E-P equipment in the garage and avoid walls, oil tanks, and other obstructions in order to install the columns.
    Another complication in construction of the footings was access to the garage, which is operated by HJ Parking and leased from the hotel. The only way in to the two cellar floors is via a lift that the garage needs to move cars, requiring the project team to seek another entry point.
    "We ended up saw-cutting a hole in their second cellar wall and then left a hole in our foundation wall so we had access to the cellar," Loy said. "Once I was able to get those four columns dropped in, the hard part was over."
    The team used pulley and conveyor systems to remove excavation debris from the footing dig.
    Constructing the tower on a tight lot along a busy street, across from a school, meant dealing with a lot of traffic, Loy added. In order to keep deliveries off the street, the team left out the second-story floor slab in the town houses, and now uses a hoist in the courtyard to bring materials into the back of the structure.
    The tower façade features a window wall panel system made of aluminum and glass that extends from slab to slab without using knee walls, while still fully covering the columns and slabs. The town house façades are of charcoal-glazed brick.
    The panels aim to evoke an "edgy building," said Costas Kondylis, principal of his namesake firm.
    "We wanted to have a very glassy building to maximize the views and the light inside the apartments," he added. "You have to make sure you create a design that has value. We wanted it to look great 10 to 20 years from now."
    Tenants will enter the building through a glass cube placed in a landscaped plaza.
    "We took the vestibule out of the lobby," Kondylis said. "This gives us some identity at street level."
    The interiors of the 215 apartments, designed by Gal Nauer, feature low-profile cabinetry, glass tiles, hardwood floors, and high-end appliances. The condominiums are on the market on a range from $640,000 to $4 million, with the town houses selling for $3.2 million and the penthouses for $3.5 million to $4 million. More than half of the units have sold.
    The building is designed with sections that jut out of the main footprint to create six corners. The layouts combine the living room, dining room, and kitchen into one large room placed at the corners, which provide wraparound, two-directional views through floor-to-ceiling windows.
    Amenities include a fitness club, lobby garden, and 2,500-sq.-ft. meditation garden on the outdoor deck.
    "For Hell's Kitchen, we have a lot of outdoor space," Elliott said.

    Key Players

    Owner: Elad Properties, New York

    Construction Manager: Tishman Construction, New York

    Architect: Costas Kondylis and Partners, New York; Gal Nauer Architects, New York

    Structural Engineer: WSP Cantor Seinuk, New York

    M-E-P Engineer: Cosentini Associates, New York

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