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Thread: High Line Area Development

  1. #91
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    I just gotta say I'm sooooo glad I was able to live in Manhattan when it had some edges to it.

    While they might (stress might) be good for the city economy (gotta look at the big picture), all this new "luxury" housing (while sometimes beautiful to look at) is changing the City in a way that when I'm old and decrepit (and even grumpier than I am now) and tell stories of "how it was back then" the youngsters will find it hard to believe.

    Do I romanticize the grit of the past? You bet.

    But time do march on ...

  2. #92
    Build the Tower Verre antinimby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by saposapo View Post
    Too bad that you could not distinguish between an ad and art.
    No, not too bad for me as I'm sure most other people had a similar viewpoint.

    Says more about the failure of the artist to impart his work onto the general public.

  3. #93

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    "In 1970, prior to the rejuvenation of the district, Bayview's entire south wall was decorated with a red and pink abstract painting, called "Venus" by artist Knox Martin. The mural, conspicuous for its size and beauty, has often been used on post cards. It is also conspicuous - in a culture that regards large, exposed surface as prime advertising space - for not being a billboard. Not surprisingly, advertisers call from time to time with proposals to lease the wall for commercial messages, but Bayview doesn't want its beautiful Venus covered over with a beer or jeans ad."
    (From "History of Bayview", DOCS TODAY November 2001)

  4. #94
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Some pics from this week of the goings-on around the High Line ...

    Vesta24 (10th Avenue / W. 24th) ...

    South and east facade from the sidewalk below:



    The north facade:



    520 W. 27th (between 10th & 11th Aves) ...

    From the south on W. 26th:



    From W. 27th near 10th:



    Some lots in various states of demo, getting ready for new buildings ...

    SW corner of W. 23rd / 10th Avenue (former gas station):



    10th Avenue between W. 24th & W. 25th (with the High Line in the background):



    And a little shopfront on 10th Avenue near W. 21st ...


  5. #95

    Default 11th Avenue Demolition

    Recently the Taxi garages on 11th Avenue between 23rd and 24th were demolished. Does anyone know what's planned there?

  6. #96
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    On the High Line, Solitude Is Pretty Crowded


    Rendering by Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro/Courtesy the City of New York.
    Like moths to a flame, developers are being drawn to the yet-unbuilt High Line elevated garden.

    nytimes.com
    By NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF
    December 24, 2006

    WE New Yorkers have a morbid fascination with pinpointing the death of a neighborhood scene. You wonder, for example, exactly when the seeds were planted for SoHo’s grim destiny as an open-air mall. Was it 1971, when Leo Castelli opened his downtown gallery? The advent of Dean & Deluca’s overpriced cheeses? Victoria’s Secret underwear displays?

    But the artists who bemoaned SoHo’s gradual reinvention as a tourist mecca in the 1980s would have been dumbstruck by the pace of gentrification wrought by the High Line, an abandoned stretch of elevated railway tracks that will be transformed into a garden walkway from the meatpacking district to Chelsea.

    Even before local activists picked the project’s design team, Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro, two years ago, developers had begun circling the site like vultures. Today, the High Line risks being devoured by a string of developments, including a dozen or more luxury towers, a new branch of the Whitney Museum of American Art and a Standard Hotel. Already the area is a mix of the fashionable and the tacky, with tourists tottering from boutiques to nightclubs across its cobblestone streets, even as they recoil from the occasional whiff of raw meat.


    Polshek Partnership
    Polshek Partnership’s project for a Standard Hotel.

    Not all of these are run-of-the-mill development projects: they include potential designs by renowned talents including Renzo Piano and the Polshek Partnership. And even more promising, a few younger, relatively unknown talents like Neil Denari and Work Architecture are getting the opportunity to design major projects.

    But the frenzied activity surrounding the High Line shows how radically the development climate in Manhattan has accelerated. No longer content to allow gentrification to proceed at its own tentative pace, developers now view even the humblest civic undertaking as a potential gold mine. City planners who once had to coax developers to build in rundown neighborhoods are groping for strategies to keep them at bay. Pretty much everyone who has walked the length of the weed-choked High Line agrees that its magic arises largely from its isolation. Carving its way through the urban fabric two to three stories above ground, it is framed mostly by the backs of buildings and billboards, with occasional views opening out to the Hudson or across Manhattan.

    The battle to preserve that ambience is being waged street corner by street corner, foot by foot. Last summer the city announced its final zoning regulations for the area, a document that is reassuring for its meticulousness. The guidelines require setbacks to protect some major view corridors; at other points, buildings are allowed to shoot straight up to maintain the sense of compression that is part of the High Line’s charm. The core of several blocks, meanwhile, will remain zoned for manufacturing in the hope of maintaining some of the area’s character.

    In rare cases, the Department of City Planning has negotiated directly with developers and their architects on a particularly difficult site. In a design by Mr. Denari for a residential tower, city officials allowed him to cantilever his building several feet over the High Line to compensate for his site’s tiny footprint. In the rather dazzling result, the proposed tower gracefully bulges out over the elevated garden, a vertical tear appearing at its center as if the building were straining to squeeze into its allotted space. Views from the apartments would open up and down the length of the High Line. From below, the building would swell out over the garden walkway, adding a sense of vertigo.


    A preliminary design for the garden, with one of its public stairways;
    above far right, Neil Denari’s cantilevered apartment house design.

    But as long as they conform to the new zoning codes, the city will have little control over the form and appearance of most of the designs. And so far, few projects have risen to the standard of Mr. Denari’s. Even more crucial, perhaps, is the question of access. As Richard Scofidio, one of the architects of the High Line, put it: “We don’t want hotels putting wicker chairs and tables all over the garden. We want it to feel that it belongs to everybody.”

    Striving to maintain that feel, the city has wisely limited the number of entry points. It will create four public stairways between Gansevoort and 20th Streets in the first phase.

    Thankfully, the city has also limited the width of connections to the High Line from adjoining buildings to a maximum of five and a half feet. That way, any entry point from a specific building would function more as a bridge than an extension of the High Line.

    With guidelines in place, it will now be up to the Parks Department to determine which of the new buildings will get direct access to the garden. Already, many of the residential developers have sought permission to build lobbies that would open onto the High Line. This would undo the spirit of the project, giving residents of a few luxury towers a connection to the site that others would not share. They should use the public stairs like the rest of us.

    So far, there is no reason to doubt that the city will try to do the right thing.

    The partnership between city planners and High Line advocates has been one of the most sincere efforts in recent memory to protect the public interest from an onslaught of commercialization. And the Parks Department is working in partnership with Friends of the High Line, the nonprofit group that conceived the idea.

    But no planner can reverse the social and economic changes that are reconfiguring the city’s identity. And the question next year will be what happens on the ground, as the neighborhood fills up with the usual cellphone stores, health clubs and Starbucks. What kind of sanctuary will the High Line be? Are we simply deluding ourselves into believing we can slow the pace of the inevitable?

    Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company

  7. #97
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lofter1 View Post

    The CALEDONIA

    450 w. 17th St.

    This hulking thing is rising fast -- and we're only seeing the low-rise south wing at this point (the northern tower section is yet to come out of the ground) ...






  8. #98
    Disgruntled Optimist lofter1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by krulltime View Post

    245 10th Avenue:


    Designed 2005, Construction 2006-2008
    They're trying to dig the hole for this one but not much progress has been made (looks pretty much the same now as when i took this shot 1 month ago) ...


  9. #99

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    Quote Originally Posted by pioneer View Post
    Recently the Taxi garages on 11th Avenue between 23rd and 24th were demolished. Does anyone know what's planned there?
    At 200 11th ave a construction permit was filed for an 18 story/277' building. No rendering though.

  10. #100

    Default Sneak peak at Nouvel's 19th and 11th Ave Building

    Looks pretty cool.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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  11. #101

    Default this looks like the took Fred Sanford's junkyard and built a condo

    or they used the leftovers from Pella Windows scrap yard and slapped em up.



    http://www.curbed.com/archives/2007/...eventh_ave.php

  12. #102

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    It looks stunning.

  13. #103

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    It's interesting.

    How tall will it be?

    It would be nice if it has a slanted roof or a crown.

  14. #104
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    According to today's NYPost article it will be 21 floors (roughly 230-250ft?) This is going to look stunning on the West Side Highway next to IAC and the upcoming Robert AM Stern building further South.

  15. #105

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    ^ Walled City of Kowloon.

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