Page 89 of 141 FirstFirst ... 397985868788899091929399139 ... LastLast
Results 1,321 to 1,335 of 2110

Thread: Manhattan Residential Development

  1. #1321
    http://tinyurl.com/2ag28z Front_Porch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Manhattan 90210
    Posts
    1,413

    Default Absenteeism. . .

    our neighbors on either side are pied-a-terre owners, and the building has far less of a community feel than the co-ops and rentals I've lived in . . . it's the primary reason I don't like living in a condo, though it is a good point that the amenities are underused . . . I can generally enjoy the sun deck and the piano when I want them.

    ali r.
    {downtown broker}

  2. #1322
    http://tinyurl.com/2ag28z Front_Porch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Manhattan 90210
    Posts
    1,413

    Default NYT article on floor plans. . .

    Fine NY Times article on floor plans today, with excellent use of Front_Porch in the sidebar. As I understand it, this ran in the national edition only, not the local.

    ali r.
    {downtown broker}

    Where Floor Plans Are Sought After, and Why

    By JOYCE COHEN
    Published: February 11, 2007



    THERE are things New York apartments typically lack — a yard, a parking place, a washer-dryer. But there is one thing they do possess: floor plans, most often derived from buildings’ original marketing materials.

    Floor plans are important when an apartment goes on the market and a listing goes on the Web, real estate agents say, because buyers in New York depend so heavily on them.


    “If I don’t have it on the Internet right away, people want me to fax over a floor plan,” said Lauren Cangiano, an agent at Halstead Property Company in Manhattan. She added that “there are things that will make you not visit an apartment if it doesn’t show on the floor plan.”


    “People want split bedrooms; they don’t want bedrooms next to each other,” Ms. Cangiano said. “Or they want a kitchen with a window so they can sneak a cigarette.”


    A floor plan shows the entire unit, not just part of it. In other words, floor plans reveal what photographs often do not: the proportions of rooms, the number of rooms and the traffic flows among them. A buyer can instantly see, for instance, if the kitchen is conveniently situated near the dining room, whether bedrooms open directly onto the living room or whether a trip to the bathroom will involve a walk through a bedroom.


    “When you look at a floor plan, it is the apartment standing there naked,” said Gerald Makowski, director of marketing at Halstead Property.


    Floor plans are starting to move into three dimensions, a real help for those who have trouble visualizing physical space. Some developers show elevation plans, where you can pick a floor from the side view of a building and then highlight a particular unit. More customization is likely as technology improves.


    Outside New York, however, floor plans are rarely used as marketing tools by brokers who are reselling houses, although they are more likely to be used by builders of housing developments, who include floor plans as one of the many tools on their Web sites.


    The Toll Brothers Web site, for example, includes an elaborate “design your own home” feature allowing people, within limits, to experiment with the floor plan. “They get to design something with the builder and make it their own, and not settle for a resale situation where someone else has made those decisions,” said Kira McCarron, chief marketing officer at Toll Brothers.


    Those who are downsizing scrutinize the floor plan most thoroughly, said Kara Opanowicz, a vice president of architecture for K. Hovnanian Homes. “We have a lot of move-down buyers — empty-nesters taking their furniture with them,” who want to be sure everything will fit, she said. “They are concerned with the exactness of what they are getting.”


    Brent Gleeson, the president of NewCondosOnline.com, which markets new condominiums worldwide, estimated that 90 percent of the properties that he was selling featured a floor plan online. In fact, the most requested items from prospective buyers using the site are prices and floor plans.


    These plans help buyers determine “how much space they want and need,” Mr. Gleeson said — something they are not able to do with an on-site visit. “Builders do preconstruction and presale advertising, so they are marketing properties that have not yet been built.”


    Some individual agents are beginning to create floor plans to distinguish themselves from the competition. Christine Pardo, an agent at Kroll Realty in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., often creates her own floor plans for clients, similar to those she created when she was a kitchen designer. It is time-consuming: She spends an hour measuring and another hour working with a computer program.


    People are always impressed by the result, she said. Currently, with so much inventory in Florida, “it would be easy to show a buyer between 6 and 25 homes a weekend,” she said. “After 25 homes, which are you going to remember? The ones you are holding paperwork on.”


    Sellers who want to create their own floor plans or experiment with designs can try user-friendly programs like those from smartdraw.com and plan3d.com.


    There are endless debates about what floor plans should feature, and there is no standardization, so users should be aware of what the plans show and what they do not.


    Many include a key plan, showing the unit’s location on the floor of a building. But what about the swing of the doors? A thick line to indicate a load-bearing wall? The depth of a fireplace mantel? Some include interesting extras, like a label for a skylight.



    But plenty of basic structural information can be missing: the height of the windows, the width of hallways, the placement of electrical outlets, the apartment’s overall condition. Some lack an arrow pointing north.



    Older plans usually show crosshatching in kitchen and bathrooms, to distinguish wet and dry areas. Now, the convention is to use crosshatching only in bathrooms, said Doug Barton, who creates floor plans for several New York real estate brokerage firms.


    “I don’t do it in kitchens,” he said, “because you have other things going on there. People want to know how many bathrooms there are, but usually there is one kitchen.”


    In addition, dimensions are often printed on floor plans, but there is no guarantee that they are accurate. “You must always challenge the dimensions,” Mr. Barton said. “I have seen two particular situations that were wrong. There was a squarish bedroom labeled 10 feet by 15 feet and a rectangular bedroom labeled 14 feet by 14 feet. So use your brain.”


    Stephen Joseph, vice president for store design of Bergdorf Goodman, loved the floor plan of a West End Avenue one-bedroom co-op, but was ambivalent when he finally saw the apartment. Almost every window faced a brick wall — a deal breaker that hadn’t appeared on the floor plan. Only the living room had a view of the street, and not a nice one.


    “I went back time after time,” he said. “I tortured myself.”


    Mr. Joseph ended up withdrawing his offer and buying a duplex with a floor plan that revealed lots of open space. This one had a lovely view of Broadway. What counts for him, Mr. Joseph said, are the three L’s: layout, light and location.


    “I have seen so many apartments that didn’t have any views, that were all interior,” he said. Had this information been on the floor plan, “I never would have gone to see them.”


    To help people read floor plans, Brooklyn Bridge Realty in Cobble Hill, Brooklyn, has started using three-dimensional ones prepared by the Gotham Photo Company. Clients love it, and “it is so much easier to read than a bare floor plan,” especially when it comes to staircases, said Jean Austin, the owner.


    That third dimension is likely to be increasingly important. “Real estate lends itself really well to 3-D,” said Vince Collura, director of business development for Gotham Photo.


    He predicts that people will be able to zoom into the floor plan, so that “instead of a bird’s-eye view, you’re at a standing level,” he said, and to customize the plan by changing the color of the walls and floors.


    Technology has made people increasingly design-conscious, helping them realize that layout may be as important as size, said Leonard Steinberg, a vice president at Prudential Douglas Elliman in New York.


    “The big shift happened when people realized how much space a regular TV used rather than a plasma TV,” he said. “The clunky old TV took up four square feet. Hello! That is $4,000 in New York!”



    Which Way Is Up? Here’s Some Help

    By JOYCE COHEN
    Published: February 11, 2007
    IF you have trouble understanding or making use of floor plans, here are some suggestions:


    Compare a room with one that is familiar. “My old bedroom was 12 by 18,” said Alison Rogers, an agent at DG Neary Realty. “I can’t tell how big a room is, but I can tell if it is bigger or smaller than my bedroom.”


    Play designer: Enlarge the floor plan and make cutouts of your furniture to scale, so you can rearrange them on the plan and see how everything fits.

    Carry a tape measure and verify measurements. “Sometimes those measurements are really wrong,” said Leonard Steinberg of Prudential Douglas Elliman.


    Look up. If you are distracted by the furniture and cannot see the edges of a room, looking at the ceiling will give you the footprint, with some exceptions, like a kitchen island or peninsula, said Bradford Trebach of Trebach Realty in the Bronx.

  3. #1323
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    From Ablarc:

    One of the ugliest places in New York.

    An ancient little building’s party wall brutally mutilated (with – could it be? -- vinyl siding?).

    Stupid beyond comprehension or belief.



    English Brutalist “townscape.”


    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post

    I believe that row house in Tribeca is sporting wooden clapboards ...
    Quote Originally Posted by infoshare View Post

    They were - at one point - real wooden clapboards: but the paint was continually peeling.

    Presumably the solution was to cover them with aluminum siding.

    Anyone with the facts on this little mystery - please chime in.
    I did the "knuckle test" on this building yesterday ...

    No vinyl -- or aluminum -- siding here.

    Solid wooden clapboards / fences / trim all around (not sure about the windows, though):




  4. #1324
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    The City's Vast Condominium Potential



    By MICHAEL STOLER
    February 8, 2007

    To all those Wall Street executives who reaped enormous bonuses in 2006: Perhaps you are ready for a career change. You have been successful in the world of finance; now, should you transfer your entrepreneurial skills real estate investment?

    For the would-be developer, it is not too late to dive into the shark pit and try your luck with building residential condominiums in New York City.

    A managing partner at Massey Knakal Realty, Shimon Shkury, says his firm is listing 38 development sites in the five boroughs. Thirteen sites are available in Manhattan, 12 in Brooklyn, seven in Queens, three in the Bronx, and three on Staten Island. Prices range from as low as $48 a buildable foot, on Marcy Avenue and Stockton Street in Brooklyn, to $360 a buildable foot, in Manhattan.

    In the Bronx, an investment banker is marketing for sale one of the largest development sites in the city, Fordham Landing, which is available for immediate residential, dormitory, medical, or other community facility development. The 3.7-acre site, located on the Harlem River across from Manhattan in the University Heights section of the Bronx, permits more than 550,000 square feet of development for residential use, without the need for approvals or variances.

    "There aren't any real ‘killer' sites being offered at the moment," the president of SJP Residential, Allen Goldman, said. "In fact, the offerings of large sites suitable for residential development are few in number. I suspect that great sites, which have location, height, and views, would still be asking north of $400 a square foot. ‘B sites' are showing signs of lower numbers with more urgency to sell, some being offered in the range of $200 a buildable square foot."

    CHELSEA HIGH LINE DISTRICT


    The West Chelsea High Line district is one of the
    hottest neighborhoods in Manhattan for condominium
    development, writes Michael Stoler.


    One of the most sought out new areas of development is in the West Chelsea High Line district, considered by many as one of the hottest residential and commercial neighborhoods in Manhattan. On Valentine's Day, prior to taking your wife or sweetheart to dinner, you can submit your allcash offer by 3 p.m. to the professionals at Eastern Consolidated Properties. They are offering for sale a site at 537–545 W. 27th St., a block-through development site where you could develop more than 123,000 square feet of commercial or residential space or a community facility building without zoning changes or variances. A developer could increase the size of the building by purchasing air rights and using an inclusionary housing bonus, which would increase the size of the development to more than 185,000 square feet. Real estate experts expect the site to trade for more than $300 a buildable foot.

    Another site is a block-through commercial development site at 511–517 W. 21st St. with frontage on both 21st and 22nd streets. A developer can build a 100,000-square-feet building for use as a gallery or a hotel, and industry sources expect the site to sell for more than $500 a buildable foot.


    UPPER EAST SIDE, SUTTON PLACE, & TURTLE BAY

    A development site ready for immediate construction is at 305 E. 85th St., with frontage on Second Avenue. Yesterday at 3 p.m., allcash bids for this L-shaped parcel were due to be submitted to the senior director at Eastern Consolidated, Alan Miller. The winning bidder has an opportunity to construct a 21-story, 117,663-squarefoot tower with 4,125 square feet of retail. "The property will probably fetch north of $400 per buildable square foot, partly due to the fact that the project will be breaking ground in the spring, and design and development drawings are 100% complete," Mr. Miller said.

    Later this month, a 60,000-square-foot development site at 1480 Second Ave. on the northeast corner of East 77th Street will be sold to a developer who plans to construct another condominium. The site is expected to trade for about $375 a buildable foot.


    UPPER WEST SIDE

    The Young Israel West Side Synagogue has retained an investment banker to expedite the sale of a prime development site. A developer can build a 110,682-squarefoot residential condominium on floors five to 22 that will house 45 residential condominiums at the site of the synagogue, at 210 W. 91st St. between Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue. The synagogue is seeking $16 million for the development site. The price includes completed architectural plans and legal and operating agreements.

    Industry leaders are cautiously optimistic about the future of condominium demand in the city.

    "We are seeing sites that were originally purchased for condominium development now getting developed as alternative uses such as office, hotel, rental, or some combination," the executive vice president of Bank of America, James Hedden, said. "Lenders have pulled back from condo lending with only prime locations and top-tier developers commanding the capital."

    SJP Residential's Mr. Goldman said he thinks "some of the outer borough development sites need a dose of reality when it comes to land prices. The Williamsburg and Long Island City buyers are not paying the prices for condos that would justify the land prices of a year ago. Sellers see it and are adjusting their prices downward faster than Manhattan sellers."

    Eastern Consolidated's Mr. Miller said proposed changes in 421-a legislation "will definitely affect land prices, as the condominium buyer will not have that tax savings passed through to them from the developer. In my opinion, land prices will drop by as much as $75 per buildable square foot as this valuable program appears to be coming to an end as we now know it."

    Despite signs that lenders are more cautious on financing condominium development than they were in recent years, dozens of projects are now in the pipeline.

    On the Upper East Side, a number of condominium developments are in various stages of planning and construction.

    Later this year, the Related Cos .will begin development of a new tower at 200 E. 86th St. on Third Avenue. The 20-story building will have 190 units and 14,000 square feet of retail space. One block north, Extell Development has already begun construction of its mixed-use residential condominium on the corner of Lexington Avenue and East 86th Street. Directly across the street is a branch of Emigrant Savings Bank, at 1270 Lexington Ave. The site is owned by Ramaz School, which is planning to select a developer to build a new school and a residential condominium tower on the upper floors.

    World Wide Holdings has begun construction at 1425 Second Ave., on the northwest corner of 74th Street. The 30-story tower will also have about 70 residential units and a 44,000-square-foot Equinox Fitness Center. World Wide has been active along Second Avenue. A few years ago, the company built the Milan Condominium on East 55th Street and Second Avenue, on the former site of the legendary El Morocco nightclub. As reported in The New York Sun last October, World Wide has made an agreement with the city for a 75-year lease of a 1.5-acre site on East 57th Street and Second Avenue, where it will raze the existing schools, P.S. 59 and the High School of Arts and Design, build two new schools, and develop a 59-story apartment tower and a fourstory band of retail stores.

    A great deal of new construction is in various stages on Second Avenue between 49th and 53rd streets. Late last year, Macklowe Properties completed ThreeTen Condo, at the corner of Second Avenue and 53rd Street. Directly across the street, at 250 E. 53rd St., is the Veneto, a development of the Related Cos. The 32-story tower will have 137 condominium units. Construction is scheduled to begin at a site at 303–307 E. 51st St., directly off the corner of 51st Street and Second Avenue, where Kennelly Development Co. plans to erect a 40-story residential condominium tower with 117 apartments.

    One block away, at 946–952 Second Ave. between 50th and 51st streets, another condominium tower is planned. Directly across the street, at 249–253 E. 50th St., where the restaurants Lutece, Leopard, and Kate Kearney's once stood, another residential building is rising. Demolition is under way at 49th Street and Second Avenue, where a developer has obtained financing from Lehman Brothers to build a residential condominium.

    On the West Side, a 20-story residential condominium is planned for 230 W. 78th St. between Amsterdam Avenue and Broadway. The building, a development of Urban Residential Properties, will have 34 apartments.
    Construction has begun on a 16-story residential condominium at 120 W. 72nd St. between Columbus Avenue and Broadway. The tower, a development of Anbau Enterprises, which recently completed the conversion of the Intercontinental Hotel at 110 Central Park South, will have 22 apartments.

    At the southwest corner of 72nd Street, at 2075 Broadway, a 19-story condominium is rising. The site, directly across the street from Broadway and the 72nd Street subway stop, will have a total of 49,478 square feet of retail on four levels.

    Other planned developments include a 600,000-square-foot site located on the north side of West 28th Street stretching the entire block front of Eleventh Avenue between 28th and 29th streets. A second site is a 250,000-square-foot block-through site that spans the entire block front of Eleventh Avenue between 26th and 27th streets.

    In conclusion, I have to concur with Mr. Goldman when he says lenders "are definitely more cautious, particularly with condo development. The new guy doesn't have a chance unless he has lots of equity." So, if you want to try your hand at residential development, I suggest that you evaluate all the risks and perhaps invest with a seasoned real estate professional who understands the risks of construction and development. One suggestion: Definitely don't give up your day job and risk your bonus.

    © 2007 The New York Sun, One SL, LLC.

  5. #1325
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    Goodnight, Moondance



    Residential condominiums will be built at the site of
    the Moondance Diner on Sixth Avenue.


    By GARY SHAPIRO
    Staff Reporter of the Sun
    February 13, 2007

    On the western frontier of SoHo, the Moondance Diner is dancing off into the sunset: Along with an adjacent two-story parking garage and a parking lot, it is going to be developed into luxury residential condominiums.

    The Moondance Diner's incandescent, crescent-shaped sign is a beacon for hungry visitors roaming north of Canal Street amid a Hopper-esque landscape not far from the mouth of the Holland Tunnel. The late-night watering hole has appeared in episodes of "Friends" and "Sex and the City," and it was where Peter Parker's girlfriend, Mary Jane, played by Kirsten Dunst, waited tables in the 2002 film "Spider-Man." In real life, playwright Jonathan Larson ("Rent") worked at the diner.

    The development is among several changes taking place in the neighborhood, which is characterized by low-slung buildings along Sixth Avenue that are attracting private investment. "SoHo'sdevelopment is moving westward," the director of the SoHo Alliance, a neighborhood organization, Sean Sweeney, said. The site of a former Mobil gas station farther north, at Spring Street, is also slated for development. About a block west, Donald Trump Jr. has plans for a 45-story condominium. An executive director of Eastern Consolidated, Eric Anton, who was a broker of the Moondance site, said the property was up for sale for about three months until the owners — a joint venture that includes developer Gary Barnett — decided to develop it themselves. Calls yesterday to Extell Development Corporation, which is headed by Mr. Barnett, were not returned. Mr. Barnett is also assembling a site three blocks north at 176 Avenue of the Americas, where a Sleepy's store is situated.

    "There are not going to be any more diners," the owner of Moondance Diner, Sunil "Sunny" Sharma, said. Inside the narrow restaurant, black-and-white photos of Yankees stars greet customers who come to enjoy milkshakes, handcut fries, homemade buttermilk onion rings, and burgers. The food is priced a bit higher than one might expect at a diner: Cole slaw is $2.95. He plans to discuss the possibility of opening the Moondance Diner anew on the commercial first floor of the residential building. In the meantime, he plans to hold on to the Moondance sign.

    A representative of Hudson Island LLC, the owner of the property, told The New York Sun ground will be broken this year and the current buildings razed. He said plans for the property, which is about 11,330 square feet and may be as tall as nine stories, were still being finalized, and that the Board of Standards and Appeals had approved the plans to build a 66,734-square-foot residential building there.

    Dick Blodgett of the Charlton Street Block Association did not comment on this building, but said the community is concerned that large buildings such as the one Mr. Trump is constructing at Spring and Varick streets are "outside the scale of the neighborhood." A member of the Van Dam Street Block Association, Silvia Beame, said, "We don't want to see the area become overdeveloped."

    Mr. Anton described the western part of SoHo as "in my mind, a more attractive place to live" than the center of SoHo, which can be crowded on the weekends. He said that being a little bit on the edge of SoHo is very attractive. Mr. Sweeney said he is concerned about a continuing trend of losing parking spaces and adding buildings with more residents.

    The executive director of the BSA, Jeff Mulligan, said the owners of the Moondance site received a variance for residential use. The city planning department spokeswoman said the area is ordinarily zoned for light manufacturing.

    For the near future, hungry tourists and residents will be able to continue enjoying the Moondance Diner, whose seats run along a corridor on which the words "Eat Here" are writ large. Mr. Sharma said he had his wedding celebration about five years ago at the diner. Come next year, instead of enjoying the food, new residents in the condominium may have to settle for kicking up their heels to Van Morrison's "Moondance":

    "Well, it's a marvelous night for a moondance
    With the stars up above in your eyes
    A fantabulous night to make romance
    'neath the cover of October skies."

    © 2007 The New York Sun, One SL, LLC.

  6. #1326
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    in Limbo
    Posts
    8,976

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by antinimby View Post
    Other planned developments include a 600,000-square-foot site located on the north side of West 28th Street stretching the entire block front of Eleventh Avenue between 28th and 29th streets. A second site is a 250,000-square-foot block-through site that spans the entire block front of Eleventh Avenue between 26th and 27th streets.
    These could be huge. Anyone know anything about them?

  7. #1327

    Default

    http://www.greenbergfarrow.com/Exper...ial/Commercial

    Go to "St Michaels." Anyone know anything? I believe the site is the far upper west side...around 100th st or so?

  8. #1328
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Manhattan - UWS
    Posts
    4,208

    Default

    ^ Interesting place for this tower. Yes It is on 100th street and Amsterdam Avenue.

  9. #1329
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Manhattan - UWS
    Posts
    4,208

    Default

    Here are the renderings...




    and its location...




  10. #1330
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Manhattan - UWS
    Posts
    4,208

    Default

    The big lot across the street on the West Side of the church is getting developed aswell.

  11. #1331
    Forum Veteran krulltime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Manhattan - UWS
    Posts
    4,208

    Default


    There are alot of new things going on that website like...


    Broadway & Sherman, New York, New York
    400,000 square feet (50,000 square feet of retail, 150,000 square feet of residential and 120,000 of office and attached parking)
    Completion TBD






    11 Broadway, New York, New York
    240,000 square feet (25,000 square feet of retail, 98 residential units, 200-room hotel)
    Completion TBD





    South 8th Street, New York, New York
    62,000 square feet, 20 stories
    54 condominiums
    2007 completion





    a new rendering for...

    West Park, New York, New York
    107,000 square feet (24,500 square feet community center, 71 residential units
    2007 completion


    Last edited by krulltime; February 19th, 2007 at 09:19 PM.

  12. #1332

    Default New Building

    Was wondering if anyone can help me out in identifying this condo and the official website for it. Appreciated.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	5515.jpg 
Views:	210 
Size:	98.1 KB 
ID:	3593   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	5511.jpg 
Views:	219 
Size:	34.2 KB 
ID:	3594   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	5513.jpg 
Views:	186 
Size:	59.1 KB 
ID:	3595  

  13. #1333
    Senior Swanky Peteynyc1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hell's Kitchen
    Posts
    732

    Default

    ^^^ That is 205 East 59th street, built last year. Its across from Bloomingdales on the 3rd Ave side. Not sure if they are completely sold out via sponsor, but certainly there are some available on the resale market.

    http://www.205e59.com

  14. #1334
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    NYC - Downtown
    Posts
    32,654

    Default

    Oy, those balconies at 205 E 59 ...

    It looks like it went up in the late '80s. What were they thinking?

  15. #1335
    Forum Veteran
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Battery Park City
    Posts
    1,199

    Default

    Two New High Rises Coming to WTC South

    Work may begin soon on a new West Street Tower Real estate development is on the rise in the area south of the World Trade Center, with two new towers recently added to the construction slate.
    The first is 50 West Street, located between West and Washington Streets at J.P. Ward Street (just north of the Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel Entrance). The project involves abatement and demolition of the location's three existing buildings, which will be replaced by a new 65-story residential tower and hotel. Pending abatement and demolition-plan approval by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other agencies, the developer hopes to begin several months of deconstruction work as soon as spring 2007, followed by 32 months of construction.
    Nearby at 111 Washington Street (at Carlisle Street), abatement and demolition of the parking garage and two neighboring buildings (numbers 109 and 107) are planned in the coming months. The project's start also depends on EPA approval, with plans to rebuild the site as a 50-story residential tower and hotel. The developer expects construction to last approximately two years.

    http://www.lowermanhattan.info/news/...ses_85333.aspx

Similar Threads

  1. Greenways and Waterfront Development
    By Edward in forum New York City Guide For New Yorkers
    Replies: 198
    Last Post: July 21st, 2015, 01:30 AM
  2. Astoria Development
    By Kris in forum Brooklyn, Queens, Bronx, and SI Real Estate
    Replies: 64
    Last Post: November 26th, 2014, 04:43 AM
  3. The Final Frontier for Development in Manhattan - Falling re
    By Fabb in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: June 18th, 2003, 05:16 PM
  4. 139 E. 34th Street - Building type, residential?
    By dvinfo in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: April 1st, 2003, 11:34 AM
  5. E 34th new development
    By tlowe in forum New York Real Estate
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: March 31st, 2003, 05:15 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


Google+ - Facebook - Twitter - Meetup

Edward's photos on Flickr - Wired New York on Flickr - In Queens - In Red Hook - Bryant Park - SQL Backup Software