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STT757
September 23rd, 2003, 10:42 PM
Giants and NJSEA Reach Agreement

Deal paves way for renovations, possible Super Bowl for Giants Stadium.

By Michael Eisen, Giants.com

September 23, 2003

East Rutherford, N.J. - The Giants and the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority today reached an agreement in principle that resolves a long standing disagreement relative to the extent of renovations to be done to Giants Stadium and who would pay for them. The renovations - which will not require any new taxpayer dollars - make it possible for Giants Stadium to remain in contention as a potential Super Bowl host.

"We think it's a good deal for the state, certainly for the Giants and certainly for Giants fans, because it gives us a mechanism for renovating Giants Stadium and bringing it up to a state-of-the-art condition, without any taxpayer dollars being spent,"
- Giants COO John Mara
A memorandum of understanding, that will become the basis for a new lease arrangement keeping the Giants at Giants Stadium until 2026, will require the Giants to renovate Giants Stadium at their own expense while leaving management of and scheduling for non-NFL events with the NJSEA.

"We think it's a good deal for the state, certainly for the Giants and certainly for Giants fans, because it gives us a mechanism for renovating Giants Stadium and bringing it up to a state-of-the-art condition, without any taxpayer dollars being spent," said Giants executive vice president and chief operating officer John Mara. "The end result of that is we will have a much better venue for our fans to be able to watch the games."

Mara said he in an "ideal world" the renovations would begin following the 2004 NFL season and take approximately two years to complete.

The renovations will include the widening of concourses, and the installation of club seats and additional suites.

"We have reached an agreement that resolves our concerns about protecting the interests of New Jersey taxpayers," said NJSEA President George Zoffinger. "Significant renovations will be made to Giants Stadium that will satisfy the Giants' interest in significant physical improvements to Giants Stadium without using a penny from taxpayers. The Authority will continue to be able to attract and schedule the spectacular kinds of non-NFL events that brought in nearly a million people in 2003 alone. In addition, the renovations will make Giants Stadium more attractive for a Super Bowl bid."

There are no guarantees that Giants Stadium will host a Super Bowl. That decision is made by the NFL's 32 owners. But they would not have considering putting the league's premier event in the stadium without the renovations agreed upon today.

For the Giants, the extra revenue they will derive as a result of the agreement will improve their chances of fielding a championship team.

"We think that this deal gives us the opportunity to remain competitive with the other teams in the league," Mara said. "The Super Bowl is a nice side benefit that we now have a chance to achieve."

The agreement shifts revenues to the Giants, along with the responsibility to maintain and pay all operating expenses for the stadium throughout the term of the lease. The Giants are required under the agreement to pay the NJSEA an annual fee for use of the stadium, with adjustments every three years in accordance with fluctuations in the Cost Price Index. In addition, the NJSEA will retain 50% of non-NFL revenues and will receive a percentage of any naming rights payments by the Giants during the term of the lease.

Zoffinger said the agreement was consistent with the mandate given him by New Jersey Gov. James McGreevey. He said the governor insisted that he make every effort to draw the 2008 Super Bowl to New Jersey without additional costs to the taxpayers and without ceding any control of the Meadowlands facility that would limit the quality or quantity of non-NFL events.

Gov. McGreevey said he was pleased with his understanding of the proposed agreement and applauded both the NJSEA and the Giants for their efforts in bringing the negotiations to a positive conclusion.

"I believe the agreement is not just a good deal, but is good public policy," McGreevey said. "I appreciate that the Giants not only found a way to meet their needs but also respected ours.

"I told George (Zoffinger) that I expected him to handle the negotiations in a fiscally-responsible, businesslike manner," McGreevey said. "I told him I wanted to get a deal done that would not bruise any taxpayer pocketbooks but that would make Giants Stadium the absolute best venue for the 2008 Super Bowl. Together, both sides seem to have accomplished just that.

"These new privately-funded stadium renovations, coupled with the scheduled opening of the Xanadu development and our new rail link access, should make the Meadowlands complex an ideal setting not just for the Super Bowl for an unlimited assortment of world class sports and entertainment options well into the 21st Century," he said.

http://www.giants.com

NYatKNIGHT
September 24th, 2003, 11:03 AM
As a NY Giants season ticket holder I'm glad for the renovations, but this new agreement that "will require the Giants to renovate Giants Stadium at their own expense" means only one thing to me; that the fans will pay for a lot of it. Every renovation or stadium improvement so far has been preceded by higher ticket prices, higher concession prices and higher parking fees. :x

Zoe
September 24th, 2003, 12:40 PM
While it is unfortunate that the owners of this team will most likely pass the expense on to the fans that visit the stadium, it is far better than having tax payers foot the bill. I do not watch sporting events and while I do recognize some of the positive economic impacts that a project like this can have on an area, the money could be far better spent on other infrastructure projects that effect the greater population.

NYatKNIGHT
September 24th, 2003, 02:47 PM
Well I definitely agree with that. I'm only complaining that "their own expense" is passed on to the fans one way or another.

When I lived in Denver the citizens voted to foot the bill for a new Mile High Stadium. They continuously blocked efforts for other new projects despite the fact that the state ranks near the bottom on every list from test scores to poverty. Revamp health care? Expand rail service? Build new schools? No! But a stadium for the Broncos equipped with luxery boxes and louder sound system? Of course! I hear what you're saying Zoe.

Kris
July 9th, 2004, 09:36 AM
July 9, 2004

Giants Consider Building New Meadowlands Stadium

By RICHARD LEZIN JONES

NEWARK, July 8 - The president of the agency that owns Giants Stadium confirmed on Thursday that it and the New York Giants were "taking a look" at building a new stadium.

George R. Zoffinger, president of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, said that the team was also looking into the option of making extensive renovations to add more premium seating and other amenities to the stadium, which is 28 years old.

According to current estimates, renovations to the stadium could cost about $300 million. Building a new stadium - the team and the authority are considering a site within a half-mile of Giants Stadium - could cost about $600 million.

"The thought was that this is one of the things we should look at, since we're spending a lot of money already," Mr. Zoffinger said in an interview. "That's all we're doing is taking a look."

Mr. Zoffinger said that by this fall the team and the authority should arrive at a decision.

Word that the move was being considered was reported Thursday in The Record of Hackensack.

If the authority proceeds with plans for a new stadium, it will join a collection of three other major sports construction projects being planned in the New York area.

The Jets, the team that has shared Giants Stadium with the Giants since 1984, is vying for its own 75,000-seat, $1.4 billion stadium on the West Side of Manhattan. Officials with the New Jersey Nets are planning a basketball arena in Brooklyn, and New Jersey Devils executives are eyeing a hockey arena in Newark.

Officials with the Giants said their decision on a Meadowlands stadium would not hinge on the fate of the Jets' West Side project, which is well along in planning but has been criticized for its location and cost to taxpayers.

"I don't really think it affects us one way or the other," said John K. Mara, the Giants' executive vice president. "This is a big enough market that it can support two stadiums."

Mr. Mara said the team's concerns went beyond the mere cost of building a new stadium.

"If we do a renovation, parts of the building are still going to be 28 years old," he said. Mr. Mara noted that other factors to consider are possible seat removal in a renovation or logistical issues raised by a new project.

"We want to do our due diligence," Mr. Mara said.

Paying for whatever changes take place at the Giants Stadium is also a consideration. Although the Jets' plan calls for $600 million of the new stadium's cost to be financed with state and city money, both Mr. Zoffinger and Gov. James E. McGreevey have repeatedly said that they would not use tax dollars to subsidize sports construction projects.

Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

Kris
November 11th, 2004, 06:43 AM
November 11, 2004

Turnover in Trenton, and Hope for Stadium

By RONALD SMOTHERS

NEWARK, Nov. 10 - Calling it a "new vision" for the Meadowlands sports complex, State Senator Richard J. Codey, who will take over as New Jersey's acting governor next week, is exploring a plan that would allow the New York Giants to build a new stadium there.

Through a spokeswoman, Kelley Heck, Senator Codey, an avid sports fan, said on Wednesday that he was open to the idea of a new stadium to replace the current 28-year-old stadium. The team would pay the bulk of the estimated $850 million price tag, but the state would be willing to shoulder some of the cost, a state official involved with the discussions said.

The plan represents a sharp departure from outgoing Gov. James E. McGreevey's adamant opposition to using public funds for sports venues.

Senator Codey said through Ms. Heck that "this is a new vision for the Meadowlands. I say this recognizing that a deal will still need to be struck with the state and any of the teams involved."

The proposal for a new stadium, first reported Wednesday by The Star-Ledger of Newark, will represent a change in the team's plans for the site.

The team was close to finishing a plan for a $375 million renovation of the stadium with the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, which owns and operates the stadium. Under the plan, the team would finance the renovation, but the sports authority would retain its control of the stadium and a share of the revenues. But that plan was never the team's first choice. The team preferred to build a new stadium that the team would own, according to team officials who spoke on the condition of anonymity.

The McGreevey administration took a hard line in talks with the Giants, seeking to guard the authority's control of the stadium and the revenue it generates. But with Mr. McGreevey's impending resignation, scheduled for Nov. 15, and Mr. Codey's assumption of the office for the 14 months remaining in Mr. McGreevey's term, the Giants have a more willing listener in Trenton.

George Zoffinger, president of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, said in recent weeks that officials with the Giants had told him that they wanted to re-examine the potential for a new stadium. He said Mr. McGreevey would have been open to the idea of a new stadium, but remained firmly opposed to using public funds.

"But Codey and I have been speaking with the Giants, who are our primary tenants, and we want to work together," he said.

John Mara, a member of the family that co-owns the Giants with Robert Tisch, said, "I hope to be meeting with the governor in the next few weeks, and we will share our ideas directly with him."

The Meadowlands is the site of a horse racing track, the Continental Airlines Arena and the stadium. The race track has been struggling financially. The New Jersey Nets and the Devils, who now call the arena home, plan to move elsewhere. The Nets' new owners plan to move the team to an arena planned for Brooklyn, and the new owners of the Devils hope the team will play in an arena planned for Newark.

The stadium has long been the jewel of the Meadowlands, and while the Giants claim the 76,000-seat stadium as their home field, it is also home to the New York Jets and the Metro Stars of Major League Soccer. The Jets' lease expires in 2007, and New York City is considering a plan to build a stadium for the team on Manhattan's West Side. The Metro Stars have been negotiating a move to a proposed stadium of their own in Harrison, N.J., but financing for such a project has not been assured.

The McGreevey administration recently approved plans to build a $1.3 billion sports and family entertainment complex at the Meadowlands called Meadowlands Xanadu, which would be adjacent to the stadium site on land around Continental Arena.

Mr. Zoffinger said Xanadu, a project scheduled for completion in 2007 that he had personally championed, would not be affected by discussions over a new stadium. But Giants officials have long expressed concern about the impact of the new complex on parking on game days and are expected to press those concerns in any discussions with the Codey administration, said one team official who spoke on the condition of anonymity.

Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

Kris
December 21st, 2004, 11:54 PM
December 22, 2004

Giants Offer to Pay for Stadium; Ask Full Control and No Rent

By RONALD SMOTHERS and RICHARD SANDOMIR

NEWARK, Dec. 21 - The owners of the New York Giants have offered to pay the entire cost, estimated at $700 million, to build a stadium for the football team on state land at the Meadowlands, in return for operating the stadium rent-free and controlling all events there year round, a team official said Tuesday.

"We are prepared to go the new stadium route, provided we reach the right agreement," said John Mara, confirming the latest development in weeks of negotiations between the team and the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, the state-created agency that owns the land and the sporting complexes at the Meadowlands.

The proposal, first reported in The Star-Ledger of Newark, comes as Acting Governor Richard J. Codey is scheduled to meet on Wednesday with the team owners and sports authority officials as part of the ongoing negotiations to make a stadium deal.

The plan represents a shift in the team's position. Earlier it had asked the state to contribute to the construction of a stadium. Under that proposal, the new stadium, like the one there now, would remain under state ownership and would be leased to the team for the football season.

A spokesman for Mr. Codey, Sean Darcy, would not comment on Mr. Mara's proposal, except to say that the negotiations were continuing. Carl Goldberg, the chairman of the Sports and Exposition Authority, who has been the lead state negotiator with the Giants, and George Zoffinger, the president of the authority, also declined to discuss details of the talks.

Asked about the effect of the reports on the talks scheduled for Wednesday, Mr. Goldberg said, "We have a meeting with an agenda of items to be discussed, and I contemplate going through those without any impact from these reports whatsoever."

Mr. Mara would not discuss details of the talks either, but some officials involved in the negotiations said state officials were balking at the Giants' insistence on control of all events in the stadium and their proposal to use it without paying rent.

The Giants, who have been insisting that their 28-year-old stadium is outdated, had been in negotiations with the sports authority over a proposal to invest $300 million in renovation of the existing stadium. With Gov. James E. McGreevey adamant about not putting state dollars into sports projects, team officials resigned themselves to a renovation deal, even though they really wanted a new stadium.

The McGreevey administration, instead, put its political clout - and tax dollars - behind a $1.3 billion plan to broaden the use of the Meadowlands from sports - football, basketball and horse racing - to a family entertainment and retail complex called Meadowlands Xanadu. With the resignation of Mr. McGreevey and the arrival of Acting Governor Codey in November, the talks shifted. Mr. Codey, who is also the president of the State Senate, is an avowed sports fan, and he immediately indicated that he favored the primary use of the Meadowlands as a sports complex.

In particular, Mr. Codey said he would support construction of a stadium for the Giants in the Meadowlands, provided the financial details could be worked out.

State and team officials said that the Giants' latest proposal is a significant development. It calls for the state to issue tax-exempt bonds to raise construction money, which the team would repay out of stadium revenues.

But among the many other details of the deal, there is much that must be worked out. For one thing, state officials would have to be persuaded to break precedent and allow a stadium that is completely privately financed to be built on state land, with all its revenue and expenses controlled by the team.

The deal would also have to consider past sports authority insistence on sharing revenues from luxury boxes and club seats and controlling naming rights and off-season bookings of events like concerts.

The deal would also have to consider repayment of $117 million in outstanding state-backed debt on the existing stadium; the Giants are silent on the issue in their new proposal, one official said.

Two state officials said that it would be difficult to grant the team sweeping control of the stadium if the state backed the construction bonds.

Other questions remain about development in the Meadowlands. The Giants and state officials have been concerned about parking for both the stadium and visitors to the planned Xanadu Meadowlands. Under current arrangements, state officials said, the Giants have a virtual veto over development in the stadium's vicinity that could affect or diminish parking space on game days.

Mr. Goldberg, when asked about the issues, said, "I would presume that if we are not able to come to a conclusion on construction of a new stadium, then we would revisit the renovation proposal as an alternative."

But, he added, "That is not on the table at this point."

Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

Kris
December 22nd, 2004, 11:47 PM
December 23, 2004

Governor and Giants Meet on Plan for a New Stadium

By LAURA MANSNERUS and RICHARD SANDOMIR

TRENTON, Dec. 22 - Acting Gov. Richard J. Codey, in a continuing personal effort to revitalize the sports complex in the Meadowlands, met with officials of the New York Giants on Wednesday to discuss the team's proposal to build its own new stadium there.

Mr. Codey would not disclose any details of the meeting, his press secretary, Kelley Heck, said. But several participants, while also declining to discuss the negotiations, said they were productive and would resume soon after the New Year.

Carl J. Goldberg, the chairman of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority and the state's lead negotiator, said, "I feel very strongly that there's the highest likelihood of coming to a successful conclusion."

Mr. Codey supports the Giants' proposal to replace its 28-year-old stadium at its own expense, estimated at $700 million, rather than renovating it as previously planned. The new stadium would be built on a parcel next to the old one.

But the team and the state remain at odds over whether the Giants should continue to pay rent to the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, the owner of the property. The Giants also want greater control over revenues, naming rights and off-season bookings, and are seeking a guarantee of 30,000 surface parking spaces during games.

Participants in the discussions denied earlier reports that the team was asking the state to issue construction bonds for the project, which would have made it more difficult to cede control over the stadium to the team.

One participant in the discussions said that under the Giants' proposal the state would receive more in state taxes - which would increase considerably with new luxury suites, club seats, restaurants, concessions and retail sales - than it currently collects in rent from the team.

While the Giants' lease does not expire until 2026, the team and the Sports Authority are eager to reach an agreement, especially since construction is to begin as early as next month on Meadowlands Xanadu, a huge retail and entertainment complex adjacent to the stadium.

The Xanadu project includes a 4,000-space parking deck on property that the Giants currently use for surface parking on game days. The parking deck is scheduled for construction as soon as the developers, the Mills Corporation and the Mack-Cali Realty Corporation, receive their one outstanding environmental permit, from the Army Corps of Engineers.

Copyright 2004 The New York Times Company

Kris
January 8th, 2005, 06:49 AM
January 8, 2005

In Shift, New Jersey Offers to Pay Debt on Giants Stadium, to Pave Way for New One

By RONALD SMOTHERS

NEWARK, Jan. 7 - In a major policy shift, state officials are proposing to pay the $117 million in remaining debt on Giants Stadium to pave the way for a new one.

State officials had planned to use millions of dollars in lease payments from the developers of a planned Meadowlands shopping and entertainment complex, Meadowlands Xanadu, to pay off the state's debt on the neighboring Continental Arena and save taxpayers $90 million in interest.

But public and private officials involved in the talks between the state and the Giants over a new football stadium at the Meadowlands said yesterday that Carl Goldberg, chairman of New Jersey's Sports and Exposition Authority, told team officials that the state would be willing to use the Xanadu lease payments to pay off the debt on the 28-year-old stadium.

Though that debt is owed by the state, Mr. Goldberg had until now insisted that the team shoulder some or all of the debt in exchange for the state's backing of the team's plan to build a $700 million, 80,000-seat stadium on state land rent-free.

Mr. Goldberg did not return repeated calls to both his offices, and officials in the office of Acting Governor Richard J. Codey declined to confirm the proposal, which was first reported on Friday in The Star-Ledger.

Officials familiar with the negotiations said the proposal was put forward as an inducement to remove opposition to Xanadu among team officials who, under their current lease with the state, have a virtual veto over Xanadu because it could disrupt game-day traffic, attendance and parking.

The $1.3 billion Xanadu project would be situated adjacent to the sports complex and has been billed by its developers as the "ultimate sports, leisure, family entertainment and shopping complex in the United States."

John Mara, chief executive officer of the Giants, would not comment on the proposal, saying only that the negotiations were continuing. He said talks were also under way between traffic consultants hired by the team and the Meadowlands Xanadu developers on whether the two projects "can coexist at all." He called that the most significant issue.

Other team officials suggested that Mr. Goldberg's offer was not likely to be an inducement to them. One team official called it "no real concession," adding that the sports authority's insistence that they help with what was "a state debt and not a team debt" was merely "a nuisance" in the negotiations.

The shift by the state highlighted what can happen with a change in governors.

Under Gov. James E. McGreevey, the Xanadu project and paying off the Continental Arena debt was the priority. As recently as last October, Mr. McGreevey hailed the Xanadu project and held up a giant replica of a $160 million check from its developers, the advance on 15 years of lease payments he said would pay off the arena. But under Mr. Codey, an avid sports fan, keeping the Giants and their fans happy has become a priority.

A spokesman for the Mills Corporation and Mack-Cali, developers of the proposed Meadowlands Xanadu with its indoor ski slope, surfing pool, multiscreen movie theaters, mini-racing oval and related retail operations, conceded as much. Bob Sommer, the spokesman, said, "If the change in government, polices and priorities means a new focus on the stadium, it's fine with us. We don't oppose it."

Copyright 2005 The New York Times Company

Kris
February 9th, 2005, 11:59 PM
February 10, 2005

New Jersey in Talks With Giants and Jets

By RONALD SMOTHERS

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/dropcap/n.gifEWARK, Feb. 9 - New Jersey officials reported progress on Wednesday in talks with the New York Giants over a new stadium at the Meadowlands, while they also reached out to the New York Jets to persuade them to stay in New Jersey for at least 10 more years.

"A whole host of additional items were resolved" during a three-hour meeting over a new $700 million, 80,000-seat stadium to be financed by the Giants, said officials with the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, which operates the Meadowlands sports complex.

Carl Goldberg, the authority's chairman, refused to discuss details, but said that the parties were scheduled to talk more on Friday.

However, other officials said that the major movement had been on nonfinancial items, including the Giants' insistence that a $1.3 billion family entertainment and retail complex scheduled to be their neighbor be closed on game days to prevent traffic and parking problems.

According to those officials, the Giants accepted the authority's position that they could not require the huge Meadowlands Xanadu complex to close.

"We are landlords for both the Giants and Xanadu and have an obligation to both of these critical tenants to show that not only can they coexist together, but can flourish together," Mr. Goldberg said.

Meanwhile, authority officials and Acting Gov. Richard J. Codey met with the owners of the New York Jets. The Jets currently share Giants Stadium with the Giants, but the team is pursuing construction of a home stadium on the Far West Side of Manhattan. That effort has encountered legal and political challenges.

George Zoffinger, president and chief executive of the authority, said that the conversation with the Jets concerned a lawsuit over the issue of rent paid by the Jets to play at the Meadowlands. State officials sought resolution of the dispute to help persuade the team to continue to play in New Jersey for at least the next 10 years.

"We made the offer because we want to have good relations with them while they are here," Mr. Zoffinger said. "They will consider our offer, but they were very clear that although we would like for them to stay, they wanted to continue to pursue the West Side stadium."

Privately, consultants for New Jersey say that the best deal for the state would involve a new Meadowlands stadium used by both the Jets and the Giants. According to officials who spoke on the condition of anonymity, the consultant reports say that would prevent the state agency from being held hostage by one team or the other and would generate more revenue.

The Giants and the authority have inched closer in recent weeks to an agreement that would allow the construction of the new stadium. The state and team had agreed to renovate the existing stadium, but when Mr. Codey took office last November, he signaled his desire to see sporting events remain the dominant focus of the Meadowlands, and the push for a new 80,000-seat stadium began.

His predecessor, James E. McGreevey, had pushed in another direction, introducing Meadowlands Xanadu, a retail, family entertainment and sporting complex that would include indoor ski jumps, surfing pools, Formula racing and other activities, to the area.

John Mara, the Giants' executive vice president, and other Giants executives dusted off plans for a new stadium, as well as a Giants Hall of Fame building, on a larger piece of property. Mr. Codey assigned Mr. Goldberg to lead the negotiations, in place of Mr. Zoffinger, who had been one of the main forces behind the Meadowlands Xanadu project.

The team soon went from calling for state financing of the stadium to offering to build it with its own money in exchange for a token rent to the state. When Mr. Goldberg balked at the token rent, the talks seemed to be at an impasse.

But last week Mr. Mara returned to the negotiations and offered to build the stadium at team expense and to pay the authority a rent of $6.3 million a year. Currently the agency receives $18 million in rent and percentages from concessions and nonsporting events at the stadium.

"It is a far cry from the zero that they were offering for rent some weeks ago," Mr. Goldberg said, adding that "an enormous amount of progress had been made" in the talks.

For his part, Mr. Goldberg had begun to accept Mr. Mara's contention that the Giants and the new stadium deal should not be burdened with the authority's concern about paying off $117 million in debt on the existing 28-year-old stadium. Mr. Mara had insisted that the stadium was owned by the authority and the debt associated with it should be paid off by the authority.

By last week, Mr. Goldberg said he had come around to the view that any deal with the Giants should be based on the value of the real estate on which they wanted to build and not on the broader financial situation and obligations of the agency.

"At the very onset of the negotiations I incorrectly made a connection between the new stadium and retiring the debt on the old stadium," Mr. Goldberg said. "But now I see that no outstanding obligations of the authority should be included as part of any ground lease for the new stadium. I'm not sure you will see any other team in the country making a 100 percent private investment in construction of a stadium and it is appropriate for us to recognize that in negotiating the lease terms."

Earlier this week, the Giants said that in an effort to help raise money, they were willing to sell the naming rights to the new stadium they are hoping to build for as much as $100 million.

Copyright 2005 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html) The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)

Kris
February 15th, 2005, 10:02 AM
February 15, 2005

New Jersey to Offer Plan for Jets-Giants Stadium

By RONALD SMOTHERS

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/dropcap/n.gifEWARK, Feb. 14 - With the prospect of a new Manhattan stadium for the New York Jets still uncertain, New Jersey officials are increasingly extolling the virtues of building a new stadium in the Meadowlands that could house both the Jets and the New York Giants.

Officials are expected to present a proposal on Wednesday to board members of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority portraying the financial benefits of a shared stadium to both teams, as well as to the state, according to one official who spoke on the condition of anonymity.

The idea of a shared stadium is emerging as the state authority continues to negotiate with the Giants over a replacement for the team's 28-year-old stadium in the Meadowlands. The existing stadium, which is owned by the state, is shared by the Giants and Jets. But the Jets have been seeking a new stadium on the West Side of Manhattan, while the Giants have said they would stay in New Jersey in a new $700-million stadium they want to build on a larger plot of land near the current site.

John Mara, president of the Giants, would not comment on his possible endorsement of a plan to build a new stadium that would be jointly owned and used by the two football teams. But he said that the Jets would be welcome as a tenant at the envisioned new Giants-owned stadium.

For their part, officials of the Jets insist that they are still aggressively pursuing construction of a West Side stadium. But in recent days, key legislative leaders have said that New York City should not build a $1.7 billion stadium unless it is awarded the 2012 Olympics - something which will not be determined until a July meeting of the International Olympics Committee.

Carl Goldberg, chairman of the New Jersey sports authority, said that one of the challenges of his talks with the Giants has been to come up with a stadium plan that accommodates Mr. Mara while maintaining "a flexibility" to accommodate the Jets should they decide to stay in the Meadowlands longer than they had planned.

One state official said that the ideal arrangment would be a new stadium on authority land, financed equally by the teams. As owners, each team would be able to keep all of the range of revenues from their games, including luxury boxes, advertising and concessions, while the state would gain the rights and revenues from leasing the stadium during the off season for nonsporting events.

Copyright 2005 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html) The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)

ZippyTheChimp
March 9th, 2005, 11:58 PM
March 10, 2005

Stadium Deal Falls Apart for New Jersey and the Giants

By RICHARD SANDOMIR (http://query.nytimes.com/search/query?ppds=bylL&v1=RICHARD SANDOMIR&fdq=19960101&td=sysdate&sort=newest&ac=RICHARD SANDOMIR&inline=nyt-per)
http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/dropcap/t.gifhe New York Giants said that their deal to build a privately financed $700 million Meadowlands stadium collapsed yesterday when New Jersey officials added two last-minute conditions that the team insisted were unacceptable.

"I thought we'd be here to announce a deal, but it blew apart today," Joe Shenker, an outside lawyer for the team, said during a meeting with reporters.

The team thought until early in the day that a final issue raised by Acting Gov. Richard J. Codey - a $3 million payment the state would get if the Jets did not build a stadium on the Far West Side of Manhattan and were co-tenants in a new Giants facility - had been settled and that it would announce a final agreement with the state.

But the talks fell apart over the state's refusal to guarantee that there would be no special taxes imposed in the future on stadium revenues and its insistence on a separate agreement clearing the way for Meadowlands Xanadu, an entertainment and retail park that is to be built near the stadium.

The team's executive vice president and chief operating officer, John Mara, and Steve Tisch, whose father, Robert, is the Giants' co-owner, said they were frustrated by a turn of events that blindsided them. They said they had agreed to all of the state's economic demands, primarily its request for $6.3 million in annual rent, rather than the nominal $1 the team had proposed.

Mr. Tisch said that there were 17 drafts of the agreement with the state.

"Seventeen times the goal line has moved, and each time we reluctantly moved," he said, then added, "We've gone as far as we can or will go."

Mr. Codey played down the Giants' anger with the late twists in the talks and said in a news conference at the Meadowlands Race Track that he believed a deal was "close" but was not confident that it could be completed.

Mr. Mara said that he would reluctantly listen to any pitch that might come from the ownership of the Jets, who are fighting to preserve their plan to build a $1.7 billion stadium that would require $600 million in public financing.

"If that overture is made in the future, we'd have to listen," Mr. Mara said. He added that the team's intention was to stay in New Jersey.

Mr. Codey said he doubted that the Giants would ever move to Manhattan.

The first issue added to yesterday's negotiations was Mr. Codey's refusal to rule out letting any of his successors try to tax revenue-generating activities at the new stadium. In his current budget proposal, a tax is suggested on luxury suites. He told team officials that he would drop it from the budget, but they nonetheless fear that such a tax could be enacted on suites, club seats or tickets, and would jeopardize the Giants' ability to pay its debt service.

In addition, the team said that its memorandum of understanding with the state on the stadium required that any additional taxes levied on stadium revenues would be offset against the rent the team will pay. In the late afternoon, Mr. Codey called team officials to say that even if $5 million or more in taxes were levied, the most the team could reduce its rent by would be $1.9 million a year.

After his appearance at the track, Mr. Codey said by telephone, "If a future legislature approved a tax, don't you think the team would pass it on to its customers?" He said that team executives "had gotten into a lather" when they learned of the proposed luxury tax in the budget.

The second issue that angered the Giants was the state's insistence that it immediately sign off on a separate agreement with the developers of Meadowlands Xanadu. The team said that it would not surrender a provision in the memorandum of understanding calling for a 30-day period, after a final stadium agreement with the state, to negotiate how the new stadium would coexist with Xanadu on Giants game days, largely in terms of parking and traffic.

"We want to work out an agreement where we can operate and they can operate, without gridlock," Mr. Mara said. The team said the deal with the Mills Corporation and Mack-Cali was contingent on a signed stadium agreement.

But the Giants can reduce their lease, which expires in 2026, by 10 years if Xanadu construction starts without their consent.

A member of the board of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, speaking on the condition of anonymity, said the new conditions added by Mr. Codey reflected criticism by board members that the Giants agreement was a giveaway that the state could not afford.

The team also has a clause in its current lease, which was extended in 1995, that Mr. Mara and Mr. Tisch said would cost the sports authority, which owns Giants Stadium, hundreds of millions of dollars to upgrade the facility to be "competitive with newly constructed or renovated" stadiums around the National Football League. Those improvements would include modern luxury suites, new scoreboards, sound and lighting systems, locker rooms and concession stands.

The authority has said it could make the "reasonable periodic alterations" required by the lease for much less than the team's estimate.

Mr. Mara said that the team's hopes of having a new stadium for the 2008 season were over. "Only a miracle can save it," he said. "This really reduces my appetite for doing a deal."

Any delays, he said, would raise the cost of the stadium because of annual increases in construction costs. He and Mr. Tisch also said that it has always been crucial for the Giants to be able to start selling luxury suites and club seats before any other new sports facilities, such as the new arena that has been proposed for Brooklyn, or the Jets' stadium, are in a position to compete.


Copyright 2005 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html) The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)

Ninjahedge
March 10th, 2005, 08:49 AM
Both sides are bieing intractable in this.

Seriously, if the Giants were worried about this, they could simply put in a clause that the "rent" was actually just a minimum tax base.


I think agreeing to a fixed payment for all perpetuity is not reasonable, and I don't think "sneaking" in a megalith like Xanadu (what a stupid name) into the deal is fair either.

The developers that are helping the Giants and their owners are trying to get some awfully big extras in in the same package with something they know the state is favorable towards.


I hate the fact that nothing can just be simply agreed apon these days. If one side seems to agree too quick, the other keeps pushing to see how much more they can get out of them, and vice versa.

ZippyTheChimp
March 10th, 2005, 10:55 AM
What's wrong with Xanadu. It worked for Orson Welles. :)

STT757
March 10th, 2005, 04:55 PM
Im a Jersey guy (although born in NYC) and Im a fan of both the Giants and Jets (probably lean towards the Jets though) however I hate the Meadowlands.

Im thinking with this latest development and the difficulties the Jets are having with their West Side Stadium that perhaps it would be in boths team's interests to work together and get a stadium deal done privately with no public money.

The Jets have proposed to spend $800 Million towards the construction of the West Side stadium, the $800 Million would go towards the construction of the actual structure but would not include the platform or the roof.

The City was/is going to pay $300 Million and the State were/are going to pay $300 Million to cover the costs of the roof and platform above the rail yard over which the stadium will be built.

The Giant's meanwhile have been proposing spending between $600-800 Million of privately financed money they will secure to build a new Giant's stadium.

If the Giants and Jets combine their resources they would be able to build the West Side stadium with absolutely no public funds, which makes getting the project built easier but it also makes it more lucrative for both teams.

Owning the Stadium outright would mean being able to rent out the stadiums space for Javit's Center events, as well as being able to pocket all sales from the stadium.

Kris
March 11th, 2005, 12:57 PM
March 11, 2005

With the Giants Mentioning Manhattan, New Jersey Takes Stadium Dispute to Court

By DAVID KOCIENIEWSKI


TRENTON, March 10 - With the New York Giants dangling the possibility of leaving New Jersey for the proposed West Side stadium in Manhattan, state officials went to court on Thursday to show that they will not allow the team to break its lease in the Meadowlands, which runs through 2026.


New Jersey officials and the Giants have negotiated for five months over a plan that would release team owners from the current lease and allow them to build and operate a $700 million stadium on the Meadowlands site. The two sides appeared to be near an agreement on Wednesday, but a team owner, Wellington Mara, said that two last-minute concessions sought by the state had undermined the deal and persuaded the Giants to consider leaving New Jersey altogether.


Acting Gov. Richard J. Codey tried to ratchet down the rhetoric Thursday morning, saying he hoped the two sides could still strike an agreement that would enable the team to build its stadium and remain in New Jersey. By midday, however, lawyers for the state filed papers in Bergen County Superior Court, saying the Giants' proposal for the new stadium was "onerous and unfair" to taxpayers and asking a judge to clarify the extent of improvements necessary to make the Giants' current stadium state of the art, as the lease requires.


Giants officials have said that to meet that standard, the state must make $300 million in improvements to build luxury boxes, club seats and other amenities. State officials say less than $100 million in renovations will be required. In its filing, the state asked the judge to clarify the meaning of "state of the art" and asserted that the team and the National Football League should pick up part of the cost of any renovations.


Coming at a time when the Jets are discussing a stadium on the West Side of Manhattan, it was unclear whether the breakdown in the talks was a sign of insurmountable differences or negotiating brinkmanship. Asked about the prospect of the Giants making their home at the proposed stadium in Manhattan, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg said Thursday that he considered the team's interest another sign of the project's merit. But he stopped short of saying he considered the move likely.


"The public's interest, all of the sudden since the story was floated, shows you just how sports fans react - they would like to see lots of teams here," Mr. Bloomberg said. "But let's see how that plays out."


Joe Shenker, a lawyer for the Giants, said the team's owners would rather remain in New Jersey. But Mr. Shenker said the owners were shocked when, during the final hours of the negotiations, state officials refused to guarantee that there would be no special taxes imposed on stadium revenues in the future. The state also insisted that the team give its immediate approval to the Xanadu entertainment and retail complex to be built near the stadium. Giants officials worry that traffic from the complex might interfere with stadium traffic on game days, and in previous negotiations with the state had been promised a 30-day window during which to reach a separate agreement with the Xanadu owners.


Mr. Shenker said the team would now weigh all options.


Mr. Shenker declined to discuss the state's court action, saying he had not had time to study the legal papers.


The negotiations come at an important time for Mr. Codey, who has had to propose a harsh series of program cuts and tax increases to cope with a projected budget deficit.


In the State Legislature, some lawmakers are leery about the state cutting deals that will benefit wealthy sports team owners at a time when Mr. Codey has proposed eliminating popular property tax rebates.


Even at the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, some board members said they believed that the current proposal benefits the Giants at the expense of taxpayers. The Giants would cover the cost of demolishing the existing Giants Stadium and building the new one, and the new stadium would relieve the state of the expense of renovating the existing stadium. But the state would agree to spend $30 million to extend sewer lines and make other infrastructure improvements.


And state records show that the $6.3 million rent the Giants would pay for the land beneath the new facility is $10 million less than New Jersey now receives annually from the operation of Giants Stadium.


Copyright 2005*The New York Times Company

JCMAN320
March 16th, 2005, 03:55 PM
Jets officials make play for Giants Stadium
Surprising offer to N.J. heightens football's 2-team, 2-state drama

Wednesday, March 16, 2005
BY MATTHEW FUTTERMAN
Star-Ledger Staff

The Jets have offered to buy Giants Stadium, acting Gov. Richard Codey said late yesterday, adding another bizarre twist to the high- stakes negotiations over the future of professional football in New Jersey.

On a day when New York officials boasted they were on the verge of snaring a Super Bowl game for the Jets' proposed West Side stadium, New Jersey's governor said the team has offered at least $120 million for the state- owned facility in the Meadowlands.

State officials consider a deal to sell the 28-year-old stadium to the Jets the longest of long shots. But if talks proceed, it sets up the possibility of the Giants becoming tenants in the stadium that bears their name.

Jets President Jay Cross made the verbal offer Friday to George Zoffinger, chief executive of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, the state agency that controls the Meadowlands Sports Complex, Codey said.

"I'm aware of the dialogue that has occurred between Jay Cross and George Zoffinger," Codey said.

New Jersey officials were taking it as a sign that the Jets' West Side plan, opposed by the owner of Madison Square Garden, is in peril -- which a Jets spokeswoman denied.

"Last week we were supposedly buying the Garden; this week we are supposedly buying the Meadowlands," said Marissa Shorenstein, the team spokeswoman. "Nothing has changed. The New York Jets have made it unequivocally clear that we have no intention of building a new home anywhere but on the far West Side."

Making a play for Giants Stadium, though, could give the Jets a fallback should opposition to building a domed stadium over Manhattan rail yards force their hand.

The Jets have played in Giants Stadium for 24 years, and while their financial deal is similar to the Giants', they have long been considered secondary tenants. This latest move could be a way of sending a message: If the two teams have to share a new stadium in the Meadowlands, the seats won't all be the blue and red colors of the Giants.

The Giants' current lease runs out in 2026, while the Jets' ends in 2009. Any negotiations over a Jets deal would have to work out the sticky issue of stadium improvements that the state promised the Giants. The price tag for that work could hit $300 million.

It isn't clear if, during the initial talks, the Jets discussed how they would tackle any of the improvements.

Giants officials could not be reached for comment last night.

The Jets and New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg have spent the past five weeks waging a desperate battle to save the proposal for a $1.7 billion stadium, which would serve as a site of the 2012 Summer Olympics if the city is awarded the Games. An announcement is due this summer, but support for more than $600 million in public subsidies has been waning.

Negotiations between the Giants and New Jersey over a new stadium on this side of the Hudson River broke down last week. After that, the Jets and city leaders began talking to the Giants about bringing the Giants back to New York, too.

The Super Bowl adds another wrinkle, because attracting the 2010 game had been a major part of the rationale for a new Giants Stadium.

New York officials said yesterday the message from the National Football League was clear: Build a domed stadium and the Super Bowl will come to Manhattan in 2010.

"Unless we build the Sports and Convention Center, New York won't get the Super Bowl and will lose out on hundreds of jobs, more than $200 million in economic activity and nearly $30 million in tax revenue," Bloomberg said, using the formal name of the West Side project.

NFL officials did not return phone calls seeking comment.

New Jersey officials cried foul, however, claiming the NFL had promised the big game to the Meadowlands. Zoffinger accused the NFL of trying to extort money from taxpayers.

"We've been operating under the assumption they would keep their word and work with us on a Super Bowl," he said. "For them to use it as a carrot for a stadium in New York that is one of the worst possible sites for a facility in this country is a little disingenuous."

John Raskin, spokesperson for the Hell's Kitchen/Hudson Yards Alliance, a coalition of West Side elected officials and community leaders, said the possibility of the 2010 Super Bowl in Manhattan does not change his group's opinion.

"Super Bowl or no Super Bowl, the proposed West Side stadium would be an outrageous misuse of more than $1 billion of taxpayer money," Raskin said.

New Jersey officials tried yesterday to get talks with the Giants on track. The Giants have offered to spend $700 million on a new stadium and pay the state $6.3 million a year to rent the land. But the talks broke down over Codey's refusal to prohibit the state from taxing specific stadium-related items, such as luxury box leases and ticket sales.

Carl Goldberg, chairman of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, met yesterday with Steven Tisch, son of the team's co- owner, Robert Tisch, who has been representing his family's interests.

Tisch and Goldberg did not return phone calls, but officials involved with the negotiations said it was unlikely any deal would be reached during the next two weeks because Giants chief executive John Mara is in Hawaii attending an NFL meeting.

Mara, whose father, Wellington, owns 50 percent of the team, has been the driving force behind the team's stadium negotiations for several years. The Giants aren't expected to make any substantive moves without his direct involvement.

"John Mara is in Hawaii for competition committee meetings this week and league meetings next week," team spokesman Pat Hanlon said earlier in the day. "The bottom line is, do I expect anything given the circumstances? The answer is no."

The Hawaii meeting is where the NFL is scheduled to decide Monday on the location of 2010 Super Bowl. Under NFL rules, Super Bowl sites require approval by 24 of the league's 32 owners, who include Mara and Jets owner Robert "Woody" Johnson. A vote to hold the event in New York would be contingent on construction of the West Side stadium

JCMAN320
April 14th, 2005, 02:37 AM
Giants and state closer to a deal on stadium
Codey leads while Zoffinger accedes

Wednesday, April 13, 2005
BY MATTHEW FUTTERMAN
Star-Ledger Staff

State officials yesterday closed in on a deal with the Giants for a $750 million stadium in the Meadowlands Sports Complex.

While no face-to-face meetings took place, negotiators on both sides spent the day exchanging proposals via telephone and fax machine. By nightfall, officials involved in the discussions said only a few minor details remained.

"I would say that is a very appropriate description," said acting Gov. Richard Codey, who was directly involved in yesterday's talks.

At the same time, a main opponent of the deal, New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority Chief Executive George Zoffinger, said he now supports a new stadium.

The progress marks a major turning point in negotiations that have been stalled for more than a month. It comes after the Giants launched a withering attack on the state in the past week. Part of that effort included suing the Sports Authority for not renovating the current stadium in accordance with their lease and demanding as much as $300 million in renovations.

Talks broke down March 9 after the state refused to rule out taxes on stadium-related items, such as luxury suites. The Giants, meanwhile, refused to approve the $1.3 billion Xanadu retail and entertainment center now under construction at the sports complex.

Codey said the Giants are close to relenting on the tax issue. The two sides have nearly worked out a formula for dividing additional money from a naming rights deal if the Jets end up playing in the new stadium. Industry experts said those rights could sell for as much as $10 million a year if the Giants are alone. Add the Jets and the number could reach $15 million, they said.

Under the proposed formula, the state will get a cut of any naming rights deal beyond a certain threshold, Codey said. The Giants declined to comment on the specifics of the talks.

The naming rights issue could be moot. The Jets want to move to a proposed $2 billion stadium on Manhattan's West Side after their lease at the Meadowlands expires in 2009. They took a major step toward that goal yesterday, winning approval for the project from the Empire State Development Corp., New York state's economic development agency.

Just one more state board must approve the West Side stadium, though Madison Square Garden has sued to stop the project. That case could take years, making it likely that the Jets will remain in New Jersey beyond the end of their lease.

Codey achieved one major victory yesterday by finally winning the support of Zoffinger, who had argued it could cost taxpayers as much as $150 million and jeopardize Xanadu. He called Codey's chief counsel, Paul Fader, yesterday morning to tell him he was giving up his fight under pressure from the administration.

"At the governor's urging, I have agreed to go along with a transaction and bring any deal the governor reaches to the board of the sports authority for a vote," Zoffinger said. "My intention right now is to concentrate on completion of Xanadu, bringing rail service to the sports complex and building concert and racing business."

Under previously agreed-upon terms, the Giants will pay to build the $750 million stadium and give the state $6.3 million in annual rent and taxes for 75 acres at the Meadowlands Sports Complex. The state will pay up to $30 million to bring utilities to the site, and be responsible for $124 million in debt that remains on the existing stadium.

Codey has argued that renovating the current stadium would be far more expensive, though he has not yet said how he plans to pay off the debt.

Giants Chief Executive John Mara said that winning Zoffinger's support was a major victory.

"If it's true, it's welcome," said Mara. "Unity from the state certainly can't hurt."

Any agreement between the Giants and the state will be contingent on the team reaching a deal with Xanadu's developers, the Mills Corp. and Mack-Cali Realty, which want their complex open on football Sundays. The Giants fear that Xanadu will worsen what is already a traffic nightmare.

NYatKNIGHT
April 14th, 2005, 10:32 AM
Deal Is Struck for a New Giants Stadium at the Meadowlands

By LAURA MANSNERUS (http://query.nytimes.com/search/query?ppds=bylL&v1=LAURA MANSNERUS&fdq=19960101&td=sysdate&sort=newest&ac=LAURA MANSNERUS&inline=nyt-per)

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/misc/spacer.gif
Published: April 14, 2005



http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/dropcap/t.gifhe New York Giants say they are staying put in the Meadowlands.

Team executives and state officials said last night that they had reached an agreement for the construction of a new 80,000-seat stadium next to their existing one at the Meadowlands Sports Complex.

The deal, which was completed at a closed meeting yesterday between representatives of the team and the state, ends a months-long dispute between the two sides and calls for the Giants to build a $750 million stadium and pay the state $6.3 million a year.

The team and Acting Gov. Richard J. Codey issued statements last night saying that Mr. Codey and the Sports Authority chairman, Carl Goldberg, would join Giants executives John Mara and Steve Tisch at the stadium to announce details of the plan.

Mr. Codey had expressed optimism earlier yesterday that he would be able to announce a deal today. He did not attend the meeting but said he spent the hours between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. yesterday on the phone and at the fax machine with team officials in the effort to reach a deal.

Talks between the team and the state broke off last month when state officials refused to include a provision in the agreement that no taxes on stadium revenue would be imposed in the future and demanded that the Giants approve the construction of an entertainment and retail complex at the Meadowlands.

As the three other teams in the Meadowlands Sports Complex prepare to decamp for Newark and New York, the Giants have been at odds with the state over the terms of its lease, which runs until 2026, and the future of its 29-year-old stadium, which the team had argued was outdated and in need of hundreds of millions of dollars in renovations.

The dispute was aggravated by the decision of the Sports and Exposition Authority several years ago to stake the future of the sports complex on the privately financed development called Xanadu, now under construction, which will rise around the Continental Airlines Arena. The arena and the football stadium are separated by a road, but the Giants worried that the increased traffic and parking would be a crushing burden on game days.

In the meantime, the New Jersey Devils hockey team announced a move to Newark, where construction on a new stadium is to begin this summer, and the New Jersey Nets agreed to move to a new arena in Brooklyn. The New York Jets, who now share Giants Stadium, would be the prime tenants in the stadium that Mayor Michael Bloomberg is pushing for the West Side of Manhattan.

When Mr. Codey took office in mid-November, he sought to shift the emphasis at the Meadowlands complex back to its sports team tenants and to accommodate the Giants, the state's first professional sports franchise. He clashed with the Sports Authority president, George Zoffinger, who had opposed the Giants' stadium proposal.

This week, Mr. Zoffinger relented, clearing the way for renewed talks. Mr. Goldberg has taken the lead in the negotiations and emerged as a kind of referee. "I do not think George has mishandled anything," Mr. Goldberg said yesterday, commenting on reports that the governor had blamed Mr. Zoffinger for alienating the Giants.

Mr. Zoffinger had argued that the state would be sacrificing revenue from the stadium, including money from concerts. But the Giants say, and Mr. Goldberg agreed that the stadium does not bring in a profit.

Mr. Zoffinger said yesterday that he had nothing to do with the deal, adding: "You fight for what you think is right. But at the end of the day, I don't think it helps if I say much more about it."

Mr. Codey contended that the Giants' proposal to build their own stadium would save taxpayers money by relieving the state of its obligation under the lease to make improvements to maintain a "state of the art" stadium, as required by the lease.

After the talks broke down, the state sought a declaratory judgment from Superior Court in Bergen County to clarify the term "state of the art." On April 5, the Giants countersued to force the state to make improvements and to block the Xanadu construction.

Although the Giants are paying all construction costs, the state must still pay $120 million of outstanding debt on the old stadium and $30 million to $40 million in infrastructure improvements - a politically touchy proposition at a time when Mr. Codey is proposing to eliminate property tax rebates and cut social programs because of the state's dire fiscal condition.

The Sports Authority board, which is scheduled to meet April 27, must approve the agreement.



Josh Benson and John Holl contributed reporting for this article.

Copyright 2005 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html)The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)

TonyO
April 15th, 2005, 10:38 AM
NYTimes
April 15, 2005

New Jersey Reveals the Details of a New Stadium for the Giants

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2005/04/15/nyregion/giants.span.jpg
Acting Gov. Richard J. Codey, seated, on Thursday with, from left, the Giants' co-owners, Robert Tisch and Wellington Mara; Carl Goldberg, chairman of New Jersey's Sports and Exposition Authority; Steve Tisch; and John Mara, announcing plans for a new Giants Stadium.


By LAURA MANSNERUS

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J., April 14 - The New York Giants will replace their aging stadium with an expanded $750 million complex in the New Jersey Meadowlands under an agreement that Acting Gov. Richard J. Codey said Thursday was "the best deal for the taxpayers of any stadium deal in the N.F.L."

The new stadium will have 200 luxury suites - the current stadium now has 118 - a major expansion in club seating, new stores, restaurants and practice facilities, which altogether will nearly triple the size of the Giants' site at the Meadowlands Sports Complex, to 75 acres.

The Giants will own and manage the stadium, while paying the state $5 million a year in rent for the land and giving it $1.3 million annually in payments in lieu of taxes. The state will pay the $125 million in existing debt on the current stadium, and the infrastructure costs for the new stadium, estimated at $30 million.

The agreement, struck Wednesday night between team executives and state officials, ends a dispute that had landed both parties in court and cast doubt on the future of the sports complex, which even now is being transformed by the construction of a huge entertainment and retail development.

Mr. Codey described the deal, a critical victory in his campaign to rescue professional sports in the state, in glowing terms at a news conference with executives of the team.

The agreement still must be evaluated by the board of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, which has called a meeting on Tuesday to vote on it.

And the deal has detractors, including the sports authority's executive director, George Zoffinger. Mr. Zoffinger agreed just in the last week, under pressure from Mr. Codey, not to block the proposal. But he and some others at the sports authority have maintained that it effectively gave the team a taxpayer subsidy.

Mr. Codey and Carl Goldberg, the chairman of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, stressed that the Giants would pay all construction costs, while relieving the state of its obligation under the old lease to make improvements necessary to maintain a "state of the art" stadium - an uncertain but potentially huge obligation that the Giants put at $300 million and had threatened to enforce in court.

"When other states are building stadiums on the backs of taxpayers, Jersey has said no," Mr. Codey said.

But Andrew Zimbalist, an economist at Smith College who has written extensively on public spending on sports franchises, said Mr. Codey was "blatantly incorrect" in calling the stadium deal the best in the league for taxpayers.

Mr. Zimbalist noted that the New England Patriots and Washington Redskins play in stadiums built entirely with their owners' money, and he said that the Patriots are reimbursing the state for its $71 million in infrastructure costs.

Still, Mr. Zimbalist said the New Jersey deal was, among N.F.L. stadiums, "very close to the top end of taxpayer advantage, or lack of disadvantage," since the average public subsidy for an N.F.L. stadium is 60 percent.

A better deal for the state, Mr. Zimbalist said, would be losing the team altogether. But Mr. Codey made it clear from the day he took office in November that that was not an option. And after negotiations collapsed last month, Mr. Codey worked to revive them.

In the meantime, the Giants used the "state of the art" provision in their lease as a potential trump, suing the sports authority to force it to pay for renovations.

John Mara, the Giants' executive vice president, whose family owns 50 percent of the team, said that "there was a period of time when I was not sure we were going to make it" but that "that really changed over the past few days when the governor took charge of negotiations."

While the Giants are no longer pursuing the renovation issue in court, Mr. Mara said, the team is not dropping its request for an injunction to stop the construction of the Meadowlands Xanadu project at the sports complex.

The project, part of former Gov. James E. McGreevey's plan to ease the state out of the professional sports business, has angered the team, which claims that Xanadu patrons will interfere with game traffic and parking.

The Giants and the Xanadu developers, the Mills Corporation and the Mack-Cali Realty Corporation, must still reach a separate accord on those traffic and parking issues. While it is not clear what recourse the team would have if its concerns are not satisfied, Mr. Mara said the team was "cautiously optimistic," and Robert G. Sommer, a spokesman for the Xanadu partnership, said, "we believe, and I'm sure it's their belief, that we'll work it out."

The team's new agreement with New Jersey leaves open the possibility that the New York Jets, who now share the stadium with the Giants but are planning a move to the proposed West Side stadium in Manhattan, will stay.

The other teams at the sports complex are planning to leave, the New Jersey Devils hockey team for a new arena in Newark, the New Jersey Nets for a new arena in Brooklyn and the MetroStars soccer team to a planned stadium in Harrison, N.J.

The Giants do not yet have a site plan or design for their expanded new quarters, scheduled for completion in 2008. The stadium will seat 80,000, an increase of 4,000 seats, and in addition to the luxury suites will include club seating for 8,000 to 10,000 people. The current stadium has 142 club seats. The plan also calls for wider concourses and improved concession stands and bathrooms.

The team's lease is for 40 years with options that could extend it to 98 years. Mr. Zimbalist said that while the stadium would not be the most expensive ever built, "it will be in the top five."

Mr. Mara said, "We are currently well down in the third quartile of the N.F.L. in terms of our revenues, and we believe a new stadium will bring us into the first quartile." He said he had no projections on ticket costs but expected that luxury suites would cost about $200,000 a year each.

In addition, the state has agreed to sell naming rights to the stadium, and to give the first $12 million to the team. The state would keep up to $3 million of any excess.

While Mr. Codey and Mr. Goldberg congratulated the team owners - including the Maras and the Tisch family, the Giants' co-owners - at the news conference, Mr. Zoffinger was conspicuously absent. When asked whether Mr. Zoffinger's job was safe, Mr. Codey shrugged. But Mr. Goldberg said, "I'm sure he will be the head of the sports authority for as long as he wishes." Mr. Zoffinger was out of state Thursday and not available for comment.


Richard Sandomir contributed reporting for this article.

JCMAN320
June 10th, 2005, 04:00 AM
N.J. offers to add a stadium roof to keep Jets in state
State ups ante for stranded football team

Wednesday, June 08, 2005
BY MATTHEW FUTTERMAN
Star-Ledger Staff

When Jets owner Woody Johnson gets New Jersey's pitch to make the Meadowlands the permanent home for his football team, state officials said yesterday, he will hear these two important words: "retractable roof."

George Zoffinger, chief executive of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, said yesterday that, with the demise of plans for a Manhattan home for the Jets, New Jersey will try to nail down a deal for a stadium that not only would serve the Jets and the Giants but could host such events as the Super Bowl and NCAA basketball's Final Four.

"If both teams decide to stay, there is a tremendous opportunity for the state to build a dome on the new stadium, and make its money back on the investment," Zoffinger said. "This can work."

The pronouncement came the day after one of the most tumultuous days in the recent political history in New York. The Jets' five-year quest for a stadium on Manhattan's West Side and the city's campaign to land the 2012 Summer Olympic Games both came crashing down in a classic, New York-style political brawl. Despite backing from New York's Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Gov. George Pataki, the stadium efforts failed in the face of opposition from the state's top two legislators, leaving the Jets with few alternatives once their Giants Stadium lease expires in 2008.

However, Giants officials have said they would welcome the Jets as a partner in the $750 million stadium the team plans to build near the site of their current one. And both teams' owners and acting Gov. Richard Codey plan to make an intense push in the coming weeks to keep the Jets in New Jersey.

"The time for us to act is now, to bring two franchises together; it's an influx of cash and we could build the premier stadium in the entire country," said state Sen. Paul Sarlo (D-Bergen), whose district includes the Meadowlands.

Sarlo said he is opposed to taxpayers paying for the retractable roof, which could cost as much as $200 million, or almost twice the cost of a fixed dome.

Codey said he wasn't ready to commit public money to it but that the idea of a retractable roof is definitely on the table.

"The Giants were not originally enamored of the idea of a roof, but now that the Jets may be involved and the cost would be significantly less, they may be more inclined," Codey said.

John Mara, the Giants chief executive, said his organization wants to play outdoors.

"We would consider a retractable roof, but it doesn't pay for us to incur the additional cost," Mara said. "If the state is willing to pay for it, though, it's something we're willing to talk about."

Jets officials didn't return phone calls seeking comment. Team officials were said to be seething about the collapse of their dream for a stadium in Manhattan, which ended Monday while many of the team's top executives were taking part in a golf outing organized by head coach Herman Edwards.

Industry experts said a stadium with a retractable roof in the Meadowlands would be a gold mine for the two teams: They would cut their expenses and still bring in nearly as much money in ticket and luxury suite sales and advertising.

The teams could jointly sell the luxury suites and high-priced club seats, and the stadium could be built with electronic billboards so the teams could each sell individual sponsorships to rival companies. McDonald's, for example, would be able to sponsor the Giants and buy a sign that, when the Jets played, could turn into a Burger King sign.

"Economically, this is what makes sense," said Robert Tillis, a leading financial consultant to the sports industry. "The only problem is everyone these days wants to own and manage their own building, and the question is: Can these two organizations live with each other? The challenges are more psychological than financial."

The teams' owners -- Johnson and the Giants' Mara and Tisch families -- have a cordial relationship, but the two sides aren't as close as when Leon Hess owned the Jets.

Johnson has rejected the idea of bringing his team back to Queens, and he has lost his Manhattan bid, but he has little appetite for continuing to play in a building that bears another team's name and where the seats are Giants blue and red.

John Mara said he expects a corporation to buy the naming rights to the new Meadowlands stadium and that other issues also could be resolved if Johnson is willing to work with a "crosstown rival."

Experts said Johnson will have to determine the price of a complicated trade-off.

"A team gives up a considerable amount of its identity when it shares a stadium," said David Carter, who teaches at the University of Southern California about the business of sports. "But that can be offset by the major influx of corporate dollars that kind of building is going to attract."

JCMAN320
June 14th, 2005, 05:18 AM
Meadowlands gaining ground as the Jets' future

Tuesday, June 14, 2005
BY MATTHEW FUTTERMAN
Star-Ledger Staff

With New York City reaching a deal with the Mets for a new ballpark in Queens that will morph into an Olympic Stadium if the city lands the 2012 Olympics, the Jets now appear even more likely to call the Meadowlands home for decades to come.

Jets owner Woody Johnson never wanted to move his team back to Queens and had his heart set on the West Side of Manhattan. But losing NYC2012, the Olympic organizers, as a partner makes it that much harder to build a controversial West Side stadium, which struggled to gain overwhelming support even when it was coupled with the allure of those five multicolored rings.

Yesterday, Jets officials maintained their public stance that all hope is not lost for the West Side.

"We have always maintained that this project, for us at least, was not about hosting the Olympics, but creating the best sports and convention center in the world, and that hasn't changed," said Matt Higgins, a team spokesman.

However, the Jets' top executives have already begun talks with the Giants about a shared stadium. Also, officials in New Jersey say New York's decision to partner with the Mets on an Olympic stadium in Queens shows that the Jets were sincere when they said repeatedly the Meadowlands remained their top alternative if plans in Manhattan fell through.

"The Jets are now conspicuously absent from the Olympic plan, and I think that speaks volumes about their interest in negotiating an understanding with New Jersey and the Giants," said Carl Goldberg, chairman of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, which operates the Meadowlands.

Acting Gov. Richard Codey said yesterday that the Jets were "absolutely, positively" going to remain in New Jersey. "No question about it. They're dealing with the Giants."

If the Jets end up with their "Plan B," the team will have plenty of company. With most taxpayers against public subsidies for sports franchises, nearly every top sports team in the region has been forced during the past decade to abandon its dream home and settle for one they can afford and the public can stomach.

The same can be said for New York's Olympic bid.

The NYC2012 bid committee worked yesterday to finalize its proposal for the 2012 Games with a stadium in Queens -- not the West Side of Manhattan -- as the centerpiece.

We have no question that this plan technically will be outstanding, will demonstrate the Games will be an outstanding Games," Jay Kriegel, the NYC2012 bid committee executive director, said in a telephone interview with the Associated Press.

The New York committee hopes to send its new plan to the International Olympic Committee next week. The IOC will choose a host city for the 2012 Games on July 6.

When the plans for the West Side stadium did not receive the state funding needed to build it, NYC2012 was left to scramble to find a new site for its bid.

The IOC's bid evaluation committee gave the city until today to respond to a report where the lack of a stadium was noted as a concern. New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Mets owner Fred Wilpon announced the plans for the stadium in Queens on Sunday.

"Faced with adversity, New York has gotten back up off the mat very quickly and has demonstrated the capacity to put something big, bold and incredibly complicated together in just a few days," Kriegel said.

BUILDING BLOCKS

The Jets -- and NYC2012 -- are the latest to revert to Plan B with their stadium plans. Here is a rundown of those teams, their dreams and the current state of their plans:

Yankees

Plan A: In 1995 George Steinbrenner, with former Mayor Rudolph Giuliani's support, pursues a stadium at the Hudson rail yards on Manhattan's West Side, but the community rejects the idea of 50,000 fans descending on their neighborhood 81 days each year and hundreds of millions in public subsidies spent on the project.

Plan B: The Yankees claim they are weeks away from announcing a deal with New York City to build a $700 million stadium in a South Bronx park near their current home. The team will pay for the stadium, with the city and state fixing nearby roads and building a train station.

Mets

Plan A: In 1998 owner Fred Wilpon proposes an $800 million replica of Ebbets Field with a retractable roof in Queens, but he fails to draw some $400 million in financial support from city officials.

Plan B: On Sunday Wilpon agrees to a build a $600 million stadium on his own that will be converted to an Olympic stadium if the city lands the 2012 Summer Olympics. There will be no roof.

Jets

Plan A: In 2000 the Jets partner with NYC2012, the group behind New York's Olympic bid, and propose what becomes a $2.2 billion Olympic and football stadium for Manhattan's West Side. It requires a $1 billion public subsidy.

Plan B: After the West Side plan collapsed last week, the Jets and Giants start discussing a shared stadium in the Meadowlands.

Giants

Plan A: In 2001 the Giants reached an agreement with former acting Gov. Donald DiFrancesco to take over Giants Stadium for $1, but incoming Gov. James E. McGreevey kills the deal.

Plan B: The Giants, and likely the Jets, will spend $800 million to build a stadium in the Meadowlands.

Nets

Plan A: In 1998 Nets owners Raymond Chambers and Lewis Katz propose an arena in Newark, which fails three times in the state legislature.

Plan B: In 2004, Chambers, Katz and their partners double their purchase price of $150 million by selling the team to Bruce Ratner for $300 million. Ratner is planning an arena in Brooklyn.

Devils

Plan A: In 1998, former owner John McMullen proposes an arena on the Hoboken waterfront above the rail terminal, but he fails to gain public support.

Plan B: Owner Jeff Vanderbeek is building an arena in Newark, where the city has pledged $210 million for the project.

Knicks/Rangers

Plan A: From 1998-2004, the teams' parent company, Cablevision Systems, scout out sites in midtown Manhattan for a new Madison Square Garden but come up empty-handed.

Plan B: Last year the team announces a $300 million renovation of their current home.

JCMAN320
June 15th, 2005, 03:57 PM
Giants Stadium rail link seen by 2007

Wednesday, June 15, 2005
By JOE MALINCONICO
NEWHOUSE NEWS SERVICE

Giants Stadium could finally get a train station, but not for another two and a half years.

NJ Transit expects to begin construction this fall on a $150 million, 2.3-mile rail spur that would link the sports complex to just about every train station in the state by December 2007.

But the project already faces second-guessing from transportation and environmental groups who question whether the plan is the best way to provide train service to the Meadowlands and the proposed Xanadu retail and entertainment center.

Passengers on the Northeast Corridor, North Jersey Coast Line, Midtown Direct and Bergen-Main lines would be able to take trains to Secaucus Junction and make the transfer for the five-mile, eight-minute ride to the Meadowlands from there. On the Raritan Valley line, folks would have to make two transfers - one at Newark and a second at Secaucus.

Diesel shuttle trains would make a 23-minute run between Hoboken Terminal and the sports complex, including the stop at Secaucus to pick up passengers transferring from other lines.

Even including time for transfers at Secaucus, the new link would put more than 80 stations around the state within a one-hour trip of the Meadowlands, transit officials said.

On football Sundays or during event events like basketball games or concerts, the shuttle trains to the Meadowlands would run every five or 10 minutes, under NJ Transit's plans. Otherwise, the trains would operate at half-hour intervals, seven days a week, from 9 a.m. to midnight.

Transit officials estimate that between 10,000 and 12,000 people would take trains to events at Giants Stadium. They have not come up with numbers for other times, saying that will depend on exactly what gets built at Xanadu.

The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey is putting up all the money for the project, while NJ Transit is handling the construction and operation of the trains.

In addition to the $150 million spur, which would connect to the Meadowlands from NJ Transit's Pascack Valley line, officials also are considering building a $1 billion extension of the light rail line in Hudson County to the sports complex. Meanwhile, the state Department of Transportation is moving ahead on $71 million worth of road work at the complex, including new connections with the New Jersey Turnpike and improvement to routes 3, 17 and 120.

"You're going to have many, many more options there," Transportation Commissioner Jack Lettiere said. "But.all of the dots haven't been connected yet. We're working with NJ Transit, the Turnpike, the county, the Meadowlands and all the other agencies involved to do that. This all has to fit together and it can."

ZippyTheChimp
August 11th, 2005, 08:48 AM
http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/


The Jets go long by asking Giants to share stadium

'NFL showplace' to seat 90,000

Thursday, August 11, 2005 BY MATTHEW FUTTERMAN
Star-Ledger Staff

In the strongest signal yet that they are serious about making New Jersey their permanent home, the Jets are proposing the "ultimate NFL showplace" in the Meadowlands, including a 90,000-seat stadium that they would share with the Giants.

The proposal, which the Jets submitted yesterday to the Giants, calls for a massive football complex in East Rutherford that would be integrated with the Xanadu retail and entertainment center now under construction.

Plans call for the two teams to privately finance the stadium, a price for which was not included. In addition, a hotel and conference center, a tailgating park and an interactive center that would combine the two teams' Halls of Fame with the NFL Experience would be built.

The project should "create the ultimate NFL showplace in the nation's largest market through an unprecedented partnership between two teams in the same league...," according to the plan, a copy of which was obtained by The Star-Ledger.

By submitting such a plan, the Jets are indicating they are serious about staying in New Jersey. Their proposal also launches a new chapter in the Giants' agreement with acting Gov. Richard Codey to build an $800 million, 80,000-seat stadium in the Meadowlands.

Giants Stadium opened in 1976 and the two teams have played there since 1984.

Since that agreement between the Giants and the state was reached last spring, the Jets' plans to move to a new stadium on Manhattan's West Side have collapsed. In addition, the Giants have said they would like to form a partnership with the Jets for a shared stadium in the Meadowlands to reduce their risk in the privately financed venture.

Despite sputtering talks over the past two months, officials said yesterday the two sides now appear to be moving toward a partnership.

"We have said all along a shared stadium ... makes the most sense, and this shows that the Jets are serious about working with the Giants and working with Xanadu to make this happen," said George Zoffinger, chief executive of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, which operates the Meadowlands Sports Complex.

John Mara, chief executive for the Giants, could not be reached for comment yesterday and Jets officials declined to comment directly on the plan.

In a related development, the Jets received an invitation this week from New York City officials to discuss a move to Queens, where a new stadium would be built for them. In a statement, Matt Higgins, a team spokesman, said the Jets have accepted the invitation to meet later this month and are leaving all their options open.

At the same time, however, Higgins indicated a new intensity in the talks with the Giants.

"Negotiations with the state of New Jersey and the Giants over a proposed joint stadium have intensified," Higgins' statement said. "If negotiations proceed accordingly, all parties expect an agreement could be reached by Fall 2005."

Under the Jets' proposal, the team would become a part of the Giants' deal with the state. That deal calls for the Giants to pay for construction of a new stadium and for the state to supply 75 acres of land and $30 million in infrastructure improvements.

The Jets' plan calls for the two teams to operate the stadium without involvement from the sports authority and to keep all revenues from the building. The proposed 90,000-seat stadium, which would be the largest in the National Football League, would be built between the current facility and the Meadowlands Racetrack, as the Giants have proposed.

However, that's where similarities with the Giants' plan end.

The stadium the Jets are proposing is 10,000 seats larger. Instead of putting the Giants training facility next to the new stadium on property that would be more desirable for commercial activity, the Jets propose constructing it on the northern side of the racetrack on Paterson Plank Road.

The Jets also want to divide the parking and fan gathering areas into an "urban zone" centered around a new rail station that would be built near the stadium, and a "suburban zone" where much of the outdoor parking and tailgating would occur.

The urban zone would include retail stores, restaurants and bars; the suburban zone would include food and beverage stands, according to the proposal.

While a shared stadium now appears to be the goal of both teams, the two sides have a long way to go before they can begin construction. They need to form a joint corporation to manage the facility and agree on the design of the stadium itself.

The Giants also remain skeptical of the Xanadu project, fearing that the massive retail and entertainment center will worsen traffic problems on game days. For their part, the Jets favor the new energy Xanadu is expected to bring to the sports complex.

Zoffinger has said the state would like to put a retractable roof on a new stadium so it could accommodate a Super Bowl and perhaps the NCAA Final Four college basketball tournament. While the state might be willing to pay for a roof, it would likely want to share in the profits or have the right to schedule other events, such as concerts and international soccer games, in the building.

The football teams, however, remain intent on managing the building privately and would likely want to live without the roof instead of allowing the state to take a share of the profits.

Under the proposal, the Jets also would move their training facilities and headquarters from Hofstra University on Long Island to New Jersey to a site the state would provide. That would allow the state to collect significantly more income taxes from the organization's $100 million payroll.

Both plans call for the Giants to relocate their training facilities from Albany, N.Y., to the Meadowlands.

© 2005 The Star Ledger© 2005 NJ.com All Rights Reserved. if

ZippyTheChimp
August 11th, 2005, 07:38 PM
Jets submit plan for shared stadium with Giants

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

August 11, 2005, 4:47 PM EDT

NEWARK, N.J. -- With the dream of a Manhattan stadium fading, the Jets are putting most of their efforts into a proposal that would keep them at the Meadowlands sports complex, again sharing a stadium with the New York Giants, a Jets executive said Thursday.

"Negotiations with the Giants are ongoing, and that's not the case elsewhere," Jets vice president Matthew Higgins said.

The most recent move came Wednesday, when the Jets submitted a plan for a new, 90,000-seat stadium that would be integrated with the Xanadu shopping and entertainment center being built at the Meadowlands, he said. It would hold more people than any other in the NFL.

The plan first was reported by The Star-Ledger of Newark in Thursday's newspapers.

Meanwhile, the Jets plan to meet later this month with officials from Queens, N.Y, who would like the Jets to build near their original home at Shea Stadium. "We're happy to listen," Higgins said.

The Giants have already agreed with New Jersey, which operates the Meadowlands, to build an 80,000-seat stadium that would open for the 2009 season. The Giants plan on paying for the $750 million venue themselves, but reiterated Thursday they would be happy to share ownership with the Jets.

"It remains our preference to have them stay in the Meadowlands as our partners in a new stadium," John K. Mara, the team's chief operating officer, said in an e-mail exchange.

"If they choose to go in a different direction, then we would wish them the best of luck. In the meantime, we are proceeding with our plans to build a new stadium," Mara said.

He declined to comment on the plan submitted by the Jets, and Higgins had no immediate detail on how Xanadu would fit with the stadium.

The Giants have tried, without success, to halt Xanadu construction, maintaining that their lease for the stadium requires no other activity at the Meadowlands begin until three hours after football games end. The team, asserting Xanadu would cause traffic jams for its fans, has been unable to reach an agreement with Xanadu's developers on when the complex would operate on game days.

The Jets plan includes a rail line for the complex, said George R. Zoffinger, president and CEO of the New Jersey Sports & Exposition Authority, which operates the Meadowlands.

"Paramount in our mind is the progress that has been made between the two teams," Zoffinger said in a statement.

"I would hope that both teams would strongly consider a retractable dome for the stadium," he said. "It would allow the stadium to host the Super Bowl, Final Four, even the Olympics, as well as other events."

The Jets had hoped to build a new stadium in Manhattan, but suffered a major setback in June when New York state leaders refused to approve $300 million for the $2.2 billion structure, which was also envisioned as the stadium for the 2012 Olympics. The games were later awarded to London.

Higgins said the Jets have until Aug. 31 to tell the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which awarded rights to the Manhattan site to the Jets, whether the team is still interested in the site.

Copyright © 2005, Newsday, Inc. (http://www.nynewsday.com/)

JCMAN320
August 18th, 2005, 03:19 AM
State calls for Giants, Jets to huddle on stadium

Wednesday, August 17, 2005
BY MATTHEW FUTTERMAN
Star-Ledger Staff

The Giants' latest plan for a new stadium complex in the Meadowlands contrasts starkly with the Jets' proposal for the site.

Just a week ago, state officials were heralding the Jets' plans for a joint stadium and retail complex at the Meadowlands as a major step toward building the NFL's premier destination. But the two sides remain far apart on their proposals both for a stadium and how to develop commercial property around it.

In fact, according to drawings the Giants submitted this week to the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, the team doesn't yet acknowledge the project may become a joint venture, nor does the Giants' latest plan incorporate any of the Jets' design suggestions. The new drawings label the proposed stadium "Giants Stadium" and the surrounding plaza "Giants Plaza."

"Clearly, the plan the Giants gave is dramatically different than the one given to the authority by Jets," said Carl Goldberg, chairman of the sports authority, the state agency that operates the Meadowlands Sports Complex. "They have different visions."

Goldberg said yesterday the sports authority would return the Giants' plans because they lacked details about parking, traffic management and engineering, which the authority needs to continue its evaluation.

But by sending back the plans, state officials said, the sports authority also was telling the Giants to work more closely with the Jets before making another submission.

"When you start a partnership, there will be disagreements," acting Gov. Richard Codey said. "But these two teams need to work harder, meet more often and spend more time in those meetings to get this done."

According to both teams' plans, the new stadium would go in between the current stadium and the Meadowlands Racetrack, but they disagree on key elements:


Location of the Giants' practice facility: The Jets proposed moving the Giants training center and practice fields behind the Meadowlands Racetrack so as not to take up valuable land adjacent to the stadium with a use that would not generate revenue. The Giants prefer to keep the practice fields next to the stadium so there is a seamless flow between training facility and playing field.


Design of the commercial development around the stadium: The Jets want to concentrate the development in two structures -- a hotel and conference center and another building that would house everything from the interactive NFL Experience to football-themed restaurants and shops and the teams' halls of fame. The Giants want to spread the retail facilities around the stadium in a series of buildings of various sizes.


Connections to the adjacent Xanadu retail and entertainment complex: The Jets would integrate the stadium's commercial and retail space with Xanadu, connecting the two projects using a complex built above the planned rail station at the Meadowlands. The Giants propose a simple 400-foot walkway across Route 120.


The size of the stadium: The Jets propose a 90,000-seat stadium, while the Giants remain committed to an 80,000-seat structure.


Giants Chief Executive John Mara declined to comment specifically on his team's plans.

"I'm not going to confirm what we have and have not submitted," he said, "other than to say we've been working closely with the sports authority for some time, submitting various plans to them on a regular basis, and we will continue to do so."

Jets Chief Executive Jay Cross is on vacation this week and has not seen the Giants' latest proposal. Matt Higgins, a Jets spokesman, declined to comment on the Giants' plans.

The two teams have shared Giants Stadium since 1984. Until last week, the Jets were officially committed to moving to New York. But plans to move to the West Side of Manhattan collapsed in June and the team has said it would prefer to stay in New Jersey in a shared stadium, rather than build its own home at an alternative New York site in Queens.

The Giants remain a step ahead of the Jets because the team has already signed a memorandum of understanding, or MOU, with the state to build an $800 million stadium in the Meadowlands.

However, that agreement carries certain obligations that are becoming increasingly burdensome to the team.

For example, unless the Giants receive the Jets' approval for a new stadium and reach an agreement with the developers of Xanadu on a traffic plan by Sept. 15, the state has the right to tear up the MOU.

Also, since the Giants have signed an MOU and have begun a formal approval process, the sports authority expects the team's plans to be more detailed than the conceptual proposal the Jets submitted last week.

"I was looking for a much higher level and complete submission from the Giants," Goldberg said. "The Jets wanted to demonstrate their commitment to the state in a conceptual plan. The Giants were moving forward in a process that would lead to a master plan approval, and a lot higher level of detail was anticipated."

JCMAN320
August 18th, 2005, 03:21 AM
State calls for Giants, Jets to huddle on stadium

Wednesday, August 17, 2005
BY MATTHEW FUTTERMAN
Star-Ledger Staff

The Giants' latest plan for a new stadium complex in the Meadowlands contrasts starkly with the Jets' proposal for the site.

Just a week ago, state officials were heralding the Jets' plans for a joint stadium and retail complex at the Meadowlands as a major step toward building the NFL's premier destination. But the two sides remain far apart on their proposals both for a stadium and how to develop commercial property around it.

In fact, according to drawings the Giants submitted this week to the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, the team doesn't yet acknowledge the project may become a joint venture, nor does the Giants' latest plan incorporate any of the Jets' design suggestions. The new drawings label the proposed stadium "Giants Stadium" and the surrounding plaza "Giants Plaza."

"Clearly, the plan the Giants gave is dramatically different than the one given to the authority by Jets," said Carl Goldberg, chairman of the sports authority, the state agency that operates the Meadowlands Sports Complex. "They have different visions."

Goldberg said yesterday the sports authority would return the Giants' plans because they lacked details about parking, traffic management and engineering, which the authority needs to continue its evaluation.

But by sending back the plans, state officials said, the sports authority also was telling the Giants to work more closely with the Jets before making another submission.

"When you start a partnership, there will be disagreements," acting Gov. Richard Codey said. "But these two teams need to work harder, meet more often and spend more time in those meetings to get this done."

According to both teams' plans, the new stadium would go in between the current stadium and the Meadowlands Racetrack, but they disagree on key elements:


Location of the Giants' practice facility: The Jets proposed moving the Giants training center and practice fields behind the Meadowlands Racetrack so as not to take up valuable land adjacent to the stadium with a use that would not generate revenue. The Giants prefer to keep the practice fields next to the stadium so there is a seamless flow between training facility and playing field.


Design of the commercial development around the stadium: The Jets want to concentrate the development in two structures -- a hotel and conference center and another building that would house everything from the interactive NFL Experience to football-themed restaurants and shops and the teams' halls of fame. The Giants want to spread the retail facilities around the stadium in a series of buildings of various sizes.


Connections to the adjacent Xanadu retail and entertainment complex: The Jets would integrate the stadium's commercial and retail space with Xanadu, connecting the two projects using a complex built above the planned rail station at the Meadowlands. The Giants propose a simple 400-foot walkway across Route 120.


The size of the stadium: The Jets propose a 90,000-seat stadium, while the Giants remain committed to an 80,000-seat structure.


Giants Chief Executive John Mara declined to comment specifically on his team's plans.

"I'm not going to confirm what we have and have not submitted," he said, "other than to say we've been working closely with the sports authority for some time, submitting various plans to them on a regular basis, and we will continue to do so."

Jets Chief Executive Jay Cross is on vacation this week and has not seen the Giants' latest proposal. Matt Higgins, a Jets spokesman, declined to comment on the Giants' plans.

The two teams have shared Giants Stadium since 1984. Until last week, the Jets were officially committed to moving to New York. But plans to move to the West Side of Manhattan collapsed in June and the team has said it would prefer to stay in New Jersey in a shared stadium, rather than build its own home at an alternative New York site in Queens.

The Giants remain a step ahead of the Jets because the team has already signed a memorandum of understanding, or MOU, with the state to build an $800 million stadium in the Meadowlands.

However, that agreement carries certain obligations that are becoming increasingly burdensome to the team.

For example, unless the Giants receive the Jets' approval for a new stadium and reach an agreement with the developers of Xanadu on a traffic plan by Sept. 15, the state has the right to tear up the MOU.

Also, since the Giants have signed an MOU and have begun a formal approval process, the sports authority expects the team's plans to be more detailed than the conceptual proposal the Jets submitted last week.

"I was looking for a much higher level and complete submission from the Giants," Goldberg said. "The Jets wanted to demonstrate their commitment to the state in a conceptual plan. The Giants were moving forward in a process that would lead to a master plan approval, and a lot higher level of detail was anticipated."

ZippyTheChimp
August 26th, 2005, 03:37 PM
Giants face 3 obstacles to getting stadium done

Friday, August 26, 2005

By JOHN BRENNAN
STAFF WRITER

The New York Giants are supposed to work out agreements for their $800 million stadium plan by Sept. 15 with the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, with the New York Jets, and with the developers of the nearby Xanadu project.
Only three weeks shy of that deadline, the Giants are a resounding 0-for-3.

That sobering reality induced acting Governor Codey and Giants executives to meet at the National Football League team's offices Tuesday night. Although both sides said Wednesday the discussions were cordial, numerous obstacles remain as the clock ticks toward the end of Codey's tenure.

"It was a friendly meeting, but we still have disagreements on how to get this thing resolved," said Giants Vice President John Mara, who was joined at the meeting by colleague Steve Tisch. "I'm not sure where we go from here."

The Giants have run into difficulty on each of three fronts:

New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority officials have been critical of what they term insufficient progress being made by the Giants' stadium design team.

Though the Jets' dream of moving to Manhattan's West Side was extinguished two months ago, the team still has yet to commit to joining the Giants in a new Meadowlands facility. Jets executives were in Queens, their previous home, on Tuesday afternoon to listen to a new pitch from elected officials there.

Talks between the Giants and Xanadu developers Mills Corp. and Mack-Cali have broken down over whether Xanadu would be allowed to open on Giants game days. The club went to court Tuesday in an effort to get a judge to enforce such a ban.

No one wants to speculate on what will happen if the team doesn't meet the mid-September target date, part of a memorandum of understanding signed on April 14 during a triumphant news conference at 29-year-old Giants Stadium.

Either the Giants or the state could walk away from the deal next month if the three agreements are not in place. That could lead to a revival of a long-running dispute over how much renovation would be necessary on the current stadium to make it "state of the art," as required by the Giants' lease.

Codey is intent on making a stadium deal part of his legacy, and Giants officials seem reluctant to find out whether gubernatorial candidates Jon Corzine or Doug Forrester would be as eager to cooperate with the Giants on a new stadium.

"I want to have something done by [Sept. 15]," Codey said. "I want everybody to work things out and compromise. I'd say I'm still optimistic."

Codey was joined at Tuesday's meeting by New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority Chairman Carl Goldberg.

"I would say that the Giants understand, without any ambiguity, what the expectation of the governor is as far as the content of the documents we need to move into the master planning process," said Goldberg, a prominent real estate developer.

Goldberg and sports authority President George Zoffinger expressed disappointment early this month with the quality of the Giants' design work. The Jets, meanwhile, recently submitted a preliminary plan for 90,000-seat stadium that wowed state officials with its retail and entertainment concepts throughout the 75-acre site.

But Mara said the Giants' plans remain on schedule.

"Our developers and architects will have a submission next month that is fully compliant with what the state wants," Mara said.

That submission, however, is unlikely to include much input from the Jets as long as they continue flirting with Queens.

Does that mean if the Jets decide to stay in New Jersey, that the design work has to start all over again?

"I don't see why we would have to do that," Mara said. "We've been working on this for close to a year, and we've spent millions of dollars for a seating bowl and other concepts. We can't start over now."

Talks with Mills/Mack-Cali have floundered over the Giants' assertion that traffic on game days would be nightmarish if Xanadu patrons mingled with the 80,000 Giants fans.

"It's obvious that we are at an impasse with them," Mara said. "It's equally obvious that there are a lot of balls up in the air right now."

E-mail: brennan@northjersey.com




Copyright (http://www.northjersey.com/copyright.php) © 2005 North Jersey Media Group Inc. (http://www.njmg.com/)

Ninjahedge
August 29th, 2005, 09:07 AM
Traffic WOULD be hellish on those days, but asking a huge mall to shut down all day for a 3 hour game? They must be joking.

This looks like an initial request that they will scale back to some agreement on parking/traffic control.


It is not like traffic is great along route 3 any busy day, let alone after a game lets out... :p

STT757
August 29th, 2005, 11:00 AM
Traffic WOULD be hellish on those days, but asking a huge mall to shut down all day for a 3 hour game? They must be joking.

This looks like an initial request that they will scale back to some agreement on parking/traffic control.


It is not like traffic is great along route 3 any busy day, let alone after a game lets out... :p

The Meadowlands is in Bergen County, Bergen County enforces Blue laws. All the malls in Bergen County are closed on Sundays. That would leave the place open for Football fan parking.

Ninjahedge
August 29th, 2005, 11:23 AM
The Meadowlands is in Bergen County, Bergen County enforces Blue laws. All the malls in Bergen County are closed on Sundays. That would leave the place open for Football fan parking.

I live in Bergen County.

What about Friday night games?

What about grocery or food stores?

Why would the Giants be asking for the mall to be completely shut down if there was going to be no concern about it in the first place? What if the Blue Laws were waived for this particular development?


(PS, I grew up in BC.. ;) You went to Wayne on Sunday if you wanted a mall....)

JD
August 29th, 2005, 09:13 PM
Here's the question I would like answered about Giants Stadium: what does it say when a THIRTY YEAR OLD arena is considered obsolete? Eight hundred million dollars--no small amount of which comes from the public trough--for a football stadium when the one used now is in perfectly fine shape?

Why is no one discussing this matter?

If the Giants/Jets get this pleasuredome, can they at least sign something that says they'll use this thing for at least fifty years? Or can the public look forward to this "we need a new stadium" argument in 2025?

TLOZ Link5
August 29th, 2005, 10:05 PM
They just don't make 'em like they used to, JD :)

Even in an era of renewed architectural sensitivity, are we still, like Ada Louise Huxtable once said, a tinhorn culture that wants and gets tincan architecture?

ZippyTheChimp
August 30th, 2005, 12:50 AM
I couldn't resist. They're all obsolete now., :p

New football arenas push bounds of stadium engineering

Monday, August 29, 2005

By Alex Frangos, The Wall Street Journal


At the Arizona Cardinals new stadium in Glendale, Ariz., a half-dozen of the team's 300-pound linemen will jump up and down in unison next month, hammering a 30-foot patch of turf under their cleats.

Training for a new quarterback blitz? Nope. Testing the limits of the playing surface the Cardinals plan to use as the centerpiece of their $450 million stadium when it opens in 2006: a retractable field. Imagine a gigantic rectangular planter 18 inches deep with dirt and grass, and mounted on rails.

"We've got marching bands marching, and big gorillas tackling each other -- we've got to make sure the floor doesn't move beneath them," says Larry Griffis, president of the structures division of Walter P. Moore, one of the leading stadium engineering firms in the U.S. Mr. Griffis is currently working on three National Football League projects and is a leading expert on retractable stadium roofs.

Now he has to deal with a retractable floor -- the first of its kind for a stadium in the U.S. Mr. Griffis is worried not so much that the field will collapse under the weight of the titans, but that the vibrations will make the players feel uneasy. "It's not a structural issue, but a perception issue," he says.

The next generation of NFL arenas is pushing the bounds of stadium engineering way beyond the old bowl-like, exposed-to-the-elements structures of the past, and even beyond more recent indoor venues. Football stadiums these days must serve as team icons, with bold, distinctive designs that render them easily recognizable for brand identity. They also have to be functionally and environmentally versatile, to tap other kinds of event revenue than just football.

The Cardinals, for their part, hired New York architect Peter Eisenman, something of a maverick in design circles as well as a football fanatic. The architect responded by conjuring a vision inspired by the team's Southwest desert setting: a barrel cactus. Curved metallic panels will alternate with glass strips around the exterior of the building, scheduled for completion before the 2006 season. A retractable roof will let air in on temperate winter Sundays. And in a bid to have both natural turf and a building that makes money year-round, the Cardinals are betting on their grass field on wheels. Even during football season, the field will be able to roll outside next to the parking lot during the week so it can soak up the warm Arizona sun while conferences and meetings take place indoors.

This is relatively new territory for engineers. Only a handful of stadiums in Japan and Europe have experimented with retractable fields. Mr. Griffis tried to learn about the Veltins Arena in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, near Munich. But the tight-lipped builders didn't want to compare notes, Mr. Griffis says. "We're sort of inventing the wheels ourselves," he says, referring not only to the field but the rollers underneath.

The NFL's two other teams with funds to move forward with new stadium blueprints are Indianapolis and Dallas. The Indianapolis Colts unveiled their design this year, by Dallas architects HKS Inc. The shape is inspired by the classic Indiana field house, a square building with sloped roof, which in this case will be retractable.

The sloping roof, in fact, poses a challenge to the engineers since it also has to move. "It's basically a combination of crane and railroad technology being utilized on a moving roof rather than, say, unloading containers on a ship," says Brian Trubey, the architect on the Indianapolis and Dallas stadiums. Every retractable roof is a challenge, Mr. Trubey says, because each stadium's shape is different. Mr. Trubey says he lets his buddy Mr. Griffis worry about the particulars. "There's some good engineers who know how to do that," he kids.

Mr. Griffis responds, only half-kiddingly, with a complaint often heard from engineers: that architects come up with designs that are difficult to build while staying within the budget. "A lot of these architects are great at getting them to look good," Mr. Griffis says of modern stadiums, "but not so good at the price tag. It can get pretty tense. We're going through that with Mr. Trubey right now."

Before Arizona, Mr. Griffis's biggest football-stadium challenge was for the Houston Texans' Reliant Stadium -- the first NFL venue with a retractable roof. As in Arizona, financial pressures forced the stadium owners to seek additional revenue from other kinds of events. The solution: the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo, an annual 2 1/2-week run of lassos and bucking bulls that sells out every night. The show actually brings in more money than football, so it demanded some design changes.

Having multiple uses "adds a level of complexity to the design," says Mr. Griffis. For the rodeo, for instance, "we had to design for all the speakers and lights and banners they wanted to hang." That meant the retractable roof needed to support an additional 180,000 pounds. The solution: more steel supports.

Other recent proposals pushing at the edge of stadium design include the New York Jets' ambitious plan for a multipurpose stadium on the west side of Manhattan, an idea that was scuttled earlier this year. Designed by New York architects Kohn, Pedersen, Fox and by engineers Thornton-Tomasetti Group, also of New York, the retractable-roof stadium would have been built atop a busy railyard. The stadium also would have served as a convention center, concert hall and giant ballroom. And an early version of the plan envisioned a structure transformable from a 75,000-seat stadium into a 20,000-seat basketball or hockey arena.

While that project is unlikely to move forward, the Jets are considering other possibilities. One is to build a stadium in the borough of Queens. A potentially more innovative option would be to share a new stadium in East Rutherford, N.J., with their rivals the New York Giants-next to the facility the two already share.

The current situation has the Jets playing in Giants Stadium, the name clearly emblazoned on the outside of the structure. The Jets have long complained about the arrangement, saying the NFL is all about home-field advantage. The teams have been willing to discuss sharing a new stadium, however, because of design ideas being discussed that would make it a home for both franchises, such as massive changeable light displays that would mutate from one Sunday to the next: green for Jets, blue for Giants. After all, it's cheaper to build one stadium than two.

Recently at the Cardinals' practice facility in Phoenix, stadium designers kept their focus firmly on the floor as they tested a prototype for vibrations. The design calls for a series of steel rails running under the length of the field, from end zone to end zone, and serving as the tracks. Running crossways under the tray of dirt and grass are steel beams that will rest on boxes containing railroadlike wheels.

Before the test, Mr. Griffis's calculations said the span from rail to rail should be 23 feet in order to minimize the vibrations.

Thomas M. Murray and Mehdi Setareh, professors from Virginia Polytechnic Institute, brought a special shaking machine to simulate different intensities of vibration atop the section of the field. Volunteers from Mr. Griffis's team and the Cardinals' front office moved around on the shaking field to see whether the vibrations were perceptible to humans, while accelerometers measured the exact level of vibration.

One thing they found: The worst sort of event is coordinated jumping exercises -- the kind of thing that football players or marching bands often do. With everyone moving in unison, it increases the force and thus the vibration.

Shaking-building phenomenon is a product of modern construction material, and thus is not limited to stadiums. Convention centers, shopping-mall atriums and aerobics studios are notorious for their perceptible vibrations. Engineers say buildings weigh 40 percent less than they did before World War II, after which construction methods changed. Light steel and concrete have replaced brick and steel. Drywall has pushed aside masonry. Feather-light metal studs stand in for heavy pine.

For the Cardinals and their field, however, the challenge goes beyond vibrations. Because the tray of dirt and grass is exposed top and bottom to Arizona's desert heat when it's outside, the roots and stems of the grass can fry. Part of the experiment at the practice facility also was to determine how much water the grounds crew will need to sprinkle in order to keep the field fresh and green.

Another obstacle for the engineers was attaching Mr. Eisenman's unique cactus-shaped panels to the frame of the building. Despite the difficulty, the Cardinals think the result will be worth it, since beginning in 2006 millions of football fans will identify the team with televised blimp shots of their new stadium.

Mr. Trubey, the architect for the Colts, says television exerts a powerful force on stadium design. "You can argue that NFL venues are the most-seen type of architecture on television," he says. "As much time as we spend making it incredible for the people actually physically there, we believe the balance of the audience -- which is probably 99 percent of it -- hadn't been leveraged as a participant in terms of enhancing brand through the stadium."

Of course, even with a great brand, football can't take place without a big hunk of solid turf.

The Cardinals initial field vibration test proved crucial. Mr. Griffis and his team discovered that the 23-foot span between the rails was too wide. The fix: more rails spaced more closely together.

But that doesn't have them satisfied. On Sept 19 and 20, the team will do a "confirmation test" on a 30-foot-long, full-width slice of the actual field, this time with real players -- not engineers -- jumping around. If the pitch passes, workers will go ahead on the rest of the field without changes. Mr. Griffis is philosophical about all the tests. "We know from past experience that if you don't pay attention early in the design, it'll bite you in the end."

Ninjahedge
August 30th, 2005, 08:41 AM
OK, the perception issue is vibration.

The main problem with this is multifaceted. First, AZ is NOT the most friendly state to grass or ANY foliage, period.

Are they building this dome to have AC inside? or provide shade?

Also, any movable structure needs constant maintainance several orders higher than a fixed/immobile structure. Things like Shea Stadium come to mind when they talk about a movable field.

Third, ummmmm, barrel cactus? Alternating strips of metal and glass? Does that sound at all familiar to anyone? (albeit a material substitution...)

http://resor.nerdlabs.org/newyork/Big/185-Madison-Square-GardenB.jpg

ZippyTheChimp
August 30th, 2005, 04:36 PM
Forget all that technical stuff.

Just picture a chorus line of fat linemen - a grotesque parody of a Radio City Christmas Show, barrel cactus in place of fir trees.

TLOZ Link5
August 30th, 2005, 04:43 PM
The Radio City Super Bowl Shuffle Spectacular?

TonyO
August 31st, 2005, 10:13 AM
NY Times
August 31, 2005

Giants' Feud With Xanadu Is About More Than Traffic

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2005/08/31/nyregion/31meadow.jpg
The Giants say Xanadu's garages are not suited for tailgate parties.

By RONALD SMOTHERS
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J., Aug. 25 - If further evidence is needed that the car is king in New Jersey - and that matters of traffic and roads trump most other issues - look no further than the Meadowlands.

The New York Giants have gone to court to try to block their neighbor, the planned $1.3 billion Meadowlands Xanadu family entertainment and retail complex, from operating on game days, on the grounds that it would turn a trip to a Giants game from a mere traffic problem into a traffic nightmare.

The fight among the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, which owns the land; the Giants; and the developers of Meadowlands Xanadu appeared to be over last May when the team and the state agreed to a plan for a new privately financed $750 million football stadium on a separate parcel nearby.

But in papers filed in State Superior Court in Bergen County on Aug. 23, just a month before the team is to provide details about the new stadium, its lawyers sued, asking a judge to immediately restrict the operations of Xanadu, now under construction.

According to their court papers, the Giants say their fans' No. 1 complaint involves getting into and out of the stadium grounds on game days - a feat that involves 24,000 cars and as many as 80,000 fans. With Xanadu, 12,000 cars will be added to the mix, both sides agree.

Some of the cars will be shunted to Xanadu's garages, affecting those fans' ability to indulge in that parking lot tradition, tailgate parties.

The Giants say they are actually losing parking spaces. But the lawsuit is about more than parking, the team concedes. With details of the new stadium to be worked out, the suit is an attempt by the team to gain leverage in talks with Xanadu's developers and to strengthen its hand in dealing with the sports and exposition authority. In particular, the team wants court enforcement of a provision in its lease that makes its consent required for any changes in the complex that affect the team's operations on game days or compete with them.

The issue seems to have become a matter of pride for John Mara, the executive vice president of the Giants. In an interview, Mr. Mara spoke wistfully about the decision his father, Wellington Mara, made in 1971 to move the Giants from Yankee Stadium. There, they were "second-class tenants." To get the true football stadium he desired, he decided to move his team to what was then a vast marsh and vacant expanse of filled-in dump.

One editorial cartoon at the time depicted the elder Mr. Mara, cloaked like George Washington on a snowy winter night, standing at the prow of a boat, being rowed by football players onto a shore strewn with broken bottles, crushed cans and litter. There was wide speculation, apart from New York-centric chauvinism, that the move to New Jersey would be a disaster for the team.

It was in that atmosphere that the Giants managed to get provisions in their lease that gave them a virtual veto over alterations at the site that might affect their operations. John Mara says those provisions are crystal clear, but Carl J. Goldberg, the chairman of the sports and exposition authority, insists they are not.

Andrew Zimbalist, a sports economist and professor at Smith College, said such clauses were common in stadium lease arrangements around the country. "They are designed to maximize space and thereby maximize revenues for the team," he said.

Mr. Mara said the Giants feel they must invoke the provisions to protect their interests. "It was a decision by my family that gave rise to this entire complex," he said. "And to be honest, we are starting to feel like second-class citizens over here."

Xanadu's retail operations would be closed on Sunday game days because of county blue laws, but restaurants and other activities would be open. Mr. Goldberg said Giants fans could stick around to eat and play, and the drawn-out day could actually decrease the traffic congestion immediately after the games.

A planned rail link to the Meadowlands could reduce traffic by as many as 10,000 to 20,000 cars, officials have estimated. Martin E. Robins of the Alan M. Voorhees Transportation Center at Rutgers University said an efficient rail connection would come to be accepted by fans "over time."

But Mr. Zimbalist is skeptical. "These are people of means who want to drive and are not going to take public transportation," he said.

Mr. Mara said the blue laws affect only Sundays, and more and more league games are on Mondays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, putting the stadium in direct competition with Xanadu - a situation that the anticompetition and noninterference clauses are meant to address.

The Xanadu developers say they have offered traffic improvements, to be carried out on a timetable to be negotiated with the team. Further, they have agreed to spend $80 million on road construction. Michael Turner, a spokesman for the developers, the Mills Corporation and the Mack-Cali Realty Corporation, also said that whatever the team loses in surface parking would be more than made up by Xanadu's parking decks.

Mr. Mara is holding fast, insisting that Xanadu not be allowed to open on game days until all of the road improvements are completed and proven to work. He said deck parking is no alternative for football fans and tailgate partygoers.

George R. Zoffinger, the president of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, who carried out Gov. James E. McGreevey's mission to broaden the use of the Meadowlands by bringing in Xanadu, said the Giants' stance was "all about the money." He said the team was hobbling efforts to better use the land for creating jobs and producing tax revenues for the state.

Mr. Mara said he realizes that the lawsuit and the team's tough stance could jeopardize plans for the new stadium. But he said it was a chance he had to take. "This lawsuit is necessary for us to preserve our rights as we go into any new negotiations," he said. "We only have 10 home games a year, and Xanadu has the other 355 days to operate."

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2005/08/31/nyregion/20050831_MEADOW.gif

Ninjahedge
August 31st, 2005, 01:37 PM
This looks like an initial request that they will scale back to some agreement on parking/traffic control.


Hmmmm hmmm hmmmm, laaa laaaaaa.

/me whistles casually

Ninjahedge
August 31st, 2005, 01:40 PM
It also looks like they are fearing that they will no longer be the "fat cat" of the meadowlands area, being able to dictate, at will, the development and interests of the surrounding area.

With the large Mega-Mall from hell moving in, they will have to compete with the Gap, Bananna Republic, Old Navy and Starbucks on gameday and all other days.

And from what it sounds like on here, it seems like those pesky blue laws are not a concern here. I wonder what is the deal with that......

TomAuch
September 1st, 2005, 03:42 PM
Has Bergen County ever considered abolishing blue laws? Then again, don't homeowners there have people that inspect their lawns?

Ninjahedge
September 1st, 2005, 04:17 PM
They have been petitioned to do so, with the store owners saying that it would relieve traffic on Saturdays.

But then the traffic study guys looked at the mall traffic in Wayne on Sunday and told them to buzz off.

If you have ever been on routes 4 and 17 on a weekend you will know how slow traffic is because of the malls. It is a good thing to have the blue laws, although the reasoning behind them (religious) is BAAAAAD.

STT757
September 1st, 2005, 04:27 PM
Getting into the Garden State Plaza Mall parking gargage is a no-no, I learned that the hard way. That mall while having nice stores, Legal Seafood and Orange Julius is unbelievably crowded.

NewYorkYankee
September 1st, 2005, 09:30 PM
What are blue laws?

Ninjahedge
September 2nd, 2005, 08:41 AM
They are a lightly colored law. Kind of halfway between sky and azure.... ;)



JK, Blue Laws, whiule I do not know the derivation of the term, refer to moralistic laws that follow certain value sets put forth by the community. Things like when bars can operate, what liquors, and when a store can sell (NJ cannot sell liquor in a grocery store!) and other commercial venue restrictions (no retail sales of non-essentials on Sunday).


Maybe someone else can help with the origins, or you could just Google it... ;)

pianoman11686
September 14th, 2005, 02:10 AM
Giants Make Another Offer for Stadium at Meadowlands

By CHARLES V. BAGLI and RICHARD SANDOMIR

Published: September 14, 2005

With just days left before an agreement to build a new $800 million football stadium in the Meadowlands in New Jersey expires, the Giants tried to revive their stalled project by offering to settle all their differences with the developers of Xanadu, the $2 billion entertainment and retail center at the sports complex.

The Giants asked the developers, the Mills Corporation and Mack-Cali Realty, only to provide more parking spaces and support the team's stadium proposal over a more ambitious plan from the Jets.

But the Xanadu developers refused to take sides, squashing the last-minute attempt to build an alliance. The decision leaves the fate of the stadium uncertain.

Under an agreement struck last April between Acting Gov. Richard J. Codey and the Giants, the team has until tomorrow to work out a master plan with the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority and cooperating agreements with Xanadu and the Jets. But there has been little or no progress on any front, and state officials have essentially blamed John K. Mara and Steven E. Tisch, co-owners of the Giants.

Until the overture this week, the Giants had been hostile to Xanadu, fearing that the complex would generate traffic congestion and interfere with tailgating fans on game day. The team filed lawsuits in an attempt to block Xanadu's construction, but the effort has so far been unsuccessful.

The Jets, however, unveiled a proposal for a joint Giants-Jets stadium that calls for "an N.F.L. showplace" integrating sports, entertainment and retail into one project. The proposal is much more in tune with the Xanadu developers' plans and has been praised by the sports authority.

But the developers said they would remain neutral.

"Our goal is to build Xanadu," said Robert G. Sommer, a spokesman for the developers. "We are not in the football stadium business, but we desire an agreement between the Giants and the Jets for a new stadium."

John Mara, executive vice president of the Giants, flew to Virginia on Monday to meet with Laurence C. Siegel, chairman of the Mills Corporation, to discuss the proposal, according to one person briefed on the meeting. But Mr. Mara declined to discuss the gambit yesterday.

"We've had discussions on and off and we're trying to conduct these discussions in private, notwithstanding the efforts of others," he said. "We're continuing to have discussions with Mills and we remain hopeful."

In the last few weeks, chances for an agreement have dimmed. On Sept. 1, Carl Goldberg, chairman of the sports authority, sent a letter to the Giants deploring the team's failure to reach the required agreements with Xanadu. Given the Giants' "intractable" positions and "increasingly truculent tone," he said, he reluctantly planned to "consider the termination" of the memorandum of understanding at the authority's meeting on Friday.

Last month, Mr. Goldberg criticized the quality of the Giants' stadium design, which did not include the Jets' logo.

Mr. Goldberg's letter represents a remarkable turnaround. In April, he was tapped by Governor Codey to cement a deal with the Giants. He and the governor negotiated an agreement that provided the Giants with generous terms, including the rights to develop 75 acres, up from the 29 acres now used by the teams.

The team would pay the construction costs of the stadium, or split it with the Jets if the Jets chose to remain in New Jersey.

The state would pay for infrastructure costs, which are estimated at $30 million but could run higher. And while the team would pay for demolition of the old stadium, the state would be left with the remaining debt on the structure, about $100 million.

The path to an agreement that includes the Jets has proved to be full of obstacles, and many state officials say they are the Giants' fault. The Jets are exploring a move to Queens.

But if time runs out on the current agreement, the Giants may face a much less sympathetic governor. Both Senator Jon S. Corzine, a Democrat, and his Republican opponent for governor, Douglas R. Forrester, have been critical of the terms of a deal with the Giants, saying the state is footing too much of the bill.

But the Giants still might file revised plans. Mr. Mara promised last month that the team would submit a proposal that complies with all of the state's requirements.

"The sports authority would like to see a two-team stadium with the technology that can make it either team's home on game day," said George Zoffinger, president of the sports authority. "It should have a retractable roof so the state will garner revenues from a Super Bowl, the Final Four, political conventions and other events."

Copyright 2005 The New York Times Company

ZippyTheChimp
September 17th, 2005, 09:56 AM
September 17, 2005
Giants and Jets Have 10 Days to Work Out a Stadium Deal

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2005/09/17/nyregion/17stadium184.jpg
Giants Stadium LLC
An artist's rendering of the proposed Meadowlands football stadium complex, to be shared by two teams.

By CHARLES V. BAGLI (http://query.nytimes.com/search/query?ppds=bylL&v1=CHARLES V. BAGLI&fdq=19960101&td=sysdate&sort=newest&ac=CHARLES V. BAGLI&inline=nyt-per)

It is now up to the Giants and the Jets whether there will be a new stadium complex in the Meadowlands.

The board of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority voted yesterday to give the Giants a 10-day extension, until Sept. 29, to work out their differences with the Jets over the ground rules and design of the complex, and to form a "50-50 partnership" to operate a new football stadium. If a deal cannot be reached, the sports authority will end an April agreement signed by the state and the Giants to build a vast stadium complex on 75 acres of public land in the Meadowlands.

The two teams have divergent views on the size and shape of the stadium, the location of a practice field and certain retail operations, as well as the stadium's relationship to Xanadu, the $2 billion retail and entertainment complex that would share the property.

But while none of the issues appear insurmountable, a deal with the Jets would require a fundamental change in the Giants' position as the pre-eminent tenant at the sports complex. No longer would the Jets have to play in a stadium emblazoned with the electric blue letters of another team.

The Jets, in turn, would have to give up any plans, real or otherwise, of moving to Queens.

"It must be a real, genuine 50-50 partnership," said Carl Goldberg, chairman of the sports authority. "I don't think the differences are so significant as to preclude a meeting of the minds."

But the jockeying for position continued, with the Jets trying to maintain maximum leverage.

"We remain concerned that the stadium proposal developed by the Giants does not address such fundamental areas of concern as stadium configuration and business terms," the Jets said in a statement late yesterday afternoon. "We will continue to work toward resolution of these issues, but it is unreasonable to expect such a complex agreement could be concluded in just 10 days."

In the meantime, the Jets said they would continue to explore their options, including a new football and soccer stadium in Queens.

The vote to extend the deadline came after weeks of public sparring by the sports authority, the Giants, the Jets and the developers of Xanadu.

With the April agreement on the verge of collapse, the Giants finally submitted their master plan on Thursday for an 80,000-seat, two-team stadium, a training operation and a sports-oriented retail center, which was required by the April agreement.

A second condition set by the state, for the Giants to come to terms with Xanadu, was cleared 15 minutes before the authority's board met yesterday and another deadline expired. The Giants struck a definitive agreement with Xanadu's developers, acknowledging, at least for now, that the retail center would not interfere with game-day operations.

"This was obviously a huge hurdle," said John K. Mara, the Giants' chief operating officer. "We're relieved to have it behind us. We're now onto the next step, reaching an agreement with the Jets."

The developers agreed to give the Giants $15 million, a part of which would go to the Jets, to offset any game-day disruptions caused by construction activity. But they declined to back the Giants' master plan, saying that stadium details have to be worked out between the two teams.

The developers gave the Giants the right to sue them up to two years after the new stadium opens if Xanadu results in extra traffic congestion or interferes with tailgating fans.

While the Giants had largely ignored Xanadu in the past, their master plan now shows a bridge to the retail and entertainment complex over Route 120 and a soon-to-be-built rail station.

After sharply criticizing the quality of the Giants' plans and bargaining posture, Mr. Goldberg yesterday went out of this way to praise the work done by Mr. Mara over the past 48 hours.

"We are genuinely pleased by the progress made by the football Giants," Mr. Goldberg said.

In an interview yesterday, Mr. Mara said that the Giants and Jets should form an equal partnership. "At the end of the day, both us will realize that this deal makes so much sense," he said. "It's in both our interests to consummate something as quickly as possible."

But last month, the Giants displayed preliminary stadium plans that had the Giants logo splashed across it, but neglected to name the presumed co-owner. The omission was regarded by the Jets as a snub. Mr. Mara said yesterday that it was a misunderstanding.

Still, the Jets are not eager to put everything behind one option after their bruising, five-year, $65 million effort to build a stadium in Manhattan ended in failure. The team has pursued two options, one in New Jersey (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/national/usstatesterritoriesandpossessions/newjersey/index.html?inline=nyt-geo) and one in Queens.

But the effort to quickly forge a deal in New Jersey would undercut Queens, which requires a lengthy state approval process to turn over the public parkland the team wants to a private user.

Despite talk of Queens, Mr. Goldberg said yesterday that based on his conversations with L. Jay Cross, the Jets' president, he thought the team was "truly committed to being in New Jersey."

"Their focus and resources are exclusively on a football stadium at the sports complex," Mr. Goldberg said.

If the teams are able to agree, some of the money for a new stadium could come from the National Football League, which provides teams with up to $150 million for construction.

With two teams involved, Mr. Mara said, "There's a strong argument that could be made that we're entitled to more than $150 million, and maybe as much as $300 million."

State officials have played an active role in the negotiations, in part hoping that a new stadium agreement can be reached while Acting Gov. Richard J. Codey is still in office. The Giants and the Jets would also rather get a deal done sooner, rather than later.

Both candidates for governor - Senator Jon S. Corzine, a Democrat, and Douglas R. Forrester, the Republican-have been critical of the financial terms of the April deal for a stadium, which they say shifts too much of the burden onto taxpayers.

Copyright 2005 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html) The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)

ZippyTheChimp
September 26th, 2005, 12:35 PM
Tagliabue enters talks on Giants-Jets stadium


Wednesday, September 21, 2005 BY MATTHEW FUTTERMAN
Star-Ledger Staff
NFL Commissioner Paul Tagliabue has jumped into the negotiations for a shared stadium for the Jets and the Giants.

Five executives involved with the discussions said Tagliabue met with Giants Chief Operating Officer John Mara and Jets owner Woody Johnson yesterday to discuss the progress of the talks.

The teams have until Sept. 29 to work out a deal or the state has said it will terminate the agreement acting Gov. Richard Codey signed with the Giants in April to build a new stadium at the Meadowlands Sports Complex.

NFL spokesman Greg Aiello said the league would not comment on the discussions, but Tagliabue has made no secret of his desire for the two sides to reach a deal so the NFL can have a premiere facility in the nation's largest market.

Tagliabue has pushed for a Super Bowl in Giants Stadium, and the league awarded the Jets the 2010 Super contingent on the team reaching a deal to build a stadium on the West Side of Manhattan. That deal collapsed in June.

Since then, the Jets have said they want to play in a shared stadium in New Jersey but have also held preliminary meetings with officials in Queens.

Negotiating a deal between the Jets and Giants will not be easy.

The two sides remain far apart on the design of the facility and 45 acres of surrounding development.

Carl Goldberg, chairman of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, the state agency that operates the Meadowlands Sports Complex, said he spoke with the Jets' Johnson on Sunday and Mara and Giants executive vice president Steve Tisch on Monday, but knew of little progress in the talks.

"Hopefully, we'll be getting a good report from them soon," Goldberg said.

© 2005 The Star Ledger© 2005 NJ.com All Rights Reserved.

ZippyTheChimp
September 29th, 2005, 08:06 AM
September 29, 2005

Jets and Giants Near Deal on New Jersey Stadium

By CHARLES V. BAGLI (http://query.nytimes.com/search/query?ppds=bylL&v1=CHARLES V. BAGLI&fdq=19960101&td=sysdate&sort=newest&ac=CHARLES V. BAGLI&inline=nyt-per)

In a sudden turnabout after weeks of jostling, name-calling and bitterness, the Jets (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/sports/profootball/nationalfootballleague/newyorkjets/index.html?inline=nyt-org) and the Giants (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/sports/profootball/nationalfootballleague/newyorkgiants/index.html?inline=nyt-org) were close yesterday to signing a 50-50 partnership agreement to finance and build a football stadium in the Meadowlands, the first of its kind for teams in the National Football League, according to executives involved in the negotiations.

The breakthrough in the tempestuous negotiations came late Tuesday night during a five-hour meeting at the Meadowlands racetrack between Acting Gov. Richard J. Codey; John Mara, co-owner of the Giants; Woody Johnson, the Jets' owner; their respective lawyers; and Carl Goldberg, chairman of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, which oversees the Meadowlands sports complex.

The owners of the two teams, which are rivals on the field but co-occupants of the existing stadium, agreed to submit many of the most contentious issues - including the size and shape of the new stadium and the location of practice fields - to binding arbitration, according to two executives involved in the discussions. Although the partnership agreement would put to rest for now any talk of the Jets building a stadium in Queens and would allow Governor Codey to claim victory, there is no guarantee that the two sides will not have a falling out and scuttle the deal at some point in the future.

If it holds, however, the Giants and the Jets will be able to develop a modern stadium complex on 75 acres, up from 29 acres today, with luxury boxes, premium seating, sports-oriented stores, a hall of fame and a new rail connection. The teams would split the cost of the project, which is expected to be more than $800 million, and would, presumably, develop their own advertising and marketing while sharing revenues from naming rights.

The stadium would also have a connection to Xanadu, the $2 billion retail and entertainment complex that will share the property.

"I am very encouraged by the progress in keeping both teams in New Jersey (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/national/usstatesterritoriesandpossessions/newjersey/index.html?inline=nyt-geo)," said George R. Zoffinger, president of the sports authority. "Our next objective is to make sure there is a retractable roof, so we can attract the Super Bowl and other events, something that is supported by the commissioner of the N.F.L."

Yesterday afternoon, the team owners and their lawyers gathered again at 2:30 in Mr. Goldberg's office at the Meadowlands in hopes of coming to terms. The meeting broke up at 7:15 p.m. without a final deal, but the teams agreed to meet again this morning to settle the outstanding issues. Several officials involved in the talks said they were optimistic that an agreement could be reached by 5 p.m. today, the deadline.

"We feel like we have made progress," a Giants spokesman, Pat Hanlon, said last night, "and we are going to sit down again tomorrow in hopes of reaching an agreement."

Never before have two football teams agreed to build a stadium together. The Jets joined the Giants at Giant Stadium in 1984 because they had nowhere else to go after fleeing the confines of Shea Stadium in Queens. But the Jets have always resented playing in a stadium named after a rival team.

"This would be the first example of a stadium being developed from the outset for two N.F.L. teams," said Marc Ganis, president of Sportscorp, a sports business consulting firm based in Chicago. "The cost of these buildings has skyrocketed to such a degree that it makes far more economic sense to share the debt service and the revenues. The net revenues for the two teams are likely to be significantly better than if they each built their own stadium."

That does not mean that it was easy for the teams to get even this far. At separate moments over the last month, each team has been cast as a villain by the other parties in the negotiations.

Then early this week, L. Jay Cross, the Jets' president, formally told Paul Tagliabue, commissioner of the National Football League, that the team was also considering building a $1.3 billion stadium on 15 acres in a park near Shea Stadium, infuriating New Jersey officials who said Mr. Cross had committed to New Jersey.

Mr. Cross then gave the sports authority a list of "preconditions" to a partnership with the Giants that included items sure to be unacceptable to the Giants, Xanadu or the sports authority. Talks seemed headed for a breakdown. But at least two issues continued to loom large in the teams' negotiating calculus, and prevented a total collapse. Both teams realized that if the Giants refused to relinquish their role as the marquee tenant at the Meadowlands and failed to accommodate the Jets, the tentative deal for a new stadium on 75 acres was unlikely to get sweeter.

Both the Democratic candidate for governor, Senator Jon S. Corzine, and his Republican opponent, Douglas R. Forrester, have been critical of what they view as the overly generous terms of the deal offered by Governor Codey.

And the sports authority refused to budge on its deadline - today - for the two teams to form a joint venture. This left the Jets with too little time to play out their strategy. The Jets had pursued stadium deals in both the Meadowlands and Queens ever since their five-year, $65 million effort to build a stadium in Manhattan died in June.

But while the team was able to line up support for a Queens stadium among local elected officials, it could not hope to gain the support of Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg until after Election Day.

The sports authority and the Giants insisted that the Jets choose between New York and New Jersey. The Jets could have bailed out of the negotiations with New Jersey and, under the terms of its lease at the Meadowlands, sued to block the Giants from building their own stadium.

According to two people involved in the negotiations who insisted on anonymity because of the continuing talks, Mr. Tagliabue told the Jets that it would not be a good idea for the team to try to foil plans for a new Giants stadium if it was truly interested in moving to Queens. That meant the Jets would have been left as a tenant of the Giants in New Jersey with the hope of getting a New York stadium at some point in the future. Hours later, on Tuesday evening, the Jets and Giants neared an agreement to form a partnership and submit to binding arbitration.

Copyright 2005 (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/copyright.html) The New York Times Company (http://www.nytco.com/)

STT757
September 29th, 2005, 05:47 PM
Acting Governor Richard Codey just announced the deal on the Mike and the Mad Dog show on WFAN, looks like the NFL will contribute $300 Million towards the stadium. It will host the Super Bowl, which means a retractable roof.

Also the NY Jets will move their Headquarters and practice facilities from Hoftstra to Monmouth Race Track in Long Branch New Jersey, located on the Jersey Shore in Monmouth County near Monmouth University.

STT757
September 29th, 2005, 10:13 PM
Here's the audio interview of Governor Codey on the Mike and the Mad Dog program.

http://wfan.com/homepage/local_audioclip_272180332.html

Teno
September 30th, 2005, 01:32 PM
The economic impact is minor. The number of jobs created by sports facilities is in the hundreds, and while that is OK in and of itself, it is a poor ROI for public investment.


Depends on how a city leverages its sports facility. With imagination and forsight a stadium can be used for far more events than only NFL football.

The Georgia Dome in Atlanta has been host to:

Centennial Olympic Games (1996)
Super Bowl XXVIII (1994)
Super Bowl XXXIV (2000)
NBA ALL Star Game (2003)
The Atlanta Falcons
The Peach Bowl
The Heritage Bowl
The Pioneer Bowl
SEC Football Championships
U.S. Indoor Track and Field Championships
Atlanta Hawks (1998-1999)
NCAA basketball
The Georgia High School Football Playoffs
The Georgia/Florida High School Basketball All-Star Game
Georgia high school and college football championships
NCAA Final Four in 2003 (women)
NCAA South Regional 2004 (men)

Future Events at the Georgia Dome

SEC basketball tournaments in 2004, 2005 and 2008 (men)
NCAA Final Four in 2007 (men)
ACC basketball tournament in 2009 (men)
Super Bowl XXXXIII 2009 (Bidding)

The Georgia World Congress Center is 3.9 million square feet facility, with 3.4 million visitors anually. Its economic impact was $1.9 billion in 2001.



Compare it to the economic impact of Goldman Sachs - thousands of jobs, not seasonal, but every day, generating other jobs in the area. It is why, as painful as it was, the city had no choice but to give GS the money.


Goldman Sachs has recently reported a record profit of 1.6 billion. GS will create new jobs but like any business will take the lions share of the profit.

A sports franchise and sports stadium like any property can make a lot of money or make little to no money, depends on how you leverage it to your benefit.

NJ has the opportunity to leverage this new stadium and its proximity to Xanadu into a great advantage.

I wholly disagree that NYC could not leverage a stadium to its own advantage.

Teno
September 30th, 2005, 01:38 PM
The Jets going back to NJ also show me they were not really fully committed to their own stadium.

If they weren't prepared to go all the way, there was little point in trying.

ZippyTheChimp
September 30th, 2005, 02:01 PM
We went over this same stuff in the Westside thread. In fact, I remember you posted the same events, but that is not proof of anything. Your list is not supported by any data that these events make enough money to warrant public investment. You only think they do, because of all the hype attached to the event.

But if you make a comparison between the economic activity generated by a major company employing thousands and a sports franchise, you will find that it is not even close. Check the Gehry-Brooklyn Nets thread and read the economic forecast for public revenue expected from the Nets.

Besides, even compared to other NFL franchises, the Jets are a lousy organization, poorly managed on and field and in the front office. That's why we've had this silly circus the last few years.

Maybe you should reread the Westside thread, and note all the things you said about the development against what I said.

So, who had it right, and who had it wrong?

Teno
September 30th, 2005, 02:38 PM
Your list is not supported by any data that these events make enough money to warrant public investment. You only think they do, because of all the hype attached to the event.


I did find a detailed break down of the economic benefit of the Georgia Dome and Georgia World Congress Center. Through the 90's it was largely profitable and made billions for the state of Georgia. The center took a downturn at the turn of the centry as did most of the national economy. But it has still always remained profitable.

Its profit vs public investment must be good enough for the state of Georgia as they continue to invest money in the center's expansion and development.

The chart was too detailed to compile for a posting. And I don't have time to search for it right now to find a link.



Check the Gehry-Brooklyn Nets thread and read the economic forecast for public revenue expected from the Nets.


Yes I've seen that. A smaller basketball arena is not even able to host the events I listed. It should also be obvious that two basketball areas are not going to make as much money as one basketball arena.



So, who had it right, and who had it wrong?


The out come has not proven or disproven what either of us has said in the Westside thread. The reason the stadium failed was purely politics. It had little to do with its economic viability.

The outcome does show us this..



Besides, even compared to other NFL franchises, the Jets are a lousy organization, poorly managed on and field and in the front office. That's why we've had this silly circus the last few years.


On that I can agree with you. The West Side would have been an important development, and would have been a waste if The Jets bungled it. So its probably good they didn't get it.

kliq6
September 30th, 2005, 02:49 PM
As for the claim in the Jets Queens post that NJ gets jobs when the Jets move there HQ there, that strue but there HQ was on LI, so NYCl ooses no jobs. the offic ethey had in Midtown was only for people involved with the development of the NY Stadium

STT757
September 30th, 2005, 03:54 PM
Long Island looses jobs and the State of NY looses the tax revenues from their large salaries.

With regards to the Stadium this is a huge deal for NJ as the State is not putting money into the stadium, just roads and Rail connection. The NFL is going to give the teams $300 Million which will go towards the retractable roof, this will bring the Super Bowl to the Meadowlands as well as other events like the Final Four or possibly even a College Bowl Game.

kliq6
September 30th, 2005, 04:13 PM
True the state loses money, but honestly i hate NY State, I love NYC and i dont care if the rest of the states economy tanks. I wish NYC could leave the state but we cant, its just such a poorly run place

NY states economy, outside of NYC is actually one of the worst in the nation. 90% of firms that want to leave the city because of cost go to NJ or CT, suburbian NY is rarely considered. Outside of IBM, Pepsico and a few other is Westchester, The states economy stinks

Sorry to rant , this is for another thread

ZippyTheChimp
September 30th, 2005, 04:28 PM
With all the new stadiums coming on line, how often do you think the Super Bowl will roll in- once every 12 years? The inside-the-stadium benefit will go to the NFL, and NYC will still get a share of the outside-the-stadium benefit.

Like no one making a trip to a Super Bowl in NJ would bother going to Manhattan? From the article on Tagliabue:

Tagliabue has made no secret of his desire for the two sides to reach a deal so the NFL can have a premiere facility in the nation's largest market.Would the NFL bother if NYC was not on the other side of the river?

And without the Jets in the way, we still get to develop the Westside. So while this is a good deal for NJ, in that the stadium will be more efficiently used and be privately funded; it will not be as big a deal economically for the state. It will be for the teams and the NFL. That is the one constant everywhere they are built. For NYC, having the Jets out of the city will be a net gain in revenue.

normaldude
September 30th, 2005, 04:55 PM
Long Island looses jobs and the State of NY looses the tax revenues from their large salaries.

NYC/NY should have courted the Giants & Jets earlier on for a joint Queens stadium. After all, stadium deals for Yankees and Mets were done fairly painlessly.

Instead, NYC wasted time trying to make a $600 million corporate welfare payment for a wildly unpopular West Side Stadium, thus letting NJ seal a deal with the Giants, and have the upper hand in an eventual joint football stadium.


With regards to the Stadium this is a huge deal for NJ as the State is not putting money into the stadium, just roads and Rail connection.

That's the way it should be. Public sector funds should be spent on public sector projects.


The NFL is going to give the teams $300 Million which will go towards the retractable roof, this will bring the Super Bowl to the Meadowlands as well as other events like the Final Four or possibly even a College Bowl Game.

That's the way it should be. If for-profit, private sector companies want a store/stadium/building/roof where they'll get 100% of the net profits, then they should pay for it themselves.

NYC really dodged a bullet with the West Side Stadium scam. A football stadium and/or retractable roof should be paid by the NFL and the private-sector sports teams, not the tax payers. NY is full of businesses generating tax revenue & jobs, and none of them got a $600 million corporate welfare payment. Additionally, the West Side Stadium deal would have given a $1 billion piece of waterfront Manhattan property away for $250 million.

If the NFL does pay $300 million for a retractable roof, and the Meadowlands gets events like Superbowl/NCAA Final Four/College Bowl games, then NYC will be the big winner. NYC will have paid zero tax dollars, but still end up with recurring economic benefits as tourists come to the area.

In the weekend surrounding the Superbowl/NCAA Final Four/College Bowl game, tourists would stay a Manhattan hotels, eat at Manhattan restaurants, party at Manhattan bars & clubs, go to Broadway shows, shop on 5th Avenue, and then go to the Meadowlands for the big game. I'm fairly certain that someone coming to town for a Superbowl weekend will spend more time in Manhattan than at suburban NJ malls or bars in Hoboken.

TomAuch
October 1st, 2005, 03:52 AM
True the state loses money, but honestly i hate NY State, I love NYC and i dont care if the rest of the states economy tanks. I wish NYC could leave the state but we cant, its just such a poorly run place

NY states economy, outside of NYC is actually one of the worst in the nation. 90% of firms that want to leave the city because of cost go to NJ or CT, suburbian NY is rarely considered. Outside of IBM, Pepsico and a few other is Westchester, The states economy stinks

Sorry to rant , this is for another thread

North of Westchester/Putnam/Rockland is a depressed area akin to the Rustbelt. How often to you see a city of half a million (Buffalo) become a city of 200,000 over two generations?

injcsince81
October 1st, 2005, 07:42 AM
I wish NYC could leave the state..... snip....

C'mon down, New Jersey will take you, NYC!!!! :D

lofter1
October 1st, 2005, 08:42 AM
C'mon down, New Jersey will take you, NYC!!!! :D

Hmmm ... 51st State? Continue here: http://www.wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=50562&postcount=52

Teno
October 1st, 2005, 07:14 PM
That's the way it should be. If for-profit, private sector companies want a store/stadium/building/roof where they'll get 100% of the net profits, then they should pay for it themselves.


Just look to the Yankee's as an admirable example.

The Yankee's a very wealthy, very for profit organization are paying $800 million for their new stadiumn.

The city will give them the land to build the stadium. The city will pay $140 million to replace the the park land given to the Yankee's.

The Yankee's will pay no rent or property taxes, in where the city will loose at least $5 million in taxes annually.

normaldude
October 1st, 2005, 08:36 PM
Just look to the Yankee's as an admirable example.

The Yankee's a very wealthy, very for profit organization are paying $800 million for their new stadiumn.

The city will give them the land to build the stadium. The city will pay $140 million to replace the the park land given to the Yankee's.

The Yankee's will pay no rent or property taxes, in where the city will loose at least $5 million in taxes annually.

Ok, so let's compare..

Direct Corporate Welfare Payment:
- West Side Stadium: $600 million
- Yankee Stadium: $0

Indirect Land Subsidy:
- West Side Stadium: $673 million (1)
- Yankee Stadium: $140 million

Net Lost Tax Revenue:
- West Side Stadium: $462 million/yr (2)
- Yankee Stadium: $5 million/yr

Footnotes:
(1) West side rail yards were appraised at $923 million, and given to Jets in rigged bidding process for $250 million.
(2) A West Side Stadium was estimated to generate $52 million/yr in tax revenue, compared to $510 million/yr for a residential/commercial mixed-use development on the same space.
http://wirednewyork.com/forum/showpost.php?p=42184&postcount=1073


The West Side Stadium deal would have been the largest stadium scam in the history of civilization, with the largest direct & indirect subsidies ever.

The deals struck for the new Yankee stadium and the new Giants/Jets stadium are within reason, and most importantly, have no direct corporate welfare payment for the actual building owned by for-profit private sector businesses.

Teno
October 1st, 2005, 09:36 PM
To state that a for profit company should pay full price for infrasturcute that they will earn 100% of the profit. It should not matter if one project will cost more or less than another. Receiving public funds is recieveing public funds.

The city is paying $140 millin for the land and will forfeit any future rent or property taxes. The building would not exsist without the land.

Under the above statement. The Yankee's should either pay the $140 million value of the park land replacement. Or pay the city rent and property tax the same as everyone else.

NYguy
October 3rd, 2005, 07:01 PM
NY POST

JERSEY'S ALBANY SERVANTS


October 3, 2005 -- Are you happy now, Shelly Silver and Joe Bruno? Now that the Jets and Giants have agreed to build a new stadium in Jersey — and to shun New York for at least the next century?

Apparently, it wasn't enough that Gotham hasn't had a pro football team for the past 21 years.

So back in June, with the Jets begging to come to the West Side and spend some $1.6 billion of their own money for a new stadium, Assembly Speaker Silver and state Senate Majority Leader Bruno slammed the door in the team's face.

Silver's excuse? West Side development might compete with his district.

Bruno? His son had (overnight) become a handsomely paid lobbyist for Cablevision, which owns nearby Madison Square Garden and didn't want competition from a new stadium (more on that below).

Silver — and others, like mayoral wannabe Freddy Ferrer — said the Jets could eat cake, and build in Queens.

"I'm sure the Jets feel beholden to Mike Bloomberg" for backing their bid for the West Side, Ferrer said just last month. "But the simple fact is, we all knew that Jets stadium belonged in Queens."

Too bad no one told the Jets that.

Yes, the team considered Queens. But it really wanted Manhattan — and spent $70 million trying to get it.

At one point, the Jets said they'd never go to Queens. And the deal inked Thursday with the Giants for a facility in the Meadowlands (at a fraction of what they'd have spent in Manhattan) defines "never" as at least 99 years.

But Silver and Ferrer and Bruno never cared about giving the Culture Capital of the World a pro football team.

Or boosting the chances of winning the Olympics in 2012, which depended on building a West Side stadium.

Or all the money and jobs the Jets and Olympics would have brought.

Ferrer just wanted public money spent to lure the Jets to go, instead, into the pockets of his friends in the teachers and health-care unions. (Which, of course, was never possible anyway — and the unions won't get a dime more, even with the West Side plan scuttled.)

Silver, again, cared only about thwarting development he saw as too competitive with his district. Of course, that development, too, will take place anyway.

Bruno's son got his money from Cablevision — so the majority leader is happy.

But if you thought Cablevision was acting in good faith when it "outbid" the Jets for the rights to the MTA site where the stadium was to be built, consider the story Tom Topousis reported exclusively in Wednesday's Post: In e-mails sent during the battle over the stadium, Cablevision urged the supposedly independent Regional Plan Association to hike its estimate of the property's value.

"I told [RPA officials] their number [$475 million for the site] was low," Cablevision veep Andrew Lynn wrote in the e-mail. "In response, they are now thinking of modifying their numbers."

Cablevision also "donated" $10,000 to the RPA this year and last. And, lo and behold, the RPA's number came in at $900 million, nearly twice the original amount.

Clearly, the company was merely trying to make it harder for the Jets to get the site and had no plans to build anything there itself. As Jets lawyer David Boies points out, "If you're a buyer" — as Cablevision pretended it was — "you don't try to double the price."

In the end, Gotham lost out on pro football, the Olympics and all the business and jobs that would have gone with them.

And the MTA is stuck with the site, even as some said it would be "grabbed up" if put out to bid; the agency could have had hundreds of millions in the bank by now if it had sold the site to the Jets.

What a travesty. Shelly, Joe and Freddy should be ashamed.

lofter1
October 3rd, 2005, 07:37 PM
^ What a pathetic cry baby.

NYC doesn't need a stadium. NYC still gets the revenue from out of town folks who come to the area for football and party / stay in NYC. And we don't have to deal with the additional unneccesary traffic / congestion.

So cablevision are crooks and liars? Like this surprises you? So is Ratner, NFL, Bloomberg -- as well a Silver, etal. They're politicians, lawyers, financial wheeler-dealers, real estate moguls. What more needs to be said?

NJ NEEDS the stadium. At least until Xanadu gets built.

As for the olympics -- NYC didn't stand a chance on this go around.

JCMAN320
October 24th, 2005, 12:13 PM
Jets eye Hudson sites for training facility

Monday, October 24, 2005
By RONALD LEIR
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

The New York Jets are reportedly scouting several sites in New Jersey for their new practice facility - including a few in Hudson County.

A site in Jersey City, Bayonne or Secaucus could replace the Jets' current facility at Hofstra University on Long Island, which they've used since 1975.

"The people at Hofstra have been great to us," team general manager Terry Bradway said. "But to have an area that you can call your own - well, that's going to be real good for us.

"When it takes you 21/2 hours to get home after a home game, that can wear on you a bit."

While the planned $800 million stadium the Jets and the Giants will share in the Meadowlands won't be ready until at least the 2009 season, the Jets want to be operating in New Jersey much sooner than that, possibly by the middle of 2007. That means moving their training facilities and headquarters from Hofstra University to a yet-to-be-determined spot in New Jersey.

The Jets are motivated by the prospect of more space and convenience at a very affordable price - since the state has agreed to buy the land for the complex.

The Jets reportedly want a parcel of land - at least 20 acres - that will easily hold a 150,000-square-foot building for offices and weight training, three outdoor fields and a fourth field inside a bubble.

Among the Hudson County sites under consideration is a former landfill adjacent to the Secaucus Transfer Station in the Meadowlands, Secaucus Business Administrator Anthony Iacono said.

The owner of the 65-acre site, Dan Allen, said he talked to former New York Giant Bart Oates - now a real estate consultant with a connection to the Jets - about the possibility of making a deal.

"I let the Jets know that our land is available," Allen said.

A portion of the site also could be used as additional parking for the new Giants/Jets football stadium and tie into a proposed park-and-ride facility serving a possible Light Rail connection.

Bayonne Mayor Joseph V. Doria Jr. said that city officials would be happy to meet with the Jets to talk to them about any property in Bayonne, but the mayor didn't identify any potential sites.

Oates confirmed the Jets are eyeballing sites in Jersey City, Bayonne and Secaucus, but declined to be specific. He said the team also is considering locations in Perth Amboy and in Bergen County.

Newhouse News Service staff writer Matthew Futterman contributed to this report.

ZippyTheChimp
December 13th, 2005, 09:17 AM
December 13, 2005

Jets and Giants Hail Arena Plan, and Codey

By CHARLES V. BAGLI

The Jets and Giants unveiled preliminary plans for a joint stadium in the Meadowlands yesterday at a news conference that turned into a homage to New Jersey's acting governor, Richard J. Codey, who will leave that office next month.

Team owners and the chairman of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority complimented Mr. Codey for his role in fashioning what would be a unique deal in the National Football League, the first time that two teams have sought to build one stadium together.

"I don't believe this would have occurred without his involvement," said John Mara, chief operating officer of the Giants. "He was there at all the critical times to push one side or another, including the sports authority. It's been a dream of his for quite some time."

The preliminary master plan places the new complex between the existing stadium and the nearby Meadowlands racetrack, with links to a retail complex, a new rail station and the Xanadu entertainment and retail complex now under construction near the Continental Arena.

The teams hope to produce a final plan early next year and begin construction in 2007, so that the stadium can open in 2010.

The goalposts will be near the northern and southern ends of the stadium, which will include an atrium, a football hall of fame, team stores, restaurants and conference space, as opposed to the current east-west configuration. Although the complex will have as many as 200 luxury suites, up from 117, L. Jay Cross, the president of the Jets, said the two teams had not settled on the configuration of the stadium bowl itself.

The teams said that the decision to put a roof on the structure would depend on whether the N.F.L. agreed to double the usual $150 million allocation for a team building a stadium in a major city.

The Jets are scouring New Jersey for a suitable site for their training facility, which will move from Long Island, while the Giants will build their training center northwest of the current stadium.

John F. Lettiere, the New Jersey transportation commissioner, said the complex would be accompanied by $225 million in improvements to Routes 17 and 3 and Interchange 16 of the New Jersey Turnpike, as well as a new train station.

The transportation plan sparked criticism from mass transit advocates, who said that increasing the capacity of the highways surrounding the Meadowlands doomed the prospects for the train station. "If you make it easier for people to drive, people will drive," said Damien Newton, New Jersey coordinator for the Tri-State Transportation Campaign, an advocacy group.

Mr. Codey said the complex "will anchor the overall revitalization of the Meadowlands." He added that New Jersey residents would get the best stadium deal in the country because the teams would pay for the complex.

Still, taxpayers will pay a cost beyond the transportation improvements. Under the deal with the state, the teams will have the ability to develop 75 acres of state-owned land with stores, restaurants and entertainment, while paying a modest rent, less than $7 million a year. The state has also agreed to spend up to $30 million on infrastructure and to absorb the approximately $100 million debt on the old stadium, which will be demolished.

* Copyright 2005The New York Times Company

ZippyTheChimp
December 13th, 2005, 09:24 AM
Teams in accord on joint stadium

Tuesday, December 13, 2005

By JOHN BRENNAN
STAFF WRITER

The Giants and Jets were barely on speaking terms less than three months ago, seriously jeopardizing a plan for a new, jointly funded stadium.

But on Monday, there was not even a hint of lingering rancor as Giants and Jets executives unveiled a preliminary master plan for the replacement for 29-year-old Giants Stadium.

"This marks an important day, because we have made substantial progress in bringing this 50-50 project to paper," said the Jets' principal owner, Woody Johnson.

The document submitted Monday fixes the footprint of the 82,000-seat stadium as just north and east of the current Giants Stadium, and it includes considerable technical information regarding sewerage, electrical lines, potential traffic impacts and other details.
The National Football League teams also agreed to a new practice site location for the Giants. In the preliminary agreement in September, the Giants were scheduled to build that facility north of the new stadium, near The Meadowlands Racetrack.

Now the Giants are to build the practice complex southwest of the current stadium.
Jets President Jay Cross said the previous new site would have bumped up against the construction of a Pascack Valley rail link into the sports complex.

Cross said construction likely would not begin until early 2007, and that the new stadium - which might cost $1 billion - would not open until the fall of 2010.

Once work on the 700,000-square foot stadium is finished, the teams plan to build a 520,000-square-foot "ancillary component" that would feature "the best of sports, entertainment, retail, sports medicine, health and fitness, and sponsorship and broadcast opportunities."

Retail businesses are expected to occupy at least one-third and perhaps more than half of the supplemental development. The site would be just across Route 120 from the 2.2-million-square-foot Xanadu retail and entertainment project.

The Jets have expressed eagerness to integrate the two massive consumer attractions, perhaps via a retail-laden pedestrian bridge. But Giants Vice President John Mara said those plans have a long way to go.

"The question is, who's going to pay for it, because such a bridge would be extremely expensive," Mara said. "I don't know if it works or not. I'm more concerned about building a stadium right now."

Mara also said he was concerned about how to pay for the new building.

Many NFL teams have gotten as much as $150 million from the league to offset construction costs, and the Jets and Giants hope to receive double that amount as joint builders.

But Mara said it is not clear whether league rivals will grant that wish or even whether the NFL program will continue.

The controversial practice by some NFL teams of issuing Personal Seat Licenses - one-time charges of $500 to $5,000, paid by season-ticket holders for the privilege of maintaining their seats in a new stadium - has yet to be confirmed or rejected by either team.

"We haven't discussed that yet at the team level," Cross said. "But as [acting] Governor Codey pointed out, it's our nickel, and we have to find a lot of money."

The Giants have seemed more reluctant to endorse the use of PSL's, and Mara said it was conceivable that only one team could choose to charge for them.

Giants and Jets officials weren't the only ones who were all smiles Monday.

Codey, an avid sports fan, clearly took great satisfaction in helping broker the new deal during his only year as the state's chief executive.
"We would not be standing here today" without Codey's assistance in negotiations between the teams, Mara said.

That view was shared by nearly all of the principals, who recalled the near-collapse of talks between the two teams in mid-September. The configuration of the new stadium and the number of seats - the Giants sought 80,000 and the Jets wanted 90,000 - were among the thorniest issues.

"We've been delayed far too long already, and it's time for [the Jets] to put up or shut up," an exasperated Mara said two days before a settlement was reached.

On Monday, Johnson recalled Codey's intervention.

"Governor Codey got us into a room and wouldn't let us leave until we signed," Johnson said, exaggerating only slightly.
"Some of us were reluctant at first, but then the logic became very clear."

Codey will be back in his singular role of state Senate president by the time the Jets and Giants submit a final master plan - complete with detailed interior and exterior renderings - in about 90 days.

Codey reiterated his claim that the agreement in which the teams will foot the bill for as much as $1 billion in stadium construction costs means that "New Jersey taxpayers have the best deal in [National Football League] history."

That might be hyperbole, according to sports economists. But it is true that many NFL teams have reached deals in which taxpayers paid one-third to two-thirds of the cost of their new facilities. The state is providing the Jets and Giants with 75 acres of land for the stadium complex, another 20 acres each for practice sites and as much as $30 million in infrastructure improvements.


E-mail: brennan@northjersey.com



Copyright (http://www.northjersey.com/copyright.php) © 2005 North Jersey Media Group Inc. (http://www.njmg.com/)]
(http://www.northjersey.com/registration/privacy.php)

OmegaNYC
December 13th, 2005, 09:33 AM
Will This place have a roof? Maybe this area could get a SuperBowl in a few years. :rolleyes:

ZippyTheChimp
December 13th, 2005, 09:45 AM
http://jets.scout.com/2/477769.html
Only a general site layout has been released. The article states that a master plan willbe released in 2006.

The description of stadium features does not mention a roof.

STT757
December 21st, 2005, 07:34 PM
http://www.nj.com/cgi-bin/prxy/photogalleries/nph-cache.cgi/cache=3000;/njo/images/5716/1.JPG

http://www.nj.com/cgi-bin/prxy/photogalleries/nph-cache.cgi/cache=3000;/njo/images/5716/2.JPG

http://www.nj.com/cgi-bin/prxy/photogalleries/nph-cache.cgi/cache=3000;/njo/images/5716/3.JPG

http://www.nj.com/cgi-bin/prxy/photogalleries/nph-cache.cgi/cache=3000;/njo/images/5716/4.JPG

JCMAN320
December 21st, 2005, 08:30 PM
STT where did you find these renderings?

STT757
December 21st, 2005, 09:21 PM
STT where did you find these renderings?

NJ.com


Star Ledger website, under photos.

STT757
January 20th, 2006, 03:52 PM
Deal for Stadium in New Jersey Gives Teams Reason to Cheer

By CHARLES V. BAGLI
Published: January 20, 2006
In his farewell address last week as governor of New Jersey, Richard J. Codey highlighted his deal to build a new stadium in the Meadowlands and singled out the team owners in the audience: John K. Mara and Steve Tisch of the Giants and Woody Johnson of the Jets.

"We watched a new day rise in the Meadowlands with the Giants and the Jets working together to build a new stadium at no cost to the taxpayers," said Mr. Codey, who has described the deal as a win-win for the football teams and for New Jersey residents.

But as any fan knows, some wins are more lopsided than others. The new, 80,000-seat stadium promises to be a gold mine for the teams, and something less than that for the taxpayers.

The Giants and the Jets expect to make a killing: a combined $183.9 million a year from advertising and premium seats, according to a confidential financial document the teams are circulating among Wall Street bankers interested in financing the project.

That number does not include more than $100 million for each team in annual media revenues; more than $55 million in ticket sales for each team, plus millions more in profit from the halls of fame, restaurants, health clubs and stores they plan to build next to the stadium.

The teams estimate that they could get a total of $17.5 million a year for the stadium's naming rights alone, which would be the most lucrative deal of its kind in professional sports in the United States. The document estimates the teams together could earn an additional $35 million a year in fees from corporate sponsors and advertisers whose logos will adorn the stadium.

The Jets and Giants estimate that the 9,000 planned club seats, up from a mere 125 today, will generate a combined $30.8 million a year, after league revenue sharing. And the 200 or more luxury suites would bring in another $102.8 million, which the teams would share.

With revenues like that, analysts say, the Jets and Giants would vault to the top ranks of professional sports teams.

"Based on these numbers, the Jets and Giants would be among the top three or four most profitable clubs in the National Football League," said Marc Ganis, the president of SportsCorp, a sports business consulting firm.

Officials with the Jets and Giants, who declined to comment, are interviewing prospective lenders this week. The numbers in the financial document are only initial projections for the project, which is to be completed in 2009, but they do provide a rare glimpse inside the world of sports franchise and stadium financing.

The agreement Mr. Codey signed with the Jets and the Giants fixes the rent at a total of $5 million a year for the next 25 years; the teams' payments in lieu of taxes are set at a combined $1.3 million for the next 15 years.

The teams, in turn, got another perk that they do not have now: the ability to develop the property they control, with 520,000 square feet of sports stores, entertainment facilities, health and fitness centers and halls of fame.

One analyst estimated that the teams would each pay about $35 million a year in debt service on the money they borrow to build the stadium. To reduce their costs, each team plans to seek $150 million from the N.F.L.'s stadium building program, according to the documents.

In addition to the $6.3 million in rent and fees that the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority would receive from the teams for the use of 75 acres - they now control 30 acres - the state would receive millions of dollars in sales tax revenue from tickets, merchandise and concessions, and in income taxes from the players for the days they are in the state.

The authority would be stuck with $100 million in debt on the old stadium and would have to pay $30 million for utilities, sewers and other infrastructure for the new stadium.

In addition, although the teams would be playing on publicly owned land, taxpayers would not get a cut of parking, luxury suite or advertising revenues, as they do under the current lease.

In the past, team executives have said the Jets and the Giants are assuming a big risk by agreeing to privately finance a $1 billion stadium, a task no other sports team has taken on. They therefore did not want to give up revenues from parking, luxury boxes or anything else.

The state must also acquire 20 acres in northern New Jersey for a Jets headquarters and training facility.

Carl J. Goldberg, the chairman of the sports authority, has said that the cost of the land will be more than offset by the tax revenues derived from the team's training camp, which would move from Long Island.

The Giants, whose offices are already at the existing stadium, are also getting the free use of 20 acres in the Meadowlands for training fields.

George Zoffinger, the chief executive of the sports authority, was a vociferous critic of what he described as the one-sided nature of the new deal. But he was overruled by Mr. Codey.

"My job is to implement the board's decision, whether I agree with it or not," Mr. Zoffinger said yesterday. "Everybody knows my thoughts on the financial terms."

Mr. Zoffinger and three of the authority's 14 commissioners - Zulima V. Farber, who is the state attorney general designate; Joseph Buckelew; and David Jefferson - voted against the agreement.

But both Mr. Ganis of SportsCorp and Andrew Zimbalist, a sports economist who teaches at Smith College, say that Mr. Codey struck a good deal for the public with the Jets and Giants, by N.F.L. standards.

Cities including San Diego, Atlanta, Cincinnati, Indianapolis and Buffalo used public money to cover 70 percent or more of the cost of new stadiums, while allowing the teams to reap most of the benefits.

In this case, the two observers said, New Jersey will not subsidize either the construction or the maintenance of the stadium.

The new stadium would allow the Giants and the Jets to exploit more fully their presence in the largest and most lucrative market in the country. Experts expect ticket prices to jump and the cost of luxury boxes to set a record.

Indeed, the teams anticipate a naming rights deal that would exceed the current record holder - $10 million a year at Reliant Stadium in Houston-by $7.5 million.

"That would be incredible," said Rob Bressler, editor of "Inside the Ownership of Professional Sports Teams," an annual survey of the business. "It would be the biggest by far."

Can't wait for the development of the Meadowlands.

JCMAN320
February 3rd, 2006, 10:27 AM
Jersey City makes the short list for Jets home office site

Friday, February 03, 2006
By JANET FRANKSTON
ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER

NEWARK - The New York Jets are considering five northern New Jersey sites - including Jersey City - for the team's new corporate headquarters and practice facility, including a former Exxon headquarters in Florham Park.

Also in the running: Wood-Ridge, Berkeley Heights and Millburn.

As part of the deal to jointly build a new stadium at the Meadowlands with the New York Giants, the Jets agreed to move their headquarters to the Garden State from Hofstra University on Long Island.

A final decision, made by the team with the New Jersey Sports & Exposition Authority, is expected by March 1.

The authority plans to either purchase 20 acres or enter into a long-term lease for the site, to include a 110,000-square-foot building and one indoor and three outdoor football fields.

The Jets sought land that would be easy to develop within 20 miles of the Meadowlands and Newark Liberty International Airport, yet accessible to Manhattan and near a range of housing, hotels and medical facilities.

Jets president Jay Cross said the team considered more than 40 properties.

The move from Hempstead is expected to generate more than $10 million each year in new taxes, according to the Jets.

George Zoffinger, president and CEO of the sports authority, said his agency will make sure the site makes the most economic sense for New Jersey.

A law approved last month expanded the sports authority's role to buy or lease land for the training facility away from the East Rutherford sports complex where the Giants will continue to practice on a new 20-acre site.

"I'm happy about the Jets possibly coming here," Jersey City Mayor Jerramiah Healy said in a statement. "Jersey City, with its proximity to New York and all the amenities we can offer, is a great fit for the Jets."

Marissa Shorenstein, a spokeswoman for the Jets, said the team hasn't yet determined if it will also develop land surrounding the practice facility.

JCMAN320
February 14th, 2006, 11:50 AM
JERSEY CITY TO JETS: LAND HERE

Tuesday, February 14, 2006
By KEN THORBOURNE
JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

Jets running back Curtis Martin could soon be practicing his moves in Jersey City, if the plan pitched by city officials for a new headquarters and practice facility is a touchdown with the team.

The New York Jets announced on its Web site earlier this month that the team has narrowed its search for a new practice facility to five places in New Jersey and Jersey City made the cut.

"I think it's an excellent marriage," Jersey City Mayor Jerramiah Healy said. "We have the best location, all of the amenities, and access to New York City."

The team has its eye on a 28-acre area along Caven Point Road, next to the Liberty National Golf Course being built at Port Liberté and adjacent to Cochrane Field.

Nearly 18 of the 28 acres are owned by the Jersey City Board of Education, which purchased the land from the city for roughly $8 million six years ago. The Jets have already begun to negotiate a sale price for a privately-owned warehouse that occupies the other 10 acres on the site, said Carl Czaplicki, the mayor's chief of staff and the city's point person in the negotiations with the Jets.

A ferry ride away from Manhattan, one Turnpike exit from Newark Liberty International Airport - and with Lady Liberty visible in the distance - the location is just what the Jets ordered, city officials said.

"The Jets were impressed with the site's potential," Czaplicki said. "They saw everything would fit."

Jets officials, who said they intend to chose a site by March 1, didn't return phone calls for comment.

Since agreeing to build a new stadium in the Meadowlands with the Giants, Jets officials said they want to open the new training facility in New Jersey by summer 2007. The Jets currently practice at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y.

This facility, they predicted, would generate more than $10 million annually in new tax revenue for the state.

In keeping with requirements laid out by the Jets, a conceptual site plan of the training facility prepared by a city architect calls for four practice fields - three outdoor, one indoor - a three-story, 150,000-square-foot main building with training rooms; seminar space; an auditorium and parking for more than 300 cars.

The land would be officially purchased by the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority and leased to the Jets, Czaplicki said. The authority would pay significantly more than the $300,000 per year in taxes the warehouse pays now, Czaplicki said.

The state approved a new law last month allowing the sports authority to buy property for the new facility.

The Jets are expected to issue a formal request-for-proposal this week, Czaplicki said.

The Jets also want to be good neighbors, city officials stressed.

"They've told us to come up with a wish list, and don't be shy," Czaplicki said.

That list already includes a pool and recreation center for newly-opened Elementary School No. 3 and new turf at the Ferris High School soccer field and the Caven Point field, city Recreation Director Bob Hurley said.

The other cites still in the running: Berkeley Heights, Florham Park, Millburn, and Wood-Ridge.

JCMAN320
March 31st, 2006, 12:37 AM
Jets moving training facilities to Florham Park

The New York Jets will build their new headquarters and training facility on 20 acres at the former Exxon plant in Florham Park, Mayor Frank Tinari confirmed this afternoon.

"On behalf of the citizens of our fine borough I am gratified and excited that Florham Park will become the future home of the New Jets Training Facility,'' Tinari said. "After an exhaustive search process, our community was selected by the Jets and the New Jersey Sports & Exposition Authority. They will not be disappointed by their decision."

George Zoffinger, chief executive of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, said team officials had told him Florham Park was their first choice for a training site.

Tinari said a press conference is scheduled with Gov. Jon Corzine and other state officials as soon as tomorrow to discuss plans for the new $1 billion open-air stadium the Jets and Giants will build in the Meadowlands. A formal annoucement about the Florham Park deal is expected at that time, he said.

The state promised to acquire land for a Jets practice facility as part of a deal between the Jets, Giants and the sports authority to build the new stadium.

The Jets looked at dozens of sites and recently narrowed their choices to property in Wood-Ridge, Jersey City, Short Hills and Cedar Grove as well as the 485-acre former Exxon site Florham Park site.

Team officials have said their top priorities were getting a facility that would be close to the Meadowlands and Newark, and be near a variety of housing for their staff - from $1,500 per month rental apartments to $5 million mansions.

The state expects to pay $10 million to $20 million to acquire the site, but has justified the expense because the state will now be able to collect income taxes from all Jets players and employees, which will add a projected $15 million a year to the state’s coffers.

The Jets now train and maintain facilities at Hofstra University on Long Island.

Contributed by Matt Futterman and Lisa Vernon-Sparks

Marv95
March 31st, 2006, 11:40 AM
If the Jets/Giants are going to play or train in the state of NJ, they should be named after the state of NJ. Otherwise, they should relocate to NY. First the Red Bulls, now this? Good for Florham Park, but this just proves that Jersey just loves to bow down to NY, even after the Jets disrespected their state.

Kris
April 1st, 2006, 04:04 AM
April 1, 2006
New Jersey Reaches New Agreement With Jets and Giants for Stadium
By RICHARD G. JONES

TRENTON, March 31 — After threatening to abandon plans for a new Meadowlands stadium because of its cost, Gov. Jon S. Corzine announced Friday that the state had reached a compromise with the Jets and the Giants that would save New Jersey millions of dollars.

In exchange for revisions in the agreement, however, state officials said they would give the teams additional naming rights at the stadium complex, which could earn the teams millions of dollars more.

New Jersey officials said that two key provisions would help ease the state's financial burden on the project.

The first, officials said, included an agreement that the teams would now pay roughly $35 million in costs associated with upgrading the stadium complex's roadways, sewers and other needs. Those improvements had been the state's responsibility under the earlier deal.

The second provision requires the teams to make larger payments in lieu of taxes to the town of East Rutherford, where the stadium will be situated. The payments must still be negotiated. Under the earlier agreement, the payments were to have been capped at about $1 million dollars a year.

While the old agreement allowed the teams to sell the naming rights to the stadium — which was expected to bring the teams more than $10 million a year — the new deal also allows them to sell naming rights to the racetrack and the planned retail complex adjacent to the stadium. But those naming rights do not extend to the Continental Airlines Arena or Xanadu, the $1.2 billion retail and entertainment complex now under construction in the Meadowlands.

In a statement, Mr. Corzine said that the revised agreement "confirms the partnership that has been fostered between New Jersey and the teams."

The stadium, which officials estimate will cost about $1 billion and will seat 81,000 people, is scheduled to be completed in 2009 and open for the 2010 football season. Besides building the stadium, the teams are also expected to build more than a half million square feet of retail space in the surrounding area.

The owners of the teams, Steve Tisch and John K. Mara of the Giants and Woody Johnson of the Jets, said in statements that they were looking forward to the start of construction and acknowledged the roles of both Mr. Corzine and his predecessor, Richard J. Codey, in drafting the new agreement.

"I think all parties agree that it is time to put shovels in the ground," said Mr. Codey, who had negotiated the original agreement with the teams last fall.

The state and the teams began to renegotiate the agreement early last month after Mr. Corzine questioned the cost of the project to taxpayers and suggested that he would like to see the stadium fitted with a retractable roof. Adding a roof would allow the stadium to hold lucrative events year round, including the Super Bowl, and bring in more tax dollars to the state.

But the owners of the teams — who are privately financing the project — have made public remarks in recent weeks suggesting that they would forsake the new stadium completely rather than add a costly roof, which could have increased the price by as much as a half-billion dollars.

Although the revised agreement does not include a provision for a roof — or an increase in the teams' annual $5 million rent — one analyst said that changes to the new agreement, however modest, were beneficial to New Jersey taxpayers.

"In a fairer world, the deal would have been sweeter for New Jersey," said Andrew Zimbalist, a sports economist who teaches at Smith College. "But you've got to give Corzine credit for the way he stuck his neck out and said, 'Hey, wait a minute, I know a deal has been negotiated, but we need to look at this.'"

Mr. Zimbalist added, "One can imagine a more equitable agreement, but I think this is a pretty O.K. outcome."

East Rutherford's mayor, James L. Cassella, of said he was waiting for a legal review of the agreement.

Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company

Transic
July 10th, 2006, 04:01 AM
http://www.nj.com/news/ledger/index.ssf?/base/news-7/1152508336288330.xml&coll=1

Meadows stadium plans still changing

Monday, July 10, 2006

BY MATTHEW FUTTERMAN
Star-Ledger Staff

Three days before state officials begin their first serious review of plans for the new football stadium in the Meadowlands, specific details for the size and scope of the stadium remain in flux, according to Giants chief executive John Mara.

The Giants and Jets, who are building the stadium together at the Meadowlands Sports Complex, last week submitted plans for the new building to state officials in preparation for a series of hearings Wednesday in front of the New Jersey Meadowlands Commission. The commission controls development in the Meadowlands region.

The plans call for an 82,500-seat stadium with roughly 200 luxury suites and 9,000 to 9,500 club seats.

However, Mara said the numbers for a stadium expected to cost more than $1 billion were not yet firm.

"Those numbers can fluctuate up or down depending on a variety of things," Mara said last night. "I would not put too much stock in them."

In the past, the teams have said the stadium would have 80,000 to 90,000 seats with as many as 10,000 club seats, which carry higher- priced tickets and include access to a club and special dining facilities. The number of planned luxury suites has not changed.

State officials will review the impact that the stadium, which should be ready for the 2010 season, and a planned commercial development of 520,000 square feet will have on local traffic and the surrounding transportation system.

George Zoffinger, chief executive of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, said the teams need to be sensitive to the stadium's height.

"It's in the flight path of the Teterboro airport landing pattern, and that was an issue with Xanadu," Zoffinger said, referring to the retail and entertainment center now under construction at the sports complex.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.recordonline.com/archive/2006/07/10/sports-newstadium-07-10.html

N.J. stadium bigger, costlier
Giants/Jets venue to seat additional 2,500 fans

The Associated Press

East Rutherford, N.J. - The new football stadium that will be home to the Giants and Jets will be slightly bigger than expected, with new plans showing room for 2,500 more seats.

The cost to build the stadium is expected to increase to between $1.1 billion and $1.2 billion, mostly due to rising construction costs. An earlier price tag had been $1 billion.

And the naming rights to the new stadium, expected to open for the 2010 season, are still open to the highest bidder.

Those details were all part of an updated master plan submitted by the teams to the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority about the stadium that is being jointly financed by the two NFL teams.

The stadium would have 82,500 seats, adding another 1,500 club seats and 1,000 more general admission seats. The updated plans didn't specify the location of the seats or outline the cost per ticket.

The stadium would also be about 20 feet taller than initially planned.

The stadium plan will be reviewed by sports authority's staff and would need to be approved by the authority board. The state Department of Environmental Protection and the Meadowlands Commission will also review the plan.

The commission will hold three sessions on Wednesday during which the public will have the chance to comment on the environmental impact of the project, notably traffic and air quality, said Barbara Lampen, a senior vice president for planning and development with the sports authority. She said the commission's review is expected to take about nine months.

Representatives from both the teams and the sports authority will give presentations at the hearing, Lampen said.

In addition to the stadium, plans also call for 520,000 square feet of ancillary development, which may include broadcasting facilities, sports medicine, health and fitness facilities, retail and restaurants.

The 55-acre stadium complex is being conceived for use 365 days a year, with a possible hall of fame, team store stores, themed dining, areas for conferences and club lounges.

The architecture is designed to elicit a town-center feel, with sidewalks and pedestrian access.

Carl Goldberg, chairman of the sports authority, said he expects the final agreement between the teams and the state to be signed this summer.

The Giants are also building a 20-acre practice site near the new stadium. The Jets are building new practice facilities and corporate headquarters on 20 acres in Florham Park. The team is expected to move from Hempstead, N.Y., in the summer of 2008.

OmegaNYC
July 10th, 2006, 06:49 PM
damn, if it only had a dome...... Though this stadium is exspensive as heck.

STT757
July 10th, 2006, 09:09 PM
Even if the State has to pay for that part they need to put a retractable roof on the new stadium, that way it can host the Superbowl, NCAA Final Four etc.

The Giants and Jets are reluctant to have a roof even one that is retractable because of NFL rules, the NFL rules state that if there's a roof it must be closed during bad weather. The Giants and Jets feel the Northeast weather in November and December gives them an advantage over teams like St.Louis Rams who play indoors or the Miami Dolphins who seem to be unable to win a big game in cold weather.

If the NFL would defer the Judgements of when to close the roof to the teams then the Giants and Jets would be for the roof, although I don't think they would be willing to pay for the roof.

STT757
July 11th, 2006, 10:07 PM
Here's the design of the new rail station:

http://newyork.construction.com/images/2006/June_InfraNews.jpg

http://www.dmrarchitects.com/images/Meadowlands2.jpg

http://www.dmrarchitects.com/images/Meadowlands1.jpg

http://www.dmrarchitects.com/portfolio_municipal_meadowlands.htm

http://www.njsea.com/railroad/pdf/PEIS%20Chapter%201%20Project%20Description.pdf

pianoman11686
July 11th, 2006, 10:19 PM
Looks more like a terminal at a regional airport. Not bad, though.

JCMAN320
July 12th, 2006, 01:30 AM
That's whats up, now if only the Nets can wind up staying there, then I will be really happy.

OmegaNYC
July 19th, 2006, 02:41 AM
Well JCMAN, this is going to hurt:



State Approves Ratner Plans for Arena, Expected to be Ready in 2009
In a major victory for Bruce Ratner, the Empire State Development Corporation Tuesday approved with few reservations the Nets owner's plan for the $3.5 billion Atlantic Yards project, including the team's new arena, in downtown Brooklyn. In its approval, the ESDC said "the proposed project is expected to achieve long-term State and City goals" and added "the arena is expected to be open in time for the 2009 NBA season".

STT757
September 9th, 2006, 12:40 PM
Jets, Giants execs retreat to dissect stadium deal

Saturday, September 09, 2006
BY MATTHEW FUTTERMAN
Star-Ledger Staff

After a summer of stalled progress on their planned stadium in the Meadowlands, Jets and Giants executives took a retreat this week to focus on every major question about the $1 billion project.

Team executives skipped the usual retreat leisure activities, and at the end of two days at a General Electric corporate facility in Ossining, N.Y., the teams came away with agreements on some of the basic features of their stadium.

Jets chief executive Jay Cross and Giants co-owner John Mara said the stadium will have between 80,000 and 81,000 seats, 200 luxury suites and slightly more than 9,000 premium club seats.

"We're making the decisions we have to make to stay on our schedule," Mara said yesterday.

The teams want to open the stadium for the 2010 season. They plan to have final drawings and to select a contractor by the end of the year and break ground next spring. So far two contractors are bidding for the job.

Cross said the teams needed to get away from their usual places of work to focus on the project before the business of the season got under way.

"We dealt with every aspect, from the marketing, to the financing, to the design of the place," Cross said. "We're getting some of the big decisions put to bed."

The teams have yet to decide on the design of the building's exterior but have hired designers David Rockwell and Bruce Mau to come up with the right look for the building.

Cross said the teams are in the process of setting up a procedure for marketing advertising and luxury suite sales for the building. Some of the signs are expected to be permanent at the new building, but many will be electronic so each team can have its own inventory of advertisers.

"It's a complicated process," Cross said. "We're working through it."

Lets get construction started!

JCMAN320
December 7th, 2006, 09:59 AM
Giants, Jets: Tackle NFL owners today for funding

Thursday, December 07, 2006
BY MATTHEW FUTTERMAN
Star-Ledger Staff

Owners of the Giants and Jets are in Dallas today with one mission: to convince 30 other National Football League owners, there for the NFL meetings, to kick in a crucial $300 million the two teams say they need to build their shared stadium in the Meadowlands.

The owners are expected to vote on the proposal, and if the necessary three-quarters approval is not obtained, the teams will have to decide whether they can still afford to build the stadium.

The quest for the NFL money, known as "G-3 financing," has unified the rival ownership groups of late as they continue to work through their uneasy partnership.

In recent months, owners of the two teams have had disputes large and small, substantial and petty, involving everything from money, to operations at the current stadium, to plans for the new building and its surrounding development, according to four people involved with the project. The discussions include:

An argument over the massive Jets banner that hangs outside the current stadium when the Jets have a home game. Last month the Jets had home games on consecutive weekends, so Jets chief executive Jay Cross asked Giants management if the team could leave the banner up rather than spend the $10,000 to take it down and rehang it six days later. The Giants told the Jets to abide by their current agreement and take the banner down.

A dispute over a $15 million payment the Giants are scheduled to receive from developers of the Xanadu project in exchange for the team's permission for Xanadu to go forward. The Giants cut the deal with Xanadu's developers last year, while the Jets were still pursuing a Manhattan stadium. Once the Jets became partners with the Giants, they requested sharing the payment. The Giants turned them down.

Continuing differences in how to pursue the planned retail development that will surround the shared stadium, or whether to press for their retail development to be open on Sunday game days despite blue laws in Bergen County that prohibit most retail activity on Sundays. The stadium has been exempt from those laws for 30 years, but it is unclear how much of the teams' development around the new stadium would be exempt.

Alice McGillion, a spokeswoman for the Jets-Giants partnership, declined to discuss any recent discussions between the teams or their attempt to get the financial support from the NFL that Giants co-owner John Mara has said the project cannot be built without.

Carl Goldberg, chairman of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, said any rifts between the teams would not stand in the way of their coming up with the money for the 81,000-seat stadium scheduled to open in 2010.

"I have complete confidence they will put together a financing package to build this project as contemplated," Goldberg said.

Marc Ganis, a financial consultant to several NFL owners, said the Jets and Giants have likely benefited from having to band together to get the money from the NFL.

"Any time you pursue something that is a shared goal, you find that you have a lot more in common with a partner," Ganis said.

Securing the NFL's portion of the stadium financing has required all the persuasive powers the teams and commissioner Roger Goodell have.

Under the G-3 financing program, NFL owners give up the visiting team's one-third share of their opponents' club seat sales, which are usually the most expensive seats in the stadium. The money is then used to pay back the NFL's contribution to construction or renovation costs. Because the Jets and Giants will share the stadium, the teams have each requested the maximum $150 million, or a total of $300 million, in league financing for the project.

Some owners have objected to financing the new stadium because, according to the compensation rules of the new Collective Bargaining Agreement with the NFL Players Association, all the revenue from the lucrative new stadium will dramatically drive up the amount of money the teams have to pay the players. So while only the Jets and the Giants will gain substantially from the new building, 30 other teams will have to deal with the results of its success.

Goodell has spent the past two months working out a deal with NFLPA executive director Gene Upshaw that would limit the salary increase resulting from the new stadium to about $2 million for each team. Whether that is enough to make the G-3 loan more palatable to owners of small-market teams, such as Buffalo, or Kansas City or Tennessee, remains to be seen.

"The commissioner wants to get this into a position to make this work," said NFL spokesman Greg Aiello. "But everybody is going to have to step up and do their part."

Ganis said NFL owners have moved beyond the acrimony surrounding last year's debate over revenue sharing but are still debating the future of stadium financing.

"There are answers to questions that are being asked that are tough," he said. "The concessions from the players association may not be enough."

Matthew Futterman may be reached at mfutterman@starledger.com

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December 7th, 2006, 01:52 PM
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601079&sid=a_.Zjg2wrBFY&refer=home

Giants, Jets Receive $300 Million in NFL Stadium Loan (Update1)

By Aaron Kuriloff

Dec. 7 (Bloomberg) -- The New York Giants and Jets received approval for $300 million in National Football League loans toward a shared $1.2 billion stadium in the New Jersey Meadowlands.

Representatives of the league's teams, meeting in Dallas, voted 30-2 to grant each New York franchise $150 million through a program that provides financing for stadium construction, Giants co-owner Steve Tisch said in an interview. No other single project has received more than $150 million since the NFL's program began in 1999.

"With no other obstacles, we're in good position to break ground in the spring,'' Tisch said.

The Jets-Giants request risked being the first that the owners rejected. Some owners were concerned that increased revenue from the new stadium, once added to the players' salary pool, would boost payrolls for all teams. Owners of both teams said the privately financed stadium was contingent on the $300 million NFL contribution.

The NFL players union said this week it was willing to cut the salary ceiling by $800 million over 15 years to reduce the stadium's impact on other teams. It said a new facility would raise salaries by around $2 million a year.

With financing secure, the next step for the stadium project is an environmental-impact hearing Dec. 13-14 before two New Jersey state commissions.

Share Stadium

The Giants and Jets said they should get twice the usual loan because they are the only NFL teams sharing a facility. They agreed to split the costs of replacing 30-year-old Giants Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey, after the Jets were unable to get public funding for a stadium on Manhattan's West Side.

The teams' plans call for building an 84,000-seat stadium next door to Giants Stadium, with a footprint of about 630,000 square feet, according to a document submitted to the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and the Meadowlands Commission, which will hold the hearings next week.

The Giants plan to build a 20-acre training facility in the southwest corner of the development, along with parking areas and tailgating zones. Broadcast facilities, sports medicine clinics, stores, restaurants and a New Jersey Transit rail spur also are part of the project.

Playing in the U.S.'s largest market, the Giants had annual revenue of $182 million, according to a 2006 listing by Forbes magazine, while the Jets had about $179 million. The Washington Redskins led the league, with $303 million.

Revenue

A new stadium might help both New York teams generate more money from skyboxes, luxury seating, parking, concessions and naming rights, even after borrowing for construction, said Craig Depken, who teaches sports economics at the University of Texas, Arlington.

Depken said the average NFL team gains about $20 million in profit annually from a new stadium.

"I imagine at current rates, the debt will be something like $20-25 million a year, so they'll need to get more than the $20 million league average,'' Depken said. "I have no doubt they'll get it.''

The teams may make more money, and help pay for the stadium, by selling seat licenses, a one-time fee for a transferable permit to buy tickets, said Max Muhleman, president of Private Sports Consultants in Charlotte, North Carolina, who has worked on stadium projects for the Carolina Panthers and other NFL teams.

"They receive ownership or equity in their seats that can be transferred or sold if they wish,'' Muhleman said. "This is not a front-burner need, but it could contribute a significant amount of capital, around $90 or $100 million.''

Revenue Restrictions

Other teams don't share in local revenue that new stadiums generate, such as money from luxury seats, skyboxes, parking and naming rights. Because the NFL's labor agreement calculates the salary ceiling as a percentage of total league revenue, the new stadium also will raise player salaries for all teams.

Ralph Wilson, owner of the Buffalo Bills, was one of two owners to vote against the labor agreement in March 2006. U.S. Senator Charles E. Schumer, a New York Democrat, joined Wilson in an Oct. 10 news conference saying the agreement threatened the NFL's competitive balance because it left teams such as Buffalo with income pegged to the local economy and expenses dictated by teams in bigger markets such as New York City, Washington or Dallas.

Gene Upshaw, president of the National Football League Player's Association, said this week that the union would accept an $800 million cut over 15 years in the salary limit -- $102 million per team this season -- in order to alleviate concerns about labor costs to other teams.

Cowboys owner Jerry Jones also said in an interview in October that owners were working to mitigate revenue differences and called giving the Giants and Jets $300 million a "reasonable approach.''

"I think we are working and have worked with the player's association to mitigate that revenue so it can take steps to clear the way for a new stadium,'' Jones said.

To contact the reporter in this story: Aaron Kuriloff in New York at akuriloff@bloomberg.net (akuriloff@bloomberg.net)

Last Updated: December 7, 2006 12:21 EST

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December 15th, 2006, 08:29 AM
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/sports/16232421.htm

Giants Jets stadium moving through state approval process

JANET FRANKSTON LORIN

Associated Press

LYNDHURST, N.J. - Concerns about traffic and environmental issues predominated as state agencies took public comment Wednesday about the proposed new football stadium at the Meadowlands.

The state Department of Environmental Protection and the Meadowlands Commission are reviewing plans for the new home of the New York Giants and New York Jets at the Meadowlands sports complex.

The teams are jointly financing the stadium, expected to cost between $1.1 billion and $1.2 billion and seat between 82,500 and 84,000. The teams expect to present final design plans in January.

Bill Sheehan, the Hackensack Riverkeeper, asked about use of paper products instead of Styrofoam, the effect of stadium lighting on wildlife and how building materials could be recycled.

Mary Musca, a project executive for the stadium, said when the old stadium is demolished material will be recycled and crushed to fill the hole in the ground that is formed by the demolition.

She mentioned other environmentally friendly features of the stadium, including waterless urinals, low-water usage plants and landscaping, synthetic turf on the field and energy-efficient lighting.

Damien Newton, New Jersey coordinator for the Tri-State Transportation Campaign, said planners have failed to adequately address traffic issues, specifically the possibility of a "perfect storm" of rush hour commuters, patrons of the nearby Xanadu entertainment and shopping complex, an event at the stadium and an event at the Meadowlands Racetrack.

Musca said the teams have learned a lot from studying traffic patterns and plan to offer 27,500 parking spaces that will be better managed to avoid the bottlenecks fans experience after games. The teams will add features like prepaid parking, a new inner loop road system and replacement of toll booths.

The agencies expect a final environmental impact study in February and their approval could come in March. Musca said groundbreaking is expected in June 2007 with completion in time for the 2010 season.

Ancillary development would be built after the old stadium is demolished and only when market conditions are ready, she said.

Carl Goldberg, chairman of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, said negotiations over the teams' lease have concluded and the NJSEA board could authorize him to sign it as early as its meeting next week.
More public hearings are scheduled for Thursday.
__
On the Net: http://www.meadowlands.state.nj.us/ (http://www.meadowlands.state.nj.us/)

Transic
December 20th, 2006, 10:37 PM
http://www.newsday.com/news/local/wire/newjersey/ny-bc-nj--giantsjetsstadium1220dec20,0,318647.story?coll=ny-region-apnewjersey

NJ sports authority, football teams to sign lease for stadium

December 20, 2006, 4:51 PM EST

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- One of the final major negotiating hurdles for a new football stadium at the Meadowlands has been cleared.

The board of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority voted Wednesday to allow its chairman, Carl Goldberg, to sign a ground lease with the New York Giants and New York Jets for the proposed stadium, projected to cost more than $1 billion and open in 2010.

"Certainly this is the primary legal document that binds the Sports Authority to the franchises for the construction of the stadium," Goldberg said. He said he would likely sign the lease Thursday.

The authority, which owns the land at the Meadowlands, will enter into a 39-year lease with the teams for $5 million annually, Goldberg said.

After the 15th year of the initial lease, and after giving 12 months' notice, either team would have an option to leave the stadium every five years. But if one team exercises the option, the other is obligated to stay for the remainder of the initial lease.

The teams would have four options to extend the lease in increments of 14 years. The teams could occupy the stadium for 97 years if all options are exercised.

In a statement, the teams said the approval represents the culmination of more than two years of work with the sports authority, Gov. Jon S. Corzine, Senate President Richard Codey and other state officials.

"We are very proud to be a part of this exciting revitalization of the Meadowlands Sports Complex that guarantees that the Meadowlands will remain home to NFL football for decades to come," said Alice McGillion, a spokeswoman for New Meadowlands Stadium Corp., a company that represents the team owners.

The board must still approve the final master plan for the stadium, and it is undergoing environmental reviews with the state and Meadowlands Commission.

Earlier this month, NFL owners approved $300 million in loans to help finance the new stadium.

Transic
December 21st, 2006, 04:36 AM
http://www.nj.com/sports/ledger/index.ssf?/base/sports-0/1166680667100530.xml&coll=1

Vote allows Giants, Jets to lease land

Thursday, December 21, 2006

BY MATTHEW FUTTERMAN
Star-Ledger Staff

The planned stadium for the Jets and the Giants cleared one of its final hurdles yesterday when the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority approved the official lease of the land where the building will rise.

The 14-2 vote essentially clears the way for the teams to move ahead with their plans to break ground on the stadium by the end of June. All that remains is for the team to secure financing for the $1.2 billion stadium and for the plans to pass the New Jersey Meadowlands Commission's environmental review of the project.

"This is a historic vote to build a world-class facility," said Carl Goldberg, chairman of the sports authority, the state agency that controls the Meadowlands Sports Complex. "I plan to execute the agreement tomorrow."

In a joint statement, the Giants and Jets celebrated a vote the teams have been working toward for more than two years.

"The approval of this agreement represents the culmination of more than two years of hard work by us together with the NJSEA, Gov. Jon Corzine, Senate President Richard Codey and other State officials to make this project possible. We are very proud to be a part of this exciting revitalization of the Meadowlands Sports Complex that guarantees that the Meadowlands will remain home to NFL football for decades to come."

The stadium is scheduled to open before the 2010 season. The 14-2 vote did not come without dissent, including a heated 90-minute closed session during which the state agency's commissioners debated whether they had given too much away during more than a year of negotiations with the two football teams.

"In the long run, this is not the best deal we could have gotten," said Anthony Scardino, a former state senator and one of the dissenting commissioners.

Last year the Giants and Jets agreed to lease 75 acres at the sports complex for the next 25 years for $5 million a year, plus an annual property tax payment of $1.3 million each year. The teams will build the football stadium, a training facility for the Giants and a retail and restaurant complex on the property.

However, Scardino criticized the final lease approved yesterday for giving the Giants and Jets control of the parking revenues on the western half of the sports complex, including racetrack parking, even on days when games are not taking place.

In addition, Scardino said the rent on the land should not remain stable for the next 25 years, as it does in the agreement. Also, the sports authority is responsible for any property tax payments on the stadium that exceed $1.3 million. The agency and the town of East Rutherford, where the sports complex is located, have yet to work out a deal for the stadium's annual tax bill.

"All this time we have been giving and giving and I can't see what we got back," Scardino said.

Goldberg said the negotiations were hardly a one-way street and the sports authority will be reimbursed for parking fees that it currently gets.

"As with any sophisticated, complex real estate transaction, there is going to be a healthy discussion," he said. "I'm pleased with what we've accomplished and I'm comfortable with the discussion that took place this morning."

Matthew Futterman can be reached at (973) 392-1732 or mfutterman@starledger.com

Transic
January 7th, 2007, 04:14 AM
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/07/sports/football/07owners.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1

Stadium Deal Has Created Unlikely Team in Giants and Jets

By BILL PENNINGTON (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/p/bill_pennington/index.html?inline=nyt-per)
Published: January 7, 2007

In 1965, the Giants (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/sports/profootball/nationalfootballleague/newyorkgiants/index.html?inline=nyt-org) had the first pick of the National Football League draft. With it, they selected Tucker Frederickson, a blond, square-jawed and decorous running back from Auburn University (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/a/auburn_university/index.html?inline=nyt-org) in Alabama, an all-American in every way.

That same day, the rival American Football League conducted its draft, and with their first pick the Jets (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/sports/profootball/nationalfootballleague/newyorkjets/index.html?inline=nyt-org) turned to the University of Alabama (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/u/university_of_alabama/index.html?inline=nyt-org) and chose Joe Namath, a dark-haired rogue with a world of talent, a dossier of demerits and an impish grin.

Today, the Giants and the Jets take the field for playoff games on the same day, another chapter in their more than 40-year symbiotic relationship as contemporaries in the world’s biggest sports marketplace.

They are two very different sports franchises, led by men, on the field and in the owners’ boxes, with contrasting management styles. They are entities with distinct cultures — the Giants more entrenched and the Jets more flamboyant. Generally, they are followed by fan bases dissimilar in nature.

Yet they are habitually linked and should be for generations to come. While the Giants and the Jets have shared a publicly owned stadium since 1984, they are in the final stages of completing the plans to privately finance a $1.3 billion joint stadium in the Meadowlands Sports Complex that would open in 2010. The once bitter rivals of the 1960s and 1970s are close business partners, even as they approach that collaboration from disparate vantage points.

The Giants co-owner John Mara, who remembers when a 1969 Giants-Jets preseason game brought scores of fistfights in the stands and vicious hitting on the field, said the earliest talks about the new stadium also resulted in tense, heated meetings between the teams.

“But we’ve worked it out,” Mara said. “The relationship is better than it ever has been.”

The Jets’ owner, Woody Johnson, agreed, though he conceded that the teams remained unswerving competitors.

“You have a battle for the hearts and minds of the people in the community,” Johnson said Friday in a telephone interview. “That’s a natural rivalry and that’s what the fans want. It is the natural state of two businesses in the same town. But we’ve come together for the new stadium.”

The manifest differences between the franchises, however, do not seem to have been obscured by the unprecedented agreement to construct one stadium for two N.F.L. teams.

“Their ambitions may have merged to build a stadium, but their identities are going to continue to diverge more and more,” said Marc Ganis, a sports industry consultant based in Chicago who advises N.F.L. teams. “It is part of their makeup to be at odds. The Giants are more traditional and the Jets more futuristic. Look at their recent coaching choices. The Jets were comfortable hiring a 34-year-old with no head-coaching experience in Eric Mangini. With Tom Coughlin (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/c/tom_coughlin/index.html?inline=nyt-per), the Giants went for the older, experienced coach who was known as a disciplinarian.

“It does not mean one is going to be more successful on or off the field. But it is a reflection of their disparities.”

Giants and Jets officials responded to such an appraisal, not surprisingly, with differing opinions.

“Our history is rooted in 1969, Namath and the Super Bowl,” said Jay Cross, the Jets’ president. “We’re a young, scrappy Broadway team that wants to be seen as an energetic, youthful and progressive franchise. We don’t do that in contrast to someone else.”

Cross added, “We recognize the Giants are the senior team.”

Mara, whose grandfather bought the Giants for $500 in 1925, disagreed with the perception that his team’s philosophy was staid or dated.

“We are certainly traditional,” Mara said, “but building a $1.3 billion stadium is not the mark of a staid or conservative organization. The 2004 trade for Eli Manning (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/m/eli_manning/index.html?inline=nyt-per) is hardly the mark of an organization that is stodgy or not willing to take a risk. We have been, for better or worse, one of the most aggressive teams in the free-agent market. We have done some pretty bold things.

“Yes, we’re not going to have vertical stripes on our uniforms, have cheerleaders on the field or be selling a lingerie calendar on our Web site like some teams, but there are other ways to be bold and aggressive.”

New Jersey officials involved in the stadium talks in the past two years said they saw clear differences in the approaches of Giants and Jets management.

For starters, since the Giants had opened talks with the state and designed a new Meadowlands stadium as the Jets were busy with their failed five-year struggle to put a stadium on Manhattan’s West Side, the Jets’ entry into the New Jersey negotiations in mid-2005 was not smooth.

The Giants were not receptive to Jets proposals that the new New Jersey stadium be made more neutral for each team. The biggest sticking point was the inclusion of Giants offices and practice fields attached to the stadium.

Paul Fader, the lawyer who helped negotiate the stadium deal for Richard J. Codey, then the acting governor, said: “The Giants said: ‘We never tried to leave; we’re the ones who committed to stay here. Why should we have to make any concessions?’ There were some tough sessions. It was edgy. Nothing unprofessional was said, but the conversation was pointed.”

The Jets stood their ground. On Friday, Johnson said, “The stadium had to look and feel neutral.”

The Jets, feeling like second-class citizens at Giants Stadium for the past 22 years, knew the negative impact a large Giants practice facility would have on Jets fans. Eventually, the Giants agreed to move their practice facilities to a remote location in the sports complex. The Jets will practice and have their offices several miles away in Florham Park, N.J.

“You saw many other differences in how the Giants and Jets went about things,” said George R. Zoffinger, the chief executive of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/n/new_jersey_sports_and_exposition_authority/index.html?inline=nyt-org), which oversees the Meadowlands complex. “The Giants truly cared about the football aspects of the stadium. The Jets had a broader view of where they could make money off the ancillary uses of the facility. They had the ideas for retail, real estate, signage, sponsorships.”

Carl Goldberg, chairman of the sports authority, said: “The Jets came to the table with a lot of work already done on the technology of how to make the most of a flexible modern stadium. At the same time, there had to be room for appreciating what the Giants meant to the history of this facility. Giants Stadium would not exist for either team these last few decades without Wellington Mara.”

Wellington Mara, John’s father, was among the first sports franchise owners to relocate his team to a suburb when his Giants moved from Yankee Stadium in 1973 and settled in northern New Jersey in 1976.

Fader said he sometimes felt the Giants-Jets meetings unfolded along stereotypical lines.

“People say the typical Giants fan wears plain pants and comes from Connecticut,” said Fader, who called himself a Giants fan. “The typical Jets fan comes from Long Island and wears a T-shirt. Well, the Giants came to meetings in suits and were more staid. I felt the Jets had a younger presence and were a little more informal. There were very different styles.

“The Jets, for example, initially wanted a 90,000-seat stadium. That’s a big, raucous place. The Giants said the extra 10,000 seats would make the stadium too high and that the extra 10,000 seats would be too far from the field and not be a good seat anyway. Both were thinking of their fans, just differently.”

The new stadium is expected to have 68,000 general admission seats, 9,000 premium seats, 200 luxury suites for 5,000 fans, as well as 100,000 square feet of conference space, a football Hall of Fame, football-themed restaurants and 40,000 square feet for Giants and Jets team stores. An additional 500,000 square feet of retail, restaurant and broadcast facilities is planned, along with several tailgate zones.

The new stadium will accomplish something else for the old New York football rivals: it may make them the most valuable franchises in the United States.

“Both teams will easily be worth more than $1.2 billion,” said Mike Ozanian, a senior editor at Forbes magazine, which estimated the Giants’ current worth at $890 million and the Jets’ at $876 million. “That could put the Giants and Jets atop the N.F.L. What they’ll be able to get for corporate sponsorships at that new stadium will blow people away.”

Little wonder the relationship between the Giants and the Jets is more amiable than ever.

When the Giants play today at Philadelphia and the Jets visit New England, it will be only the second time the Giants and the Jets have played on the same day in the N.F.L. postseason. In late December 1981, the Giants upset the Eagles (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/sports/profootball/nationalfootballleague/philadelphiaeagles/index.html?inline=nyt-org) in Philadelphia, 27-21. The Jets lost to Buffalo, 31-27, at home in Shea Stadium.

Neither Mara nor Johnson said he would be rooting for his neighborhood rival today. They did not say they were rooting against the other, either. They had a telephone conversation Friday during which they exchanged good-luck wishes.

The teams are scheduled to play each other next season. It is clear that remnants of the competitive tensions of the 1960s have not entirely dissipated.

“Now, next season, if both teams are playing well,” Mara said, “that will be a big game.”

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January 26th, 2007, 11:07 AM
http://www.usatoday.com/money/companies/2007-01-26-meadowlands-stadium_x.htm?POE=SPOISVA

Swedish company gets $998M contract to build new stadium for NFL Giants and Jets
Updated 1/26/2007 9:36 AM ET

By Janet Frankston Lorin, Associated Press

NEWARK — The price of the new football stadium for the New York Giants and New York Jets has risen to $1.4 billion.

The teams, which are jointly financing the stadium, awarded the biggest single contract to a Swedish construction company Friday.

Skanska AB says that it has received a $998 million order to design and build the open-air stadium at the Meadowlands sports complex in East Rutherford, N.J.

"It shows the continued momentum and we are on the timeline that we need to be for a 2010 opening," said Alice McGillion, a spokeswoman for New Meadowlands Stadium Corp., the company representing the team owners.

The stadium will seat 82,000 people and include 217 luxury suite boxes, Skanska spokesman Peter Gimbe said.

McGillion said the number of seats could change, depending on the final design.

Skanska said the contract with the Meadowlands NFL Football Stadium LLC is its largest U.S. contract yet.

McGillion said the teams expect to unveil exterior plans for the stadium in late February or early March, with a groundbreaking in late spring or early summer.

In December, the teams got a big boost from owners of the National Football League, who approved a $300 million loan to help pay for the stadium.

The project is also going through the approval process with the state of New Jersey.

The state Department of Environmental Protection and the Meadowlands Commission expect a final environmental impact study of the project in February; their approval could come in March.

Transic
January 27th, 2007, 01:35 AM
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/27/nyregion/27stadium.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

Costs Increase for Building N.F.L. Stadium

By KEN BELSON (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/b/ken_belson/index.html?inline=nyt-per)
Published: January 27, 2007

Nothing seems to come cheap these days, particularly new athletic stadiums.

The cost of the football stadium to be built in the Meadowlands for the Giants (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/sports/profootball/nationalfootballleague/newyorkgiants/index.html?inline=nyt-org) and the Jets (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/sports/profootball/nationalfootballleague/newyorkjets/index.html?inline=nyt-org) is expected to reach $1.4 billion, about $100 million more than previous estimates, and about 75 percent more than the $800 million first projected in 2005 when the Giants were the only team involved.

Alice McGillion, a spokeswoman for the New Meadowlands Stadium Corporation, which represents the teams’ owners, said yesterday that increases in the costs of materials and other construction were the reason for the higher price tag.

“It’s just the cost of building and estimates go up as you get closer to building,” Ms. McGillion said, noting that the 82,000-seat stadium was being privately financed.

Sports industry experts said cost estimates typically rise because the prices of materials increase as construction progresses.

“These projects just don’t become cheaper,” said David Carter, a professor of sports business at the University of Southern California (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/u/university_of_southern_california/index.html?inline=nyt-org). “When you’re trying to put together the gold-standard stadium, it’s no surprise the price goes up.”

In December, the National Football League said it would lend $300 million to the Giants and the Jets to finance the construction of the stadium in the Sports Complex in East Rutherford, N.J. The teams will use money from the sale of club seats to repay the 15-year loan.

Groundbreaking for the open-air stadium is expected this spring or summer, and the stadium is expected to open in time for the 2010 season.

The teams have said they would pay $35 million to upgrade the roads and other infrastructure around the stadium in return for being able to sell the naming rights, which could be very valuable, and keep the proceeds. Last week, the British bank Barclays agreed to pay nearly $400 million over 20 years to have its name on a new basketball arena in Brooklyn planned for the New Jersey Nets (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/sports/probasketball/nationalbasketballassociation/newjerseynets/index.html?inline=nyt-org), who would be leaving the Meadowlands.

The Giants and the Jets also said yesterday that they had chosen the American subsidiary of Skanska AB, a Swedish company, to design and build the stadium. The contract is worth nearly $1 billion.

__________________________________________________ ___

http://www.cpnonline.com/cpn/regions/article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1003538331

Skanska Wins Giant-Size Contract to Build N.J. Stadium
January 26, 2007
By Paul Rosta, Senior Associate Editor

When the original Giants Stadium opened in the East Rutherford, N.J., 30 years ago, construction costs totaled $78 million. In a sure sign that times have changed, the time the New York Giants and their co-tenants, the New York Jets, take up residence in the stadium in 2010, the project will reportedly set the teams back more than $1 billion.

That sign of the times comes on the heels of today’s disclosure that U.S. affiliates of the Swedish construction firm Skanska have won a design-build contract valued at $998 million for the project, which will take shape adjacent to the existing Giants Stadium in the New Jersey Meadowlands sports and entertainment complex. Skanska USA Building Inc. will serve as the design-build contractor, and another affiliate, Skanska USA Civil, will handle the steel works with a $150 million contract. All told, stadium costs will hit $1.4 billion, according to an Associated Press report.

The project is one of several at the site that will likely provide an additional boost to the several property types in the local market, said David Stifelman (pictured), a senior director with Cushman & Wakefield of New Jersey Inc. “It’s always been great for hospitality. I think it will only get better,” Stifelman told CPN this morning. He noted that local hotels already enjoy strong occupancy.

Also taking shape in the same sports complex is Meadowlands Xanadu, the often troubled sports and entertainment project originally spearheaded by Mills Corp.. Stifelman said the housing and office markets will likely benefit from infrastructure expansion related to the project, such as a light-rail loop expected to run throughout the complex and a new rail stop. Also in the complex, Millenium Homes has started construction on Equinox360, an upscale condominium project encompassing 614 units in two towers.

STT757
January 27th, 2007, 09:49 AM
I know they are not persuing a retractable roof but perhaps they could design the structure to be strong enough to support a temporary roof that could be put up for the Super Bowl, large concerts, NCAA final four, College Bowl game etc..

Something that could be rolled out, some kind of elastic material that could be rolled out and supported like the Carrier Dome in Syracuse.

Transic
March 8th, 2007, 11:50 AM
http://www.fredericknewspost.com/sections/business/display.htm?StoryID=57688

Canam scores with stadium job
Originally published March 08, 2007

By Ed Waters, Jr. (http://www.fredericknewspost.com/sections/customer_service/email_reporter.htm?writer=Ed Waters, Jr.)
News-Post Staff

POINT OF ROCKS -- A division of Canam Group Inc. will make steel components for a $1.4 billion sports stadium for the New York Giants and New York Jets in New Jersey.

Linda Norris, spokeswoman for the company, said Wednesday that one of the production lines at the plant is being upgraded with new equipment for the project and that 30 to 40 additional hires will be made during the coming year.

Structal-Heavy Steel Construction, a division of Canam Group, will provide joists, structural beams and other sections of the steel aspect of the stadium for the contractor, Skanska USA Civil.

"Over the years, we've participated in the construction of 14 stadiums or sports facilities for professional teams," said Structal president Luc Pelland. "Our reputation in the construction of complex projects and our commitment to customer satisfaction are Structal's major trademarks."

The plant currently has 220 employees.

"We expect to hire about 30 to 40 in the plant, and perhaps five in the office," Norris said.

She said many of the larger steel components will be manufactured at the company's plant in St. Gedeon, Quebec. "We normally do joists," Norris said, "but we expect to get the runover from the Canadian plant and we are preparing one of our lines for that."

Fabrication of the components will begin this summer, with completion scheduled for the end of 2008.

The 82,000-seat stadium is expected to be ready in 2010. It is the first time two professional football teams have formed a partnership to build a stadium.

In recent years, Structal and Canam Group have been associated with many other construction projects in North America, most recently two baseball stadiums in New York City. Other Structal projects include the Patriots' Stadium in New England; the Eagles' Stadium in Philadelphia; the Newseum in Washington, D.C.; the Boston Convention & Exhibition Center; the Niagara Falls Casino; the Lester B. Pearson International Airport in Toronto; the Montreal-Trudeau International Airport; as well as a number of aluminum smelters for Alcan and Pechiney.

Canam Group Inc. is an industrial company operating 11 plants specialized in the fabrication and design of construction products and solutions. The company employs close to 3,000 people in Canada, the United States, Romania and India, and has partnerships with companies in Mexico, France, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Russia.
__________________________________________________ ___________

http://www.cnw.ca/fr/releases/archive/March2007/07/c7662.html

Structal Lands $100 M Contract for the Structure of the New York Giants' and Jets' Stadium

BOUCHERVILLE, QC, March 7 /CNW Telbec/ - Structal-Heavy Steel Construction ("Structal"), a business unit of Canam Group Inc. (TSX: CAM), located in Point of Rocks, MD, has landed a contract to fabricate the steel structure that will be used to build the new football stadium owned jointly by the New York Giants and New York Jets. The contract awarded to Structal by Skanska Koch is valued at just over CAN$100 million, while the cost of building the stadium is estimated at nearly US$1.4 billion (CAN$1.7 billion). Skanska USA Civil has a prime design-build contract valued at US$998 million(CAN$1.2 billion).

This is the first time in football history that two professional teams have formed a partnership to build a new stadium. The 82,000-seat stadium is expected to open in 2010. It will be built between the Giants' current stadium and the recreational Meadowlands Xanadu complex in East Rutherford, NJ. This complex, which is currently under construction, is another Structal project.

"Over the years, we've participated in the construction of 14 stadiums or sports facilities for professional teams," says Structal president Luc Pelland. "Our reputation in the construction of complex projects and our commitment to customer satisfaction are Structal's major trademarks."

"The fact that we were awarded this contract is largely due to our tremendous production capacity and the expertise of our team," adds Charlie Watson, president of Structal's U.S. division.

Fabrication of the structural steel components will begin in the summer of 2007 at Canam Group's St. Gédéon, QC and Point of Rocks, MD plants and will be completed around the end of 2008.

Skanska Koch, a division of Skanska, is a world-class company recognized for its complete range of services in the construction industry. Skanska Koch's main office is located in Carteret, New Jersey.

Structal-Heavy Steel Construction is specialized in major and complex construction projects, complete with engineering support and design-build services as well as project management.

In recent years, Structal and Canam Group have been associated with many other complex and prestigious construction projects in North America, most recently two baseball stadiums in New York City. Other eminent Structal projects include the Patriots' Stadium in New England; the Eagles' Stadium in Philadelphia; the Newseum in Washington, DC; the Boston Convention & Exhibition Center; the Niagara Falls Casino; the Lester B. Pearson International Airport in Toronto; the Montréal-Trudeau International Airport; as well as a number of aluminum smelters for Alcan and Péchiney.

Canam Group Inc. is an industrial company operating 11 plants specialized in the fabrication and design of construction products and solutions. The company employs close to 3,000 people in Canada, the United States, Romania and India, and has partnerships with companies in Mexico, France, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Russia.

Transic
March 27th, 2007, 01:32 AM
Yikes! :eek: I hope that they got good legal represenation and great financial advisors. Otherwise...

http://img135.imageshack.us/img135/6782/2122802swscan00014ow6.jpg

http://img182.imageshack.us/img182/6559/2122803swscan00015uf8.jpg

http://img182.imageshack.us/img182/1115/2122804swscan00016lu3.jpg

Transic
March 27th, 2007, 07:42 PM
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601079&sid=aPFr4Kh.hGN0&refer=home

NFL Permits Giants, Jets to Borrow $1.5 Billion (Update1)

By Aaron Kuriloff

March 27 (Bloomberg) -- The New York Giants and Jets won approval to exceed the National Football League's team debt ceiling and borrow as much as $750 million each to help fund a shared stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey.

NFL owners, meeting in Phoenix, voted to allow the teams to borrow five times the $150 million a franchise typically permitted under the league's rules because of the high cost of building a stadium in the New York market, said Jets President Jay Cross.

"I think we're looking at 40-year money,'' Cross said. "It'll be bonds, some combination of floating and fixed. I don't think that's been decided yet.''

Cross said Citigroup Inc. is handling the Jets' financing, while Goldman Sachs Group Inc. and Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. are working with the Giants.

The teams plan to break ground in May on the stadium, Cross said. The project, estimated to cost at least $1.4 billion, will be built near their current home, Giants Stadium, and is scheduled to open in 2010.

Building the new stadium has already required the league to waive some of its financial rules. NFL owners voted 30-2 in December to grant the teams a combined $300 million for the stadium, twice the previous high, from a league fund that provides money for construction.

Naming Rights

Steven Tisch, co-owner of the Giants, said the teams would increase efforts to identify naming rights sponsors and sell luxury suites for the new stadium.

"It's now going to be a function of staying on budget in terms of construction, and selling our premium seating for as much money as we can get,'' he said.

Cross said the teams would next begin making presentations to bond-rating services and may complete the financing in April or May.

The teams' plans call for building an 84,000-seat stadium, according to a document submitted to the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and the Meadowlands Commission.

The Giants plan to build a 20-acre training complex in the southwest corner of the development, along with parking areas and tailgating zones. Broadcast facilities, sports medicine clinics, stores, restaurants and a New Jersey Transit rail spur also are part of the project.

To contact the reporter on this story: Aaron Kuriloff in New York at akuriloff@bloomberg.net (akuriloff@bloomberg.net).

Last Updated: March 27, 2007 16:46 EDT
__________________________________________________ __________

http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkxMDYmZmdi ZWw3Zjd2cWVlRUV5eTcwOTc4NjImeXJpcnk3ZjcxN2Y3dnFlZU VFeXk2

Jets and Giants close to breaking ground

Friday, March 23, 2007

By JOHN BRENNAN
STAFF WRITER

NEW YORK -- The New York Jets and Giants expect to break ground on their Meadowlands football stadium in just six weeks, Jets President Jay Cross said Thursday at a sports business conference in Manhattan.

The May 1 groundbreaking is about a month sooner than club executives previously estimated, and Cross said during a panel discussion at the World Congress of Sports that the teams still expect to begin play at the replacement for Giants Stadium in the fall of 2010.

The two National Football League teams are footing the lion's share of the $1.4 billion construction costs, with the NFL chipping in $300 million. But the teams may recoup a huge chunk of that investment from both a naming-rights deal and an innovative plan to have four "cornerstone partners" in addition to the overall naming rights winner, Cross told the audience.

Four 5,000-square-foot scoreboards, in the corners of the stadium, would promote a different cornerstone partner, with the each partner also likely to receive 60 to 100 season tickets in its corner as part of the deal.

Cross didn't discuss naming-rights prices, but he said the opportunities for corporations go well beyond the chance to put naming rights on the new stadium and on the Meadowlands Sports Complex.

"We're the NFL, so that's a premium, and we're in New York, so there's a premium for New York, and you're getting two teams instead of one -- and well, you may not have to pay twice, but you pay more than once," Cross said.

Cross wasn't the only one making geographically challenged comments. The panel discussion in which he participated was titled, "New York, New York," even though the other panelists all were executives of New Jersey-based teams: Jeff Vanderbeek of the Devils, Brett Yormark of the Nets and Nick Sakiewicz of the Red Bulls.

The Giants and Jets have yet to make architectural renderings of the new stadium public.

"We've been focused on trying to get the design complete enough to allow us to produce renderings that are worth showing," Cross said. "It's just a constant work in progress. There will be 82,000 or 83,000 seats, and we will mimic the seating bowl from Giants Stadium. But other than that, there won't be many similarities to the new place."

Sakiewicz said that Red Bull Park is scheduled to open in Harrison in July 2008, adding that preparation work for driving piles to build the 25,000-seat soccer stadium will begin in about two weeks. He said the stadium will be expandable to 40,000 or 50,000 seats, a concept he said is likely to become more prevalent in stadium designs.

E-mail: brennan@northjersey.com

* * *
What's next

The Jets and Giants have a few logistical hurdles left before they begin work on their new football stadium. Their goals:

Next week -- Obtain approval from National Football League rivals during league meetings in Phoenix on their plan to borrow more than $1 billion to build the stadium.

Mid-April -- Get final environmental approvals from the New Jersey Meadowlands Commission and other state agencies.

April 25 -- Receive final master-plan approval for the stadium design from the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority's board.

May 1 -- Break ground.

JCMAN320
March 30th, 2007, 01:51 PM
Extreme makeover: Meadowlands edition

Friday, March 30, 2007
BY MATTHEW FUTTERMAN
Star-Ledger Staff

Say goodbye to drab concrete and hello to shining aluminum and glass.

After more than a year of debate, the Giants and Jets are closing in on a final design of their $1.2 billion stadium at the Meadowlands Sports Complex. Earlier this month, the teams revealed the essence of the building they will construct, as well as the new Giants practice facility, in a preliminary planning document they submitted to the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority.

While there is still time to make aesthetic changes before -- and even for some time after -- the planned groundbreaking in June, the plans for the yet-to-be-named stadium provide the first glimpses of a building the teams expect to become the signature venue for the National Football League. It will open in 2010.

As the documents reveal, there is a little something for everyone here: tailgate zones, lined football fields in the parking lot for pickup games, field-level suites for the team owners, multiple stadium clubs and a plaza area that connects a new rail station to the stadium. For two teams that have been rivals for years, on and off the field, the near-final plans for the stadium are a significant development.

"The cooperation between the teams has been very impressive," said Carl Goldberg, chairman of the sports authority, which operates the complex. "They seem to be of the same mind-set."

The stadium:

The skin: Current plans call for it to be wrapped with horizontal metal louvers -- think silver aluminum siding turned sideways -- that designers say will have a lightening effect on the massive building.

The lights: Colored lighting will be installed within the metal louvers and can make the building glow red and blue for the Giants, green and white for the Jets, or scarlet red if Rutgers ever wants to play there.

The zones: The plaza area surrounding the stadium will be divided into several zones, where fans can take part in activities. They include a tailgate zone, a fantasy football zone and one zone called "Fields in a Forest," described as several football fields lined on concrete and separated by trees where fans can play pickup football before games.

The seats: Three tiers hold 76,767 general and club seats.

The suites: More than 200 that account for 4,971 seats, located on four levels -- 25 are on field level, including the team owners' suites, 67 are on the first concourse level, 78 are on the next level and 57 are a level above that.

The premium seats: The 9,222 premium seats are near the stadium club areas that will provide exclusive indoor eating and drinking opportunities for club seat holders

The displaced: Exact club seat locations are not finalized, however plans call for 2,000 club seats on the east side of the stadium's lower level and connecting to the "40-40 Club." In situations when other stadiums have been replaced, fans who had owned seats in areas that in the new stadium became premium seating were given the chance to upgrade to a more expensive seat or move to another, general seating area of the building.

Soccer-ready: The field is designed to meet international soccer standards. This one does. The soccer field dimensions are 105 meters by 68 meters, with extra room in the corners for corner kicks.

Playing surface: It's FieldTurf, just like Giants Stadium has.

The training facility: It's traditional red brick (what else would you expect from the Giants?), with four outdoor fields and one full-sized field under a bubble.

STT757
March 30th, 2007, 05:10 PM
There were renderings along with the article, they are not final renderings but gives an idea of what it will look like. The lighting as described at night will really make this stadium shine.

Transic
April 2nd, 2007, 09:31 AM
http://img112.imageshack.us/img112/7307/biz029ajb0.jpg

http://www.nypost.com/seven/04022007/business/the_name_game_business_holly_m__sanders.htm

THE NAME GAME

STADIUM'S TITLE COULD FETCH $20M-PLUS A YEAR

By HOLLY M. SANDERS

April 2, 2007 -- After two blockbuster deals for stadium naming rights in the last year, the New York Giants and Jets are salivating to put a name on their planned $1 billion-plus stadium.

The Giants and Jets are gearing up to shop the naming rights after a crucial financing plan was approved this week, clearing the last barrier to building the stadium.

The team owners are looking to fetch a price north of $20 million a year, coming on the heels of other record-breaking stadium deals in the New York market.

There's little doubt the two-team stadium will top Citigroup's deal with the New York Mets stadium and Barclay's play for the New Jersey Nets arena. Both companies reportedly agreed to pay $400 million over 20 years.

After those unprecedented prices, veteran sports marketers said the Giants-Jets football stadium has taken center stage, offering the biggest market and two of the biggest teams in the National Football League.

"The asking price is high and the owners' expectations changed when the Mets and Nets deals were done," said one source familiar with those naming deals.

Wasserman Media Group, which was tapped to sell the Giants-Jets naming rights, has already met with a handful of potential buyers over the last few months, the source said.

"As the most valuable naming rights opportunity in the media capital of the world, the [stadium] has generated unprecedented interest in the marketplace," said Jeff Knapple, president of Wasserman's marketing division.

At a high asking price, it's a given that only corporations with deep pockets, such as a big bank, phone company or car maker, would be able to do the deal, marketers said.

The buyer will want more than a sign on the stadium and its own suite. Before the corporate board will agree to that kind of cash, the buyer will have to consider all the angles, ranging from TV exposure to team events.

"It is certainly not enough to justify such a high price to put a corporate brand name on a building," said Phil de Picciotto, president at sports marketing firm Octagon. "That may have been common in the early days of sports marketing, but it's not rational today.

One looming question is when will a deal get done? Sports marketers said stadium-naming deals can take place anywhere from a couple of months to six months. But the complexity and size of the Giants-Jets stadium could take longer - up to two years.

In addition, the ink on the design for Giants-Jets stadium is barely dry, so potential buyers are just now beginning to see the building take shape. The stadium won't be completed until 2010, a full year after the new Mets and Nets buildings open.

"Everyone is waiting," said one source familiar with the stadium deal. "There is a lot of pressure."

Transic
April 26th, 2007, 07:23 AM
http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk0NSZmZ2Jl bDdmN3ZxZWVFRXl5NzEyMjk0MiZ5cmlyeTdmNzE3Zjd2cWVlRU V5eTM=

Giants-Jets stadium plan passes 'milestone'

Thursday, April 26, 2007

By JOHN BRENNAN
STAFF WRITER

EAST RUTHERFORD -- The Giants and Jets plan to start driving piles and relocating utilities at the site of their new $1.4 billion football stadium within two to three weeks following Wednesday's tentative approval of their master plan.

"We achieved the milestone we sought today," Mary Musca, an executive for the joint stadium venture, said after gaining the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority board's endorsement. "We need to mobilize on the site, and now we can get to work."

But the sports authority held off on blanket approval for the master plan, because the teams have yet to offer anything more than generic schematics of what the stadium exterior will look like.

"We're still looking for mockups, we're still looking for a final design," agency Vice Chairman Joseph Buckelew said.

Musca said the teams hope to show the board an exterior rendering "in a month or two," along with final details on the materials to be used in construction. A formal groundbreaking ceremony is planned for this summer. At least 7,000 piles will be driven during the next year, she added.

Carl Goldberg, the sports authority's chairman, said the tentative approval struck a balance that allowed work to begin, even though Buckelew's subcommittee report found the exterior renderings "insufficiently complete." The report also called the landscape design plan "insufficiently detailed."

"The distinction is that this work that we're allowing has no relevance to whatever exterior design is chosen," Goldberg said. "We're just reserving the right to preclude subsequent construction, pending receipt of the final architectural details."

The stadium, to be funded by the teams, with $300 million in aid from the National Football League, will be the most expensive sports facility in the United States. The Giants and Jets hope to begin play in 2010 at the replacement for 31-year-old Giants Stadium.

Sports authority Vice President James Minish said agency concerns about parking and staffing appear to have been solved since a preliminary master plan was approved in October.

The teams plan to begin demolition next month of a portion of one set of escalators at Giants Stadium's Gate B -- in the northeastern corner where the new stadium will be erected. Temporary turnstiles and security checkpoints must be in place by the time concerts and soccer games are held in June and July, Minish said.

The agency is requiring that the second phase of the stadium project -- which would include 500,000 square feet of retail and would be built after the new stadium opened -- to be covered by a separate master plan.

E-mail: brennan@northjersey.com

Transic
April 28th, 2007, 12:38 AM
http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk0NSZmZ2Jl bDdmN3ZxZWVFRXl5NzEyMzQyMCZ5cmlyeTdmNzE3Zjd2cWVlRU V5eTM=

Giants-Jets Stadium scores approval

Friday, April 27, 2007

By JOHN BRENNAN
STAFF WRITER

The new Meadowlands football stadium was given the go-ahead by two state environmental agencies on Thursday -- the second key endorsement for the joint venture of the Giants and Jets within two days.

But just as with the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority's approval Wednesday, the latest approval came with provisions.

The teams' environmental impact statement was found to "raise many concerns," said Thursday's report from the state Department of Environmental Protection and the Meadowlands Commission.

Among those concerns is the possibility that any contaminated sediment might reach adjacent tidal creeks and wetlands. The agencies said that the teams' plan to "minimize" such contact must be upgraded to completely preclude the possibility.

The report also strongly recommended that "due to the past concerns over the fill materials beneath Giants Stadium, the use of known contaminated fill beneath any structures be abandoned."

The Meadowlands Commission scheduled a public hearing on the report for 10 a.m. Monday at the agency's office in Lyndhurst.

The commission, along with the DEP, serves in an advisory capacity for any development at the Meadowlands Sports Complex. George Zoffinger, the president of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, said that the recommendations previously have been heeded.

"The normal procedure is for us to review the entire report and then speak with the developer, who will be expected to adhere to it," Zoffinger said.
The public review process began with a hearing in July, followed by further hearings in December.

The site for the $1.4 billion stadium project contains PCBs, benzene and other compounds in excess of state guidelines, leading the agencies to recommend that the teams perform further research on the effects construction may have on nearby groundwater.

The report also described the impact statement prepared by the teams as being "weak on fiscal impacts, especially local fiscal impacts," with the public benefits quantified -- but not the public costs.

The teams have been instructed to submit quarterly progress reports on the recommendations, beginning in July.

"In general, staff finds that the overall project design appears to be positive," the report concluded.

The Giants and Jets plan to begin driving piles at the site next month, with a formal groundbreaking to follow this summer. The stadium is scheduled to open in 2010.

E-mail: brennan@northjersey.com

NYguy
April 29th, 2007, 10:48 AM
http://www.amny.com/news/local/ny-bc-nj--notnewyork0428apr28,0,5207496.story?coll=am-topheadlines

Bill would ban teams playing in N.J. from using "New York''

April 28, 2007

HACKENSACK, N.J. -- Normally it is Jersey fans who gripe that they don't get any respect from pro sports teams that play at the Meadowlands in East Rutherford but have "New York" in their names.

But three New York assemblymen recently sponsored a bill to stop football's Giants and Jets and soccer's Red Bulls from using the Empire State's name or abbreviation because they don't play their home games in New York.

"At the very least, the location of the place where a team plays should be accurate, and reflect where they actually play their home games," Assemblyman Ivan Lafayette, of Queens, writes in the bill, as reported by The Record of Bergen County in Saturday newspapers.

The legislation wasn't started here, but it seems to have some supporters in the Garden State.

"That bill does sound like a Jersey thing, which is ironic considering that over here we basically seem to have given up on this," George Zoffinger, head of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority told the newspaper. "But I think with all the money we give these teams, they should be called 'New Jersey."'

So far the bill _ co-sponsored by Assemblyman Jeffrey Dinowitz of the Bronx and Felix Ortiz of Brooklyn _ only applies to sports teams.

Officials from the three teams have adamantly said that they aren't going to change their names.

Information from: The Record of Bergen County, http://www.northjersey.com

ramvid01
April 29th, 2007, 01:11 PM
http://www.amny.com/news/local/ny-bc-nj--notnewyork0428apr28,0,5207496.story?coll=am-topheadlines

Bill would ban teams playing in N.J. from using "New York''

April 28, 2007

HACKENSACK, N.J. -- Normally it is Jersey fans who gripe that they don't get any respect from pro sports teams that play at the Meadowlands in East Rutherford but have "New York" in their names.

But three New York assemblymen recently sponsored a bill to stop football's Giants and Jets and soccer's Red Bulls from using the Empire State's name or abbreviation because they don't play their home games in New York.

"At the very least, the location of the place where a team plays should be accurate, and reflect where they actually play their home games," Assemblyman Ivan Lafayette, of Queens, writes in the bill, as reported by The Record of Bergen County in Saturday newspapers.

The legislation wasn't started here, but it seems to have some supporters in the Garden State.

"That bill does sound like a Jersey thing, which is ironic considering that over here we basically seem to have given up on this," George Zoffinger, head of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority told the newspaper. "But I think with all the money we give these teams, they should be called 'New Jersey."'

So far the bill _ co-sponsored by Assemblyman Jeffrey Dinowitz of the Bronx and Felix Ortiz of Brooklyn _ only applies to sports teams.

Officials from the three teams have adamantly said that they aren't going to change their names.

Information from: The Record of Bergen County, http://www.northjersey.com

Wow. Dumbest bill ever. It's not like they haven't tried to get their stadiums built in NY. Not their fault if they can't find a suitable place.

JCMAN320
April 29th, 2007, 03:03 PM
Still we deserve respect. The important thing is that everyone knows the Red Bulls, Giants, and Jets play in New Jersey.

ramvid01
April 29th, 2007, 03:45 PM
Still we deserve respect. The important thing is that everyone knows the Red Bulls, Giants, and Jets play in New Jersey.

Everyone does, at least the fans who go to the stadiums do or watch the games.

JCMAN320
April 29th, 2007, 03:49 PM
But of course ramvid.

Alonzo-ny
April 30th, 2007, 07:00 AM
Cheap way to try and get "new" teams. They will never be the 'new jersey giants'

ZippyTheChimp
April 30th, 2007, 07:56 AM
Logos:

http://www.buckleshop.com/images/sfb090l.jpg

http://www.buckleshop.com/images/sfb100l.jpg

lofter1
April 30th, 2007, 08:24 AM
It don't have the same power, eh?

***

fioco
April 30th, 2007, 10:24 AM
Folks just lack imagination. We should take our cues from the Bronx Bombers! -- The East Rutherford Giants; The East Rutherford Jets (however, I prefer the Secaucus Jets); the Flushing Mets; and projecting into the future: the Moynihan Station West Knicks. Who needs corporate branding? The new green rage is 'go local'.

Eugenious
April 30th, 2007, 03:23 PM
Wow. Dumbest bill ever. It's not like they haven't tried to get their stadiums built in NY. Not their fault if they can't find a suitable place.


They should just merge NJ with NY and create New Jerk.

:P

Transic
May 30th, 2007, 07:56 PM
http://www.usatoday.com/sports/football/nfl/2007-05-29-meadowlands-parking_N.htm

Parking to become quagmire at Giants Stadium

By Ernie Palladino, The (Westchester, N.Y.) Journal News

Attending a New York Giants or Jets game will be a bit more costly for certain fans and a lot more inconvenient for others until the teams' new stadium opens around 2010.

Beginning this season, the teams will institute a pre-paid permit system for entrance to the Giants Stadium lots.

Only season-ticket holders with permits, priced at $150 each, will be allowed to park in the Meadowlands complex. Those without permits will have to travel to an off-site lot approximately two miles away and take a shuttle bus to the game.

Details on how frequently the shuttle buses leave before and after the game are still being finalized. But Giants ticketholder Kathy Farber could see where tempers among permit and non-permit holders could boil over after the final gun.

"It's not getting to the game, but getting out," she said, noting that the traditional post-game congestion is already a challenge, even without having to deal with shuttle buses. "People are hyped up to get into the game, but they're aggravated getting out."

The new policy comes into effect because the new stadium's construction site will eat up approximately 5,000 parking spots.

The problem won't ease until the new stadium opens and the current stadium is razed.

The permits average out to $15 per game, covering the eight regular-season and two preseason games. That's the same price fans paid to park on the stadium side of the complex last season, but a $5 per game hike for those who parked on the arena side.

The permits will be allotted on a scale determined by the number of season tickets in each holder's account. The plans are basically the same, with the major differences coming at the higher ends.

Here is the Giants' breakdown:

• Ticket holders with 1-5 tickets: One permit.
• 6-10 tickets: Two permits.
• 11-15 tickets: Three permits.
• 16-20 tickets: Four permits.
• 21-25 tickets: Five permits.
• 26 or more tickets: Six permits.

The Jets will follow the same policy as the Giants, except they will allow accounts with 21-50 tickets to buy five permits. Those holding 50 tickets or more will be allowed six permits.

Alex Cestaro, a Giants season-ticket holder for 10 years, said the tailgating scene will suffer the most.

"I know a lot of people who tailgate," Cestaro said. "Some of these guys used to take up four, five parking spaces with the booze set-up and the satellite TV and lounge chairs.

"How do you fit one of those mobile homes in one space? They're taking a lot away here, and it'll probably get worse."

Still, don't expect a reduced crowd at either team's games because of the new policy.

"There will still be close to 80,000 fans there on Sunday," Cestaro said. "It's still fun."

Said Farber: "It's not going to be easy on any of us, but I'll be there. It's like the ticket prices. People will complain, but when kickoff comes around, they'll still be there."

Transic
June 11th, 2007, 09:12 AM
http://www.courant.com/news/local/hc-sa-giants3jun11,0,6552506.story?coll=hc-headlines-local

Tailgating On The Train: Metro-North To Serve Giants Stadium

June 11, 2007
By Mark Ginocchio, Stamford Advocate

The New Haven Line's colors will soon be Big Blue and Gang Green.

A regional train service that would originate in Connecticut and take passengers to Secaucus, N.J., for Jets and Giants football games at Giants Stadium is in the works, the state Department of Transportation and the Metropolitan Transportation Authority revealed last week.

The service, which DOT officials said is a pilot program, could be launched in time for the 2009 season and would run on Sunday game days through the fall and winter.

"This is something we've been looking at for some time," said Eugene Colonese, administrator in the DOT's rail bureau. "We're still figuring out the service levels and the scheduling."

Trains originating in New Haven would travel on Metro-North Railroad tracks to New Rochelle, N.Y., then branch off on the Hell's Gate route used by Amtrak through Co-op City in the Bronx and Queens, N.Y., then into Penn Station in Manhattan.

From there, trains would travel on tracks used by NJ Transit to Secaucus, where passengers then would catch a shuttle train to the Meadowlands.

NJ Transit equipment likely will be used, Colonese said. New Haven Line trains are not equipped to run into Penn Station or on NJ Transit tracks, he said.

The New Haven Line was selected because the MTA and DOT found that a large number of Giants fans live in Fairfield and Westchester counties, Colonese said.

It is the second sports stadium service being developed by the DOT and the MTA.

Last month, Metro-North officials said they agreed on a funding plan for a new station at Yankee Stadium for the 2009 opening of a new ballpark.

Connecticut is working with Metro-North and MTA to determine a schedule of New Haven Line trains that would run direct to Yankee Stadium when the new station opens.

Direct service likely would run only on weekends; during the week, New Haven Line commuters probably will have to transfer at Harlem-125th Street for stadium-bound trains.

JCMAN320
July 24th, 2007, 09:32 PM
Jets, Giants don't want roof over new stadium

http://www.nj.com/hp/332/0724stadium.jpg
You can see how the stadium is postioned closer to the Big M and the new railstation

by Matthew Futterman
Tuesday July 24, 2007, 5:13 PM

The Jets and Giants said today they don't want a roof on their new stadium in the Meadowlands no matter how much it costs.

The comments came after the state released a report that showed putting a roof on the $1.2 billion stadium would cost another $421 million. From the start, the teams have resisted enclosing the stadium. They've said a roof would cost too much and would eliminate the home-field advantage in cold weather. Still, the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority wanted a formal accounting of the project.

Alice McGillion, a spokesman for the Meadowlands stadium venture, said today the Jets and Giants are committed to an open air facility.

"There is no change in the original plan because of this report," McGillion said. "This is something the NJSEA wanted. We had determined that this was not economically feasible."

The new stadium is scheduled to open in 2010.

Transic
August 11th, 2007, 02:44 PM
http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXkzJmZnYmVs N2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk3MTgwMjkyJnlyaXJ5N2Y3MTdmN3ZxZWVFRX l5Mg==

Shuttling past growing pains

Saturday, August 11, 2007

By WILLIAM LAMB
STAFF WRITER

LYNDHURST -- The satellite-lot-and-shuttle-bus system that got lousy reviews at last month's Live Earth concert appeared to fare much better before Friday's preseason National Football League opener at Giants Stadium.

The Jets hired 65 shuttle buses to ferry fans to the stadium from eight parking lots near Route 17 – more than twice as many as were initially available for the July 7 Live Earth concert.

Organizers moved the drop-off point away from the stadium and closer to Route 3, with an eye toward speeding the round-trips from Lyndhurst.

"Everything seems to be going quite smoothly," William D. Squires, a consultant for the Jets and Giants, said prior to the 7 p.m. kickoff. "The buses seem to be faster, and having several pick-up and drop-off points helps, too."

Not that any of this stopped some Jets fans from complaining about the $25 fee for the privilege of parking in one of the remote lots, or the half-mile or so that many had to walk from their cars to catch a shuttle bus to the stadium, where the Jets were hosting the Atlanta Falcons.

More than a few were put off by a strict no-tailgating rule that did not apply to fans lucky enough to have a prepaid parking pass that got them into the main stadium lot.

"It just kind of puts a damper on the whole experience," Dave Ippolito, 21, of Westwood said as he rode a bus to the stadium with his brother Mike, 34.

Ippolito added that it was "a slap in the face" to be charged $25 to park in a satellite lot a day before Giants fans will pay just $20 before the team's preseason opener against the Carolina Panthers.

"I don't like paying 25 bucks," said Paul Reidmiller, 33, who drove from Bangor, Pa., with his son, Tyler, 8, to catch the game. "Now I know why I'm more of a Giants fan."

Like it or not, football fans will have to live with the system while a new $1.5 billion stadium is being built on what used to be 5,000 parking spots northeast of the existing Giants Stadium.

At the same time, construction of a $175 million extension of NJ Transit's Pascack Valley rail line and the $2 billion Xanadu shopping and entertainment complex are adding to the difficulty of navigating the Meadowlands Sports Complex.

Some fans, such as Terry Randolph of Teaneck, said the setup wasn't so bad.

"It's a little inconvenient," said Randolph, who was briefly on the Jets' roster as a defensive back after he was drafted by the Green Bay Packers in 1977.

"But as a football fan you want to watch the game, so you've got to suffer a little inconvenience," Randolph said. "If it was raining, it would be a pain, but it's not. It's a little exercise."

Squires said he expected about 40,000 fans to attend Friday night's game.

Lyndhurst Police Chief James B. O'Connor said the parking operation already seemed to be working better than it did for the Live Earth show. O'Connor said he expected it to improve even more after this weekend's games.

"We've got a game tonight and a game tomorrow night," O'Connor said. "We'll see how effective the parking operation is, how effective the cleanup is. This is going to be a pretty good test."

E-mail: lamb@northjersey.com

Transic
August 16th, 2007, 08:13 PM
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601079&sid=aMFpxM2I7kWU&refer=home

Jets, Giants Close $1.3 Billion in Stadium Financing (Update3)

By Aaron Kuriloff

Aug. 16 (Bloomberg) -- The New York Jets and Giants football teams completed a $1.3 billion financing agreement to build an 84,000-seat stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey.

The Jets borrowed $650 million from Citigroup Inc. and the Royal Bank of Canada, while the Giants got the same amount from Goldman Sachs Group Inc. and Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc., Jets President Jay Cross said in an interview.

The transaction shows the strength of the National Football League, which had revenue of $6 billion last year, even during a global financial crunch brought on by the subprime mortgage crisis, said Marc Ganis, president of SportsCorp Ltd., a Chicago-based sports industry consulting firm.

"Even in a time of extraordinarily tight credit, these teams are still able to raise huge sums of money,'' Ganis said.

The facility will be constructed near Giants Stadium, the teams' current home, and is scheduled to open in 2010. The teams agreed to split the cost after the Jets failed to secure approval for a stadium on Manhattan's West Side.

The Giants-Jets stadium will be the most expensive in U.S. history, topping the $1 billion the Dallas Cowboys say they are spending on their new arena in Arlington, Texas, and it required the league to waive some of its financial rules.

League owners voted 30-2 in December to grant the teams a combined $300 million, twice the previous high, from a fund that provides money for construction. In March, the owners voted 31-1 to allow the teams to borrow almost five times the typical $150 franchise limit, and carry the debt as long as 25 years due to the costs associated with building a stadium in the New York area.

TV Income

The NFL's 32 teams each received $84.7 million from national television contracts last season, according to financial records of the Green Bay Packers, the league's only publicly held franchise.

The Giants plan to build a 20-acre training complex in the southwest corner of the development. Broadcast facilities, sports-medicine clinics, stores, restaurants and a New Jersey Transit rail spur also are part of the project.

To contact the reporter on this story: Aaron Kuriloff in New York at ceichelberge@bloomberg.net (ceichelberge@bloomberg.net)

Last Updated: August 16, 2007 18:42 EDT

H-man
August 17th, 2007, 12:05 PM
im starting to wonder if theyll ever release the designs

ramvid01
August 18th, 2007, 02:03 AM
im starting to wonder if theyll ever release the designs

Theres actually a rendering of it in this thread. I believe its just a few pages back.

H-man
August 18th, 2007, 05:04 AM
its not an offical one its like a knock off or a what it could be

Transic
September 5th, 2007, 09:35 AM
It looks like these are it. There will be a press conference on the new stadium today at 11:00 a.m.. Images from the NY Times:

http://img411.imageshack.us/img411/5280/05stadium1600wo0.jpg

http://img402.imageshack.us/img402/5586/05stadium2650kh9.jpg

http://img411.imageshack.us/img411/7798/05stadium3650cu6.jpg

lofter1
September 5th, 2007, 10:53 AM
What a snoozer ^^^

When compared to stadiums going up in Europe and China it's laughable.

JCMAN320
September 5th, 2007, 11:29 AM
Yea I'm kinda dissappointed myself, even compared to current NFL stadiums this doen't look impressive at all. It looks like a metal wire basket with some green felt in it.

This is the best the Giants and Jets could come up with?

66nexus
September 5th, 2007, 01:07 PM
I love the inside, but the outside looks like a damn slinky

JCMAN320
September 5th, 2007, 02:27 PM
Jets, Giants are at work on $1.3B stadium

by The Associated Press Wednesday September 05, 2007, 11:49 AM

The New York Giants and New York Jets broke ground today on the first stadium to be jointly owned by two NFL teams and unveiled how architects plan to make two competing teams feel at home in a $1.3 billion stadium.

"Ensuring that the stadium would feel like home to both teams and both groups of fans was our goal and also one of the biggest challenges in the design of the stadium," said Steve Tisch, chairman and executive vice president of the New York Giants.

To do that, the stadium will feature an 8-story mega display, called the "Great Wall," with 400-foot-long by 40-foot-high changeable panels featuring either team's logo or neutral colors for non-football events.

Tisch, Giants President and CEO John Mara and Jets Chairman and CEO Woody Johnson unveiled the design at a ceremony also attended by New Jersey Gov. Jon S. Corzine and NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell.

The yet unnamed building, for which owners are still working on a naming-rights deal, will host 20 NFL games each season - more than any football stadium in the country.

Being constructed next to the existing Giants Stadium, the new field is expected to open for the 2010 season and seat 82,500 in a bowl-design, where seats in the front row are planted 46 feet from the sidelines. Fans will also find a 300,000-square-foot outdoor plaza for tailgating.

While today's event marked the official ground breaking, infrastructure work is already under way on the open-air facility at the Meadowlands sports complex.

In addition to the design of the building, planners have been working to make access to the facility easier. Lanes into the Meadowlands will increase to more than 40 from the existing 16 and a new rail facility will connect the stadium to New York's Penn Station through Secaucus beginning in February 2009.

The teams cleared a large hurdle last month when each completed separate $650 million financing deals. CitiCorp is financing the Jets' portion, while investment banks Goldman Sachs and Lehman Brothers are financing the Giants' deal.

The teams also received a financial boost earlier this year when NFL owners approved $300 million in loans for stadium work.

The teams announced plans to build a stadium together two years ago, after the Jets' plans for a stadium on Manhattan's West Side fell through. The Giants had been planning to build a new stadium themselves.

Now, the Giants will also construct a new training facility at the Meadowlands, while the Jets are building their own in Florham Park.

The stadium is one of several new major sports facilities opening in the New York metropolitan area. New homes are also being built for the New York Mets, the New York Yankees, the New Jersey Nets and the New Jersey Devils.

The Devils hockey team is leaving Continental Airlines Arena at the Meadowlands for the Prudential Center, opening in downtown Newark in October.

JCMAN320
September 5th, 2007, 02:42 PM
Here is a photo rundown of all the new stadiums going up in New York and New Jersey:

NY Giants/NY Jets - New Meadowlands Stadium, East Rutherford, NJ
http://img402.imageshack.us/img402/5586/05stadium2650kh9.jpg


New Jersey Devils - Prudential Center aka "The Rock", Newark, NJ
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/c/c8/Prudential_Center_Exterior.png/800px-Prudential_Center_Exterior.png


New York Red Bulls - Red Bull Park, Harrison, NJ
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/8/80/XjfoOv95.jpg


New York Yankees - Yankee Stadium, Bronx, NY
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/da/Newyankeestadium.jpg


New York Mets - Citi Field, Queens, NY
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/11/Citi_Field_Promo.jpg


New Jersey Nets - Barclays Center, Brooklyn, NY
http://www.atlanticyards.com/graphics/may06/gehry5.jpg

lofter1
September 5th, 2007, 02:44 PM
Given the sstate of the economy that last one will never get built as shown ^^^

66nexus
September 5th, 2007, 02:49 PM
Given the sstate of the economy that last one will never get built as shown ^^^

Ugh! Brooklyn should hope not, that thing is hideous. It looks like as if looking at the building through a shroud of steam, the way it curves like that

Transic
September 5th, 2007, 07:24 PM
http://img77.imageshack.us/img77/1363/greathallhl3.jpg

http://img77.imageshack.us/img77/2610/birdseyemr9.jpg

http://img77.imageshack.us/img77/8637/sectiontz3.jpg

http://img77.imageshack.us/img77/1888/inbowlyp2.jpg

http://img77.imageshack.us/img77/3672/siteplanzi2.jpg

You can go to http://www.nynjfootball.com/ for more info. :)

JCMAN320
September 9th, 2007, 09:26 PM
Apparently it will be comparable to a Stadium in Munich that houses two soccer teams. It changes colors to suit both teams.

According to Wikipedia.org:

"The new stadium the Jets and the Giants are scheduled to occupy in 2010 will be distinguished by an outer skin of aluminum louvers and by interior lighting that will switch colors depending on which team is playing at home – comparable to the Allianz Arena in Munich, Germany."

The Allianz Arena aka the Inflatable Boat...
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0e/Allianz_Arena_Pahu.jpg/800px-Allianz_Arena_Pahu.jpg

"Allianza Arena is lit up in red when Bayern Munich play, in blue when 1860 Munich play and in white when in use by the German National Team."
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5c/Allianzarenacombo.jpg

So this is rougly what we can expect the New Meadowlands Stadium to look like; Blue/Red Giants and Green/White Jets play and bright Red when Rutgers wants to play there.

New Meadowlands Stadium aka the Slinky
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/3/31/Newmeadowlands.jpg

66nexus
September 9th, 2007, 09:39 PM
The one in Munich, besides the lit colors, is pretty bad. It just has a 'blimp' look...very uninspiring. People get paid good money to design these things, so...WTF?:confused:

JCMAN320
September 9th, 2007, 11:16 PM
Jets fans call stadium parking a fumble

by Suleman Din Sunday September 09, 2007, 7:51 PM

Many Jets fans today said they were confused, inconvenienced and downright annoyed.

And that was before an injured Chad Pennington staggered off the field.

With 5,000 parking spaces eaten up by construction of a new stadium for the Giants and Jets, fans without permit parking passes were directed into a cluster of office park lots almost a five-mile drive away from the Meadowlands Sports Complex, where work will continue for three more years and affect all major events.

Those fans arrived at the off-site lots yesterday and paid $25, cash only, for parking. Big signs outside the lots stated tailgating was not allowed, and police warned those who tried to stow their offending grills. Fans were then directed to a line of idling school buses, which transported 40 people at a time to Giants Stadium.

Naturally, most were peeved.

"They're inconveniencing us, and asking us to pay for it," said Roger Lowenstein, a Jets season ticket holder from Westfield.

Some fans began yelling outside the buses, confused by the system of nine color-coded lots at the Wall Street West office park. Where would they be dropped off? How would they get back? Why were they going in old yellow school buses?

Lost on the irate fans were the complex planning and logistics behind the satellite parking, said William D. Squires, operations consultant to the Jets and Giants. It required spaces for 3,288 vehicles, approximately 8,000 people moved back and forth by 70 buses and an additional staff of 200 to direct, clean and provide safety -- not to mention 10 police officers, a tow truck and an EMT crew for emergencies.

To secure the parking lots in the office park, Squires said the teams agreed to the ban on
tailgating demanded by the property owners.

Read more in Monday's Star-Ledger

STT757
September 23rd, 2007, 01:02 PM
Uniting Suburbs, One Rail Project at a Time

By KEN BELSON
Published: September 23, 2007
After many stops and starts, the area’s major commuter railroads are finally trying to make it easier for people to get from Connecticut to New Jersey.

That is if you are a Giants or a Jets fan.

By the fall of 2009, rail officials hope to run Metro-North trains from New Haven to Pennsylvania Station and then on to Secaucus Junction, where Giants and Jets fans can switch trains and ride one stop to a new station being built in the Meadowlands on a 1.9-mile-long rail spur now under construction. The project is estimated to cost $190 million.

The game-day trains, which have been in the works for several months, have received crucial backing from the governors of Connecticut, New Jersey and New York, who, like rail officials and train advocates, see them as the first of many efforts to breach Manhattan’s geographical divide, uniting suburbs around the area.

“Our hope is that you would eventually have a more regional rail network,” said William M. Wheeler, the director of special project development and planning at the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which oversees the Metro-North and the Long Island railroads. “You’re seeing systems getting to the point where larger opportunities can now be explored.”

The efforts were jump-started earlier this year by Elliot G. Sander, chief executive of the authority, and his counterparts at New Jersey Transit. They have also received the blessing of New Jersey’s governor, Jon S. Corzine, a big proponent of plans to build a second train tunnel under the Hudson River.

Not to be outdone, Gov. M. Jodi Rell of Connecticut in June called for direct rail service to Penn Station for Metro-North trains on the New Haven Line, and instructed the state’s Department of Transportation to look at “every available option” to provide service to the West Side of Manhattan.

Later this year, Metro-North is expected to file a draft environmental impact statement with the Federal Transit Administration, outlining its plans for commuter service from Connecticut to Penn Station. The plan, however, does not include a proposal, which has been discussed for years, that would link Grand Central Terminal to Penn Station. That project, which would have given commuters easier access to both stations, has been shelved for now.

Planners also hope to run trains from Trenton to New Haven and from Poughkeepsie to Penn Station and then on to Long Island. New service to Yankee Stadium and expanded service to Shea Stadium are other possibilities, as well as the development of stations in the South Bronx and Co-op City in the Bronx. Many of these ideas will have to wait until capacity in and out of Penn Station is expanded in the next decade.

Coordinating trains from Connecticut to the Meadowlands, which are expected to run only on weekends during the football season, may not sound like sending men to the moon. But given the deep institutional fissures that have long separated Amtrak, the L.I.R.R., Metro-North and New Jersey Transit, it might as well be hailed as such.

The routes are not much of a problem. Amtrak already runs trains from Boston to New Haven, through Penn Station and Secaucus on their way to Philadelphia. But the railroads will need to use New Jersey Transit electric locomotives with coaches that could come from Metro-North.

Metro-North, New Jersey Transit and Amtrak must work out how to deploy their crews, particularly if they operate outside their normal territory. The railroads must figure out who will be liable if trains or other property are damaged.

Tickets are expected to cost the equivalent of the fare of riding from Connecticut to Grand Central Terminal plus the price of a New Jersey Transit ticket from Penn Station to the Meadowlands. But fare collection and revenue sharing need to be determined. Like nearly all public transportation, some portion of the service will be subsidized.

Scheduling is an issue, too. The New Jersey Transit trains that run to Connecticut on Sundays will need to return to the yard, to be serviced and in place for the Monday morning rush. That means service is possible only for day games. Amtrak must also grant permission to use its platforms and tracks leading in and out of Penn Station, which is already very crowded.

The agencies are confident they can work out the logistics and finances. Since all the planners and engineers are in-house, the costs of setting up the service are minimal.

But the project has taken up many man-hours, which has some riders and rail advocates wondering why so much effort is being spent on shuttling football fans to games when passengers are forced to stand during the busiest times of the work day and have trouble finding parking at stations.

They also say that the railroads are not thinking broadly enough about regional train transport. In several years, L.I.R.R. riders will have one-train access to the East Side of Manhattan, while New Jersey Transit is building a second commuter rail tunnel under the Hudson River that will increase capacity to the West Side.

But both of those efforts will include the construction of new stations that will require long walks to Grand Central Terminal and Penn Station to make connections. And the new stations will not connect the East and West Sides of Manhattan, as was originally envisioned.

The second tunnel “has devolved into a project with lofty goals into a six-track addition to Penn Station,” said Albert L. Papp Jr., of the New Jersey Association of Railroad Passengers. “It’s nothing more than the trans- Hudson tunnel for riders from New Jersey, but nothing else.”

Railroad officials say these huge projects will add extra capacity that will ultimately increase access for riders. And the railroads are trying to keep up to meet emerging demand by reverse commuters and others. By running trains in new directions during slower travel periods, the railroads will also make better use of their resources.

“We are very much engaged in addressing the journey to work for most people, but there are other needs,” said Richard T. Roberts, chief planner for New Jersey Transit. “There are a lot of other things that people travel for, and if you have these huge assets, you can use it at different times of the day.”


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/09/23/nyregion/nyregionspecial2/23commutect.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/09/21/nyregion/routelarge.jpg

TonyO
September 27th, 2007, 10:51 AM
^ Great article. It addresses the spider's web of rail networks and political implications in a way that is not often talked about.

The link from Penn Station to Grand Central is more and more a necessity as I see it.

Transic
October 7th, 2007, 12:32 PM
http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/football/giants/2007/10/07/2007-10-07_jets_giants_unite_for_stadium_marriage.html

http://www.nydailynews.com/img/static/columnists/asset60_myers.jpg Gary Myers

Jets, Giants unite for stadium marriage

Sunday, October 7th 2007, 4:00 AM

The relationship between the Jets and Giants has been competitive, contentious and even childish for more than 40 years in their high-stakes battle to establish football supremacy in New York.

But now they're 50-50 partners and need each other's money to build the $1.3 billion-and-counting stadium under construction in the Giants Stadium parking lot set to open for 2010 season. It's an unusual shotgun marriage of convenience and finances between long-time rivals after the Jets failed in their West Side stadium bid in 2005 and joined the Giants in their project.

"If the West Side stadium had come to fruition and we started building here and the costs got to where they are right now, I think it would have been financial suicide for the two teams," Giants co-owner John Mara said.

The Jets are not worried that a new stadium in an old location with a corporate name will still feel like the Giants' home. It will be dressed up in green on Jets game days and blue on Giants game days. "We want our fans to know that we own the stadium as much as any other team," Jets president Jay Cross said. "It's very important on game day there is not a vestige of the other team."

The teams speak on stadium matters several times a week, and there is a camaraderie that has developed, although it will not carry onto the field for today's crucial game, a matchup that comes just once every four years.

The Giants are the home team for the last regular-season game they will play against each other at Giants Stadium. The next time they play in the regular season will be 2011 with the Jets the home team, finally in a stadium they can call home. But for three hours today, they are rivals again.

"We were happy to have the Giants as partners," Jets owner Woody Johnson said. "It was a very good option for us. They are still a team we have to play and prepare for and we have to beat. Our mandate is very clear."

Mara is sleeping easier with Johnson agreeing to split the stadium bill. The Giants were in the early stages of the project that was estimated at $800 million-$850 million when the Jets didn't get the vote for their stadium in Manhattan. Within days, the Giants called and the teams met in Manhattan.

"I still want to win the game," Mara said. "But if you're asking me, here's your choice: Beat the Jets or beat Dallas, Philadelphia or Washington. I've got to tell you I would take the division game. If you lose this game, you forget about it. By the end of the season, who cares?"


* * *

The Giants were in the midst of a miserable 18-year run of not making the playoffs when high school student John Mara attended Super Bowl III at the Orange Bowl in Miami.

"That was the first Super Bowl I ever went to," he said in his office at Giants Stadium last week.

It was a humiliating day in January of 1969 for the NFL when Joe Namath led the underdog Jets of the AFL to a 16-7 victory over the supposedly invincible Colts in the greatest upset in pro football history. Mara said he doesn't quite remember the reaction of his father Wellington, one of the patriarchs of the established league, to the team across town winning the championship while his proud franchise was floundering.

"But I do remember his reaction to losing the preseason game to the Jets that following summer," he said. "It was not very good."

Although the Jets were the Super Bowl champs and the Giants were coming off a 7-7 season, they didn't become champions of New York football until seven months later when they crushed the Giants, 37-14, in that preseason game at the Yale Bowl in New Haven, their first meeting.

"I remember riding over from Fairfield to New Haven on the team bus, and the tension on that bus before the game was like a playoff game atmosphere," Mara said. "We really wanted to win it. They really wanted to win. They embarrassed us that day. My father was tough to live with for a few days. That was a bitter pill to swallow. We had been kings of New York for so many years."

The Jets hold a 20-18-1 edge in the preseason games and the Giants lead 6-4 in the regular season. Since the Jets won that historic Super Bowl, they have never been back, twice making it to the AFC Championship Game. The Giants have been to three Super Bowls, winning two.

Wellington Mara, who died in 2005, and Jets owner Leon Hess, who died in 1999, were best friends. So when Hess called Mara in 1983 and asked if the Jets could move over to Giants Stadium from Shea Stadium, he was met with no resistance. They were so close that if the Giants were playing a Monday night game, Mara would sit with Hess at the Jets game if they were home that Sunday.

But it was clear the Jets felt like second-class citizens playing at a stadium with another team's name on it, adding to the image that they were the little brother. And with the Jets having to travel from Long Island, every game felt like a road game.

"I can understand that," said Bill Parcells, the only man to coach each team. "It was a little bit of a commute, particularly in the summer, getting back and forth with the traffic. I felt like when I was coaching both teams we had very good support. When I was coaching the Jets, I didn't feel like I was playing on the road. It felt like home."

The Jets tried hard to dress the place in green with bunting and signs. Still, there was the issue of the locker room.

Once the players walk off the field and through the tunnel, the Giants locker room is to the right. The Jets locker room is to the left. Until 2002, the Jets room was actually further down the corridor than the visiting team. "It drove Herm (Edwards) nuts," Cross said. "You had to walk by the visiting team to get to ours."

So, at a cost of $1.5 million, Johnson, who bought the team in 2000, had a state-of-the-art locker room built for the Jets in 2002, situated between the tunnel and the visitor's locker room. "It was a nice gesture to the team," Cross said. "We wanted to stake out some ground to really feel like home."

Parcells, who coached the Jets from 1997-99, never had an issue with the location of the locker room." That's not a big deal for me," he said. "If you are getting beat because of that - it doesn't make any difference."

Also in 2002 the Jets gave the Giants a list of 10 changes they wanted to make to Giants Stadium on game day. One of them was hanging 150-foot by 80-foot Jets banners outside the building on the east and west walls of the stadium. The Giants had no problem as long as the banners were down by Monday.

But the 10th request was a bit unsual. Johnson and the Jets wanted to cover up the two distinctive signs that say "Giants Stadium," that face outside near the top of the stadium, above where the Jets were placing the banners. One sign was visible as the players pulled into their parking lot. The Giants refused.

"That's always something we wanted to do for the Jets fans," Johnson said. "They just didn't agree with that. They were there first. They staked their claim first."

But after a September game that year, the Jets did not take down one of their huge banners. Cross thought it was because they were playing back-to-back home games and it would be a waste of time and money. Others think it might have been in retaliation for the Giants refusing to let them cover up the Giants Stadium sign.

It led to George Zoffinger of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority to say at the time, "I feel like a nanny who is overseeing two billionaires fighting over a sign."

On their weekly news releases, the Jets refuse to acknowledge their games are played at Giants Stadium. It simply says "The Meadowlands."


* * *

The players share the city and often appear at the same events. They party at the same places. Wayne Chrebet and Michael Strahan are good friends. When the teams meet in the preseason, they always play with more intensity.

"Most of their guys were really cool, but there were some that had chips on their shoulders. There was incentive to show who was the real team in New York," said former Giants linebacker Carl Banks, who later worked in the Jets front office under Parcells. "But it was almost as though the Jets were the second team in New York by how they were positioned media-wise. It was kind of weird."

Former Jets defensive end Marty Lyons remembers being at a speaking engagement during his playing days before a group that was pro-Giants. "I actually got introduced and got booed before I went up to speak," he said. "I stood in front of the microphone, opened up my sports jacket and said, 'If you want to judge me because I play for the Jets, that's fine. I have my paycheck in my pocket, so I will leave. Show me the respect I deserve.'"

He was playing in a Jets-Giants offseason basketball game at Wagner College in Staten Island in the '80s when a fight broke out between a few of the younger players. "With all the hype between the Jets and Giants, the players didn't like each other," Lyons said. "A lot of the young players were trying to prove something and got into a fight. When the fight broke out, I sat on the bench. I was thinking, 'You have to be kidding.' With all the young kids in the stands, it was a poor showing by both teams, especially at a charity event."


* * *

Mara was not rooting for the Jets' West Side stadium venture to fail. "At the time, we thought we were going to do this on our own and believed the cost would be significantly less than it is right now," he said. "But certainly, in the back of my mind, if the West Side didn't materialize, it would be great to have them as partners and not compete against them in two separate buildings and also be able to share the costs."

Still, each team had its needs. "It's by definition a little bit inefficient with two of everything," Cross said. "Like Noah's Ark."

The Jets and Giants executives met for two retreats in Westchester to get on the same page.

"You had two different cultures coming at two different points of view," Johnson said. "We had been second fiddle in a stadium named for another team for all these years. Part of the difficulty is we are competitors, but not really competitors in this joint venture."

The Giants' initial plan was to put all the suites on one side of the stadium and the bowl seating on the other. The Jets wanted a traditional setup. The Giants gave in. The suites are starting at $275,000 per year. There are a handful in excess of $1 million per year, which have been sold. Well, at least if you buy in, you get the games for both teams and every event held at the stadium. If the West Side stadium had been approved, the Jets and Giants would have been competing for the same suite dollars.

Initially, the Giants planned to have their offices and locker room at the new stadium, just as it is at Giants Stadium. The Jets had no interest in having their year-round headquarters at the stadium or on site. But fearing they would be 50-50 partners in a building the Giants would be in every day, they objected to the Giants' plan. The Giants audibled, and their new facility will be built in Lots 13 and 17 in the current stadium's parking lot.

"I think in the long run we will be better off," Mara said.

The teams intend to make the new stadium so busy with events, Mara says it will be to the Giants' advantage to be away from the stadium and not "have hundreds of people walking around," as they set up concerts and other events. "It does interfere with your operations," he said.

The Jets are moving their year-round home from Hofstra in Hempstead on Long Island to a new facility in Florham Park in New Jersey. They will move their business offices there in October of 2008 with the team moving in after the '08 season. The Giants and Jets will each have four outdoor practice fields and an indoor field house to practice in bad weather.

The Giants and Jets arranged separate financing to pay for their share. They are working together on naming rights that could be worth as much as $30 million annually. They will make individual decisions on whether to charge season-ticket holders for personal seat licenses (PSLs) to defray the cost of the stadium. The teams were granted $300M through the NFL's G-3 stadium funding plan with the money repaid from the visitor's share of club seat revenue.

Technology will allow the new stadium to look blue for the Giants and green for the Jets on game day. "On Jets day, this stadium will be green as green can be," Johnson said.

Back in the summer of '69, when the Giants and Jets met for the first time at the Yale Bowl, the thought of them becoming partners would have been repulsive. Now they need each other.

millertime83
March 2nd, 2008, 11:13 AM
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3193/2304967660_67572b9df6_b.jpg

JCMAN320
March 2nd, 2008, 03:57 PM
Another great sports venue rises in New Jersey!! The Prudential Center, Meadowlands Stadium, soon to be Red Bull Park, a soccer stadium on par with European stadiums, and the epxnasion of Rutgers Stadium to help propel big time college football in New Jersey!!

Great time to be a sports fan in New Jersey!

Transic
March 22nd, 2008, 12:57 PM
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/22/sports/football/22seat.html?ref=football

Jets and Giants Fans May Pay for the Right to Pay for Tickets

By RICHARD SANDOMIR (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/s/richard_sandomir/index.html?inline=nyt-per)
Published: March 22, 2008

National Football League franchises across the country have helped pay for modern stadiums since the mid-1990s by asking season-ticket holders to ante up for the right to preserve their seat locations in the teams’ new homes.

Now, for the first time, the selling of personal seat licenses is a real possibility in the New York area. Jets (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/sports/profootball/nationalfootballleague/newyorkjets/index.html?inline=nyt-org) and Giants (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/sports/profootball/nationalfootballleague/newyorkgiants/index.html?inline=nyt-org) executives are considering using them at the $1.6 billion stadium they are building in New Jersey, which is scheduled to open in 2010. Although any decisions are months away and team officials are reluctant to discuss details publicly, sports business analysts and others around the N.F.L. said they expected to see the teams sell licenses.

Fans, meanwhile, are bracing to pay extra.

“Listen, I know it’s inevitable,” said Bobby Stiso, a textiles salesman from Airmont, N.Y., who spent nearly three decades on the Giants’ waiting list before buying two season tickets several years ago. “If Wellington Mara (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/m/wellington_mara/index.html?inline=nyt-per) were alive, would he do it?” he said, invoking the name of the team’s patriarch, who was devoted to Giants fans, answering nearly every letter he received from them. He died in 2005.

Personal seat licenses are like taxi medallions or a seat on a financial exchange. Buying one entitles the fan to have first call on the purchase of a season ticket. Fans can re-sell and buy licenses among themselves or online, with the value pegged to the local market and win-loss dynamics.

The initial cost has yet to be determined for the Jets and the Giants, but other teams have charged from $150 for an average seat license to $150,000 for a premium spot in the Dallas Cowboys’ new stadium.

The prospect of selling them is made more likely by the N.F.L.’s requirement that teams repay their debt much faster than their bankers demanded. The credit crisis could also affect the teams if any of their debt has floating rates, which would make their financing more expensive — and make revenue from seat licenses more important.

That league pressure “doesn’t make them inevitable,” said Jay Cross, the Jets’ president. “What it does make inevitable is, we have to raise more equity.”

One option among many is to seek upfront payments from sponsors and companies buying naming rights to the stadium and to the four main gates.

Some Jets and Giants fans have already started worrying about how they will afford license fees. Arnold Spier, an accountant from Fair Lawn, N.J., is paying $3,000 for four upper-deck Jets season tickets and worries that his children’s college costs and rising gas prices may not leave enough to justify buying seat licenses.

“If you asked me now, maybe I’d pay $500,” he said. But, he added: “I don’t care about their financing. Giants Stadium serves my purpose fine.”

Personal seat licenses came into vogue as stadium costs soared, the number of projects multiplied, and city and state governments became less likely to spend tax money to cover the bulk of stadium financing. The Carolina Panthers (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/sports/profootball/nationalfootballleague/carolinapanthers/index.html?inline=nyt-org) started the current trend in 1993 by selling 62,500 seat licenses from $600 to $5,400 each to help pay to build what is now called Bank of America (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/business/companies/bank_of_america_corporation/index.html?inline=nyt-org) Stadium. The Panthers (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/sports/hockey/nationalhockeyleague/floridapanthers/index.html?inline=nyt-org) now sell licenses costing $3,000 to $20,000.

These de facto seat taxes have not surfaced in New York because no new professional stadiums have opened since Giants Stadium in 1976. Sports business experts and fans are convinced that the Jets and the Giants will use seat licenses to repay their debt. Luxury boxes, club seats, naming rights, sponsorships and ticket sales may not be enough.

“I’d be shocked if they didn’t do it,” said Dan Migala, who publishes a sports marketing newsletter. “I can’t imagine in this marketplace that they wouldn’t.”

If they sell licenses, the Jets and the Giants will probably use them on all 9,200 club seats, the premium level below luxury suites. They would then have to decide how many other seats would require licenses.

Mark Lamping, the new chief executive of the two-team stadium, has experience with licenses. As the president of the St. Louis Cardinals (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/sports/baseball/majorleague/stlouiscardinals/index.html?inline=nyt-org), he marketed 10,000 of them at $1,500 to $10,000 to help finance the new Busch Stadium, which opened in 2006.

Until now, the Jets and the Giants have been marketing their new stadium’s 200 luxury boxes, which are being leased at an average price of $600,000 annually. But they have not yet focused on the prices for all the other seats, or on the subject of licenses.

John Mara, the Giants’ president and co-owner, said, “We’re looking at all possibilities for the financing of the stadium.”

Twelve N.F.L. teams have combined to generate nearly $900 million in seat license fees since the mid-1990s. The Green Bay Packers (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/sports/profootball/nationalfootballleague/greenbaypackers/index.html?inline=nyt-org) raised $110 million from 55,000 season-ticket holders to renovate Lambeau Field by selling less valuable versions of licenses called seat user fees. They are generally less expensive ($600 to $1,400) and do not provide seat ownership, but are refundable if fans decline to buy season tickets.

Marketers promote personal seat licenses as valuable real estate and as heightened expressions of fan loyalty, not as instruments that could lead to the loss of season tickets held by families for generations.

“They give fans equity they wouldn’t otherwise have,” said Max Muhleman, a Charlotte-based sports consultant who has devised or consulted on numerous N.F.L. seat license plans. “They’re not stockholders in the team. But they own the seat, and that’s worth a lot.”

Until the Cowboys introduced dramatically higher prices for their stadium, which is scheduled to open in 2009, teams initially sold their licenses for a few hundred dollars to $10,000.

The Cowboys are marketing their high-end seats as a luxury product, pricing club seat licenses at $16,000, $35,000 and $50,000, before leaping to $100,000 and $150,000 each.

“It was an internal feeling that that was what the market could bear,” said Greg McElroy, the Cowboys’ senior vice president for sales and marketing. In less than four months, more than half the team’s licenses have been sold.

Several years ago, the Philadelphia Eagles (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/sports/profootball/nationalfootballleague/philadelphiaeagles/index.html?inline=nyt-org) sold 29,000 seat licenses for $1,800 to $3,700, raising $70 million toward the costs for Lincoln Financial Field. By contrast, the Cowboys could raise as much as $300 million.

Among the New York region’s other teams involved in major construction projects, the Yankees (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/sports/baseball/majorleague/newyorkyankees/index.html?inline=nyt-org) and the Mets (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/sports/baseball/majorleague/newyorkmets/index.html?inline=nyt-org) said they would not use licenses in their ballparks, and the Devils (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/sports/hockey/nationalhockeyleague/newjerseydevils/index.html?inline=nyt-org) did not use them in building the Prudential Center.

Seat licenses have become a marketable commodity. They are sold privately and listed on Web sites like eBay (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/business/companies/ebay_inc/index.html?inline=nyt-org), Craigslist and seasonticketrights.com (http://seasonticketrights.com/), where fans attempt to flip their licenses at a profit.

The Chicago Bears’ fairly conservative license plan, with a top price of $10,000, may be a model for the Giants and the Jets. The Bears originally sold licenses to 45 percent of their season-ticket holders at the new Soldier Field, so most of the others kept their seats without paying the extra fees.

Then some unaffected fans successfully lobbied the Bears to sell them licenses on their seats. Now, seasonticketrights.com shows that the average gain on the sale of a Bears license is about $8,300.

Kyle Burks, who created seasonticketrights.com, said: “It’s tough to tell someone who’s paid for their season-ticket rights for 30 years that you have to pay even more. It’s as much an emotional decision as it is a financial one.”

Chris Clarke, an account manager for Checkpoint Systems from Tinton Falls, N.J., faces such a decision. He owns six Jets season tickets and is part of a friends-and-family entourage that owns 38 season tickets.

If the new stadium has personal seat licenses, he said, “you’ll chase people like me out, or force us to decide, I can’t do six, maybe it will be two.”

But others, like John Moss of Roseland, N.J., will hold on to their tickets almost regardless of price. He has four $80 field-level end zone Giants tickets that would probably be designated for seat licenses.

“I’m going to buy my tickets whether there are licenses or not,” Moss said. “Do I want to pay? No. Maybe it will be $1,000 a seat, but anything over $5,000 will be a lot. I think the Mara family will be just and fair.”

Peter Quennell
March 26th, 2008, 11:34 AM
Good morning everyone. New shots here - click on them for larger images in pdf format:

http://galaxyrising.com/ee/index.php?/trifecta/comments/meadowlands_stadium_gets_first_seating_and_whats_n ew_more_steel/

It's easy to get close-up on Sundays. You can get great distance shots from the intersection of Patterson Plank Road and Route 17.

A real pity that there's no construction website with weekly "official" shots and also no fan forum.

The Yankees and Mets construction sites are real studies in how to do those things. The Devils one was excellent too. (And as for the Nets...?!?!)

Maybe someone here can suggest how to inspire one?

The stadium is of course just several hundred yards from the increasingly weird Xanadu. Shots of that here:

http://galaxyrising.com/ee/index.php?/trifecta/comments/xanadu_look_emerges_big_reaction_now_to_the_tacky_ eyesore/

Can the teams be happy about that? NJSEA hearing is at 10 tomorrow Thursday; maybe we'll find out.

Jim856796
July 6th, 2008, 02:59 PM
I don't know the reason why Giants Stadium is being reing replaced, other than the fact that it is shared by two NFL teams. It just looked like an ideal football venue since it was retangular.

NYatKNIGHT
July 8th, 2008, 02:40 PM
More corporate boxes.

STT757
August 7th, 2008, 01:58 PM
I hope Brett is with the Jets to open the new stadium.

STT757
September 1st, 2008, 08:30 PM
N.F.L. ROUNDUP

Negotiations With Allianz on Naming of Stadium

By RICHARD SANDOMIR and JOSHUA ROBINSON
Published: August 31, 2008
The Jets and the Giants are negotiating with Allianz, the German-based financial services giant, to buy the naming rights to their new stadium, said a person with knowledge of the talks.

If the deal is completed, it will probably be for at least 30 years and for an estimated $25 million or more annually, which the teams would split.

At that price, the fee would exceed the $20 million that Citigroup will pay the Mets annually for the name Citi Field and that Barclays will spend on the Nets’ proposed arena near downtown Brooklyn.

Allianz, with interests in insurance, asset management and banking, has its name on the arena that is home to Bayern Munich, the soccer team in the Bundesliga, and is a sponsor of Formula One racing.

The teams and Allianz had no comment on the negotiations.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/01/sports/football/01nfl.html?ref=sports

lofter1
September 1st, 2008, 08:44 PM
Hmmm ...

The GERMAN GIANTS!

Got a ring to it :cool:

("germs" for short)

NYC4Life
September 2nd, 2008, 01:47 PM
I hope Brett is with the Jets to open the new stadium.

He probably won't see a Super Bowl in the new stadium.

STT757
September 3rd, 2008, 12:59 AM
He probably won't see a Super Bowl in the new stadium.

Not without a roof.

JCMAN320
September 10th, 2008, 11:58 PM
Giants, Jets in talks with German firm for stadium naming rights

by Maura McDermott/The Star-Ledger
Wednesday September 10, 2008, 7:16 PM

The Giants and Jets are negotiating with a German financial titan for what could be a record-breaking sponsorship deal at the new Meadowlands stadium.

The naming rights deal with Allianz would put $25 million to $30 million a year in the teams' pockets for the next 10 to 20 years, said two people close to the negotiations who requested anonymity because the talks are confidential.

Allianz also had strong ties to the Nazis during World War II, providing insurance to death camps such as Auschwitz and denying payments to Jewish clients, instead allowing the German government to collect the funds.

The firm's past could evoke strong reactions, especially among Holocaust survivors and their families, but it has made efforts to atone for its crimes, according to Jewish leaders.

"Allianz has a history, and not a very noble history," said Rabbi Andrew Baker, director of international Jewish affairs for the American Jewish Committee.

But "based on what Allianz has done to address its history it should be no more and no less entitled to such a designation than any other company," Baker said.

Allianz participates in the International Commission on Holocaust Era Insurance Claims, which has paid about $300 million to some 50,000 individuals, among other restitution programs, said Peter Lefkin, a spokesman for Allianz.

"We've undertaken so many initiatives over the last 60 years to redress the terrible evils of the Third Reich regime," Lefkin said.

The firm faced class action lawsuits by Holocaust victims and pressure from the U.S. government, but "what motivated us most was not pressure, but it was truly a desire to redress the wrongs" committed by Allianz during the Nazi era, Lefkin said.

Alice McGillion, a spokeswoman for the Giants and Jets, said the teams' researchers "found that Holocaust experts, former government officials and leading Jewish and survivor groups believe that Allianz has made determined efforts towards restitution and continues to do so today."

Carl Goldberg, chairman of the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, which owns the land where the stadium is being built, said he understands that not everyone would welcome Allianz as a stadium sponsor.

"For members of the Jewish faith, this is always a very personal kind of decision," said Goldberg, who is Jewish. "I remember when I was a child my father came to the conclusion that it was not appropriate for our family to buy a German car. But that was in the 1960s. Now it's 2008."

The Tisch family, which co-owns the Giants, is "hugely invested in Jewish philanthropy, not only in the United States but around the world, and they're very sensitive to these kinds of issues," Goldberg said.

The sports authority can bar a naming rights deal with an alcohol or tobacco company or a firm of "questionable repute," but Allianz does not qualify as such a firm, Goldberg said.

Munich-based Allianz, the world's largest insurer, with $125 billion in revenues and 167,000 employees already sponsors a PGA tournament in Boca Raton, Fla., as well as Formula 1 and an arena in Munich.

Negotiations with the Giants and Jets was first reported by The New York Times.

JCMAN320
September 12th, 2008, 05:22 PM
Giants, Jets sever talks with German firm for stadium naming rights

by The Associated Press Friday September 12, 2008, 1:40 PM

The Giants and Jets have broken off stadium naming rights negotiations with a German financial titan that sold insurance to Nazis death camps during World War II.

The naming rights deal with Allianz would have put $25 million to $30 million a year in the teams' pockets for the next 10 to 20 years.

But the deal had drawn criticism because of the company's strong ties to the Nazis during World War II. It provided insurance to death camps such as Auschwitz and denied payments to Jewish clients, instead allowing the German government to collect the funds.

TREPYE
October 2nd, 2008, 10:51 PM
Other teams take some pride in their stadiums....

http://www.hotelplanner.com/Common/Images/Landmarks/4561.jpg


Us here....


http://img77.imageshack.us/img77/2610/birdseyemr9.jpg

What a pathetic, pathetic piece of architecture. I mean did they really have to model it after a central air conditioner vent. Just to think that Giant fans are going to have to foot the bill for this pile....ugh

Alonzo-ny
October 3rd, 2008, 04:52 AM
At least the old stadium has its character.

66nexus
October 3rd, 2008, 01:53 PM
Giants, Jets sever talks with German firm for stadium naming rights

by The Associated Press Friday September 12, 2008, 1:40 PM

The Giants and Jets have broken off stadium naming rights negotiations with a German financial titan that sold insurance to Nazis death camps during World War II.

The naming rights deal with Allianz would have put $25 million to $30 million a year in the teams' pockets for the next 10 to 20 years.

But the deal had drawn criticism because of the company's strong ties to the Nazis during World War II. It provided insurance to death camps such as Auschwitz and denied payments to Jewish clients, instead allowing the German government to collect the funds.

I honestly hope that the Nazi thing isn't the reason. Because in that case, don't buy any Mitsubishi-made product because the first Mitsubishi introduction to the US were the Japanese zero warplanes at Pearl Harbor...

I don't think that stadium would have ever been allowed to be so ugly had it been built in NY. The Meadowlands are on a roll with the Xanadu and this stadium.

JCMAN320
October 3rd, 2008, 04:43 PM
I don't think it has to do with it being NY or NJ 66nexus, and just what was selected from architects and renderings by the owners of the Giants and Jets.

66nexus
October 3rd, 2008, 06:11 PM
I don't think it has to do with it being NY or NJ 66nexus, and just what was selected from architects and renderings by the owners of the Giants and Jets.

It's like when JC went against Goldman Sach's over the 781ft tower, because GS wanted to put their name at the top.

Regions don't always have to take what developers/architects throw at them.

ItstheBeat
October 3rd, 2008, 09:53 PM
^
Is that why we have a handsome 781 ft tower on the western shore of the hudson with absolutely no architectural lighting for its crown.
GS was pissed about not having its name on it and now we have a blacked out crown? Did they really want their name up there? doesn't sound like something they'd be in favor of.
I doubt their new headquarters downtown will have signage on top.

JCMAN320
October 4th, 2008, 12:11 AM
Your right 66nexus but the owners of the Giants and Jets chose the design not the state so much.

Itsthebeat, the crown is not lit up because GST was u/c during 9/11, so they shortened the tower and decided not to light it up so it wouldn't be a target. I think it might get lit up soon however, I saw the lowe levels of the crown with lights on facing the Hudson when I was in BPC. So it might get done, later than sooner, but might get done.

66nexus
October 4th, 2008, 12:41 AM
^
Is that why we have a handsome 781 ft tower on the western shore of the hudson with absolutely no architectural lighting for its crown.
GS was pissed about not having its name on it and now we have a blacked out crown? Did they really want their name up there? doesn't sound like something they'd be in favor of.
I doubt their new headquarters downtown will have signage on top.

Who is to say that their final intentions included a lit crown? (perhaps they even felt it would undermine their new NYC tower...)

Take the backlash of reviews of the Xanadu design. This excerpt is from an article posted by JCMan not too long ago:

Sports authority demanding a review of Xanadu appearance

by Maura McDermott/The Star-Ledger Tuesday March 18, 2008, 4:04 PM

Responding to complaints about the look of the Xanadu complex rising in the Meadowlands, the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority is demanding a show-and-tell by the project's architects.

The authority's board "has widespread concern with the current appearance" of Xanadu, and expects a presentation by the project's architects at a public meeting on March 27, according to a letter from Carl Goldberg, chair of the board, to Larry Siegel, president of Meadowlands Xanadu.

Local residents and officials have complained about the project's blue-and-orange exterior, with state Senate President Richard Codey calling it "yucky-looking."

The developers also must submit plans for the proposed Pepsi-branded Ferris wheel, Goldberg wrote. The nearly 300-foot wheel would bear a 150-foot, electronic Pepsi sign, according to a $100 million sponsorship deal reached by developers and the soft-drink company.

However, the Pepsi deal cannot go forward unless the authority approves the design of the wheel and the sponsorship terms, Goldberg said today.

"We'll deal with the Ferris wheel and the sponsorship of the Ferris wheel as we've dealt with every other aspect of the project, with a thorough and complete review to make sure it's consistent with the original conceptual presentation," he said.

The $2 billion, two million-square-foot Xanadu retail and entertainment complex is expected to open in November. It is funded by Colony Capital, a private equity firm.

Richard Edmonds, a spokesman for the developer expressed confidence in the project's design today.

"Beauty is in the eye of the beholder," Edmonds said. "There were probably people who thought the Eiffel Tower was really ugly when it was being built. We love the design. Plus, it's a work in progress."

JCMAN320
October 4th, 2008, 01:25 AM
66nexus, they had rendering showing it when they first designed it, long before there was a plan to built a NYC tower, when they wanted JC as their HQ.

STT757
March 11th, 2009, 12:53 AM
Some new construction progress photos of the new NJ Transit station being built next to the new Meadowlands stadium.

http://www.railfanwindow.com/gallery2/v/TempByDate/2009-03-10/

Also in related news the MTA has announced that on Game days the MTA will run trains direct from the New Haven line to Secaucus station in New Jersey where fans will transfer to the NJ Transit train to the stadium.

http://mta.info/mta/sports/

Schedules

http://mta.info/mta/sports/meadow_final.pdf

This is really cool, a one seat ride from Connecticut to New Jersey for Jets/Giants games.

Alonzo-ny
March 11th, 2009, 09:17 AM
Didnt you just say you need to connect with NJTransit? and therefore not one seat.

STT757
March 11th, 2009, 11:00 AM
Didnt you just say you need to connect with NJTransit? and therefore not one seat.

Read what I wrote,


a one seat ride from Connecticut to New Jersey for Jets/Giants games.

It's a one seat ride on Metro North to New Jersey which is a big deal, I didn't write it's a one seat ride to the Meadowlands rather it's a one seat ride to New Jersey. Through service to New Jersey by Metro North.

Bronxbombers
March 11th, 2009, 03:29 PM
I will go to the new Stadium one time for 1 New York Giants football game. I also will got the new Stadium for 1 New York Red Bulls soccer game.

Marv95
March 11th, 2009, 04:32 PM
Red Bulls won't be in the new Giants Stadium.

JCMAN320
March 12th, 2009, 01:20 AM
You'll have to take the PATH to Harrison to get to the new Red Bulls Arena.

STT757
June 12th, 2009, 11:06 AM
The new NJ Transit rail link and station are almost complete, it should be open by late July. Also some new stadium photos from recent press tours;

http://leadernewspapers.net/modules.php?name=News&file=comments&sid=10547&op=Reply&pid=

http://www.nj.com/giants/index.ssf/2009/06/new_meadowlands_stadium_showca.html

Alonzo-ny
June 12th, 2009, 11:16 AM
Stadiums seem to get built like rockets.

Bronxbombers
June 12th, 2009, 07:32 PM
Stadiums sure do seem to get built like rockets.

STT757
June 14th, 2009, 06:16 PM
From the outside the new stadium dwarfs the current Giant's Stadium.

Alonzo-ny
June 14th, 2009, 06:41 PM
How many seats in the new stadium?

JCMAN320
June 14th, 2009, 07:36 PM
New Meadowlands Stadium will hold 82,500; it will be the second largest capacity in the NFL after the homefield of the Redskins, FedEx Field, 90,000, in D.C.

Giants Stadium currently holds 78,741

Bronxbombers
June 14th, 2009, 09:40 PM
I will go to the new Meadowlands Stadium and Giants Stadium but not alone.

STT757
June 14th, 2009, 10:53 PM
I will go to the new Meadowlands Stadium and Giants Stadium but not alone.

BrooklynLove will go with you.

ASchwarz
June 15th, 2009, 01:37 PM
From the outside the new stadium dwarfs the current Giant's Stadium.

It should. While the seating isn't much different, the new stadium's floor space is about twice the old stadium.

It's among the 2 or 3 largest stadia on earth by floor area.

TonyO
July 9th, 2009, 08:46 AM
NJ.com

NJ Transit announces new rail line from Hoboken to Giants Stadium

by Paul
Wednesday July 08, 2009, 12:25 PM

NJ Transit announced today a new rail service to Giants Stadium via Hoboken Terminal and Secaucus Junction.

The rail service will launch on Sunday, July 26, for the 2009 CONCACAF Gold Cup Final title soccer match to be played at the Meadowlands Sports Complex that day.

Trains will operate initially for select stadium events of 50,000 fans or more. This includes all Giants and Jets pre-season and regular season home games, major concerts at Giants Stadium and Gold Cup soccer matches.

Trains will operate between Hoboken Terminal, Secaucus Junction and Meadowlands Sports Complex stations approximately every 10 to 20 minutes beginning 3 1/2 hours before and up to two hours after events.

NJ Transit will announce daily service schedules at a later date.

For events with fewer than 50,000 fans in attendance, NJ Transit will continue to operate the shuttle bus service between Secaucus Junction and Giants Stadium.

ZippyTheChimp
August 18th, 2009, 02:12 PM
^
Used this service last night for the Giants-Carolina game. Excellent.

Gonna miss the old place, so trying to get to as many games as possible.

Last I heard, the new stadium will be called Meadowlands Stadium.

NYatKNIGHT
August 18th, 2009, 02:15 PM
I can live with that.

TREPYE
September 22nd, 2009, 12:32 PM
How is it that in TX they are building a stadium with 20% more capacity more amenities, some architectural flare and overthe top TV screens yet they payed 30% less for their stadium. From what it seems too the new Meadowlands stadium will not include standing room for the fans, which is a nice gesture by Jerry to his less well-off fans.

As much as I detest the Cowboys per their front running fans and that cheap-shot artist team of theirs, I gotta give the owner credit for evoking a little more achitectural pride into their stadium and giving more of their fans the opportunity to see the games.

I think that this stadium is gonna be the new emblem for bad sports venue architecture (a la Shea Stadium):rolleyes:

At this point I'd even venture to say that its outdated; even before its construction is done...

arcman210
September 22nd, 2009, 05:03 PM
Meadowlands Stadium and Cowboys Stadium are indeed vastly different, but I think its too soon to jump to any conclusions as to which is a better stadium.

Meadowlands Stadium actually seats 2,500 more spectators than Cowboys Stadium... the standing room tickets for Cowboys stadium did not even allow the patrons to see the field, as they had to watch the game from the screen inside or out on the plaza. Jerry Jones even said standing room was a temporary or game by game thing.

A comparison to Shea Stadium is far fetched... as Shea was a multi purpose cookie cutter stadium neither suited for football nor baseball. Meadowlands Stadium is actually going in a different direction from many of the recently constructed stadiums in the NFL in that it is a complete bowl. Many new stadiums, including Cowboys Stadium, eliminated endzone seating in favor of exterior views... which eliminates a crowd loudness factor which is actually a large homefield advantage in football.

The ammenities at Meadowlands Stadium are yet to be seen. Though it many not have the flair or flashiness of Cowboys Stadium, it will surely be one of the best NFL stadiums to watch a game.

ZippyTheChimp
September 22nd, 2009, 05:29 PM
Were those caged pole dancers I saw up in the rafters?

Dallas has plenty of it. you really don't need to go to an NFL game to get it. I've heard some observations by reporters and players the last few days that the crowd wasn't very noisy. If you can't get it going for a home opener in a brand new stadium against a hated rival...

Amenities are great, but they shouldn't be distractions. You don't want to get rid of the "Dog Pound" aspect of the crowd.

ASchwarz
September 22nd, 2009, 05:48 PM
How is it that in TX they are building a stadium with 20% more capacity more amenities, some architectural flare and overthe top TV screens yet they payed 30% less for their stadium. From what it seems too the new Meadowlands stadium will not include standing room for the fans, which is a nice gesture by Jerry to his less well-off fans.

Meadowlands Stadium is bigger than Cowboys Stadium. They only seat 80,000 in Cowboys Stadium.

The other Dallas "attendance" is in the parking lot, watching video screens. If you think it's so "nice" of J. Jones to charge folks to stand in a parking lot and watch a video screen, then be my guest.

As alluded to by Arcman, one major reason that Meadowlands Stadium is so expensive is beacuse it's a full bowl. They don't have this in Dallas.

As to which is better, why don't you actually wait until Meadowlands Stadium is finished before making comparisons?

TREPYE
September 24th, 2009, 12:13 AM
Yes I should wait till the stadium is finished before I get all critical. I know that so far the outside of it looks hideous and surprizingly ugly. But the standing room only access for the new CB stadium in not just in the outdoors as you mention; these position include views of the field.



http://www.dallascowboys.com/images/partypass_660.jpg






http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_9p2VQR4aaN8/SprdaFg2k1I/AAAAAAAABO0/V-uCjBfTkZs/s320/P1010014.JPG



I have seen no mention of such space at the new stadium. I do think that the 20,000 extra is a bit much and it is unlikely that all of em had views of the field, but at least it is an option. Football games in NYC sell out like crazy and tix are usually cost prohibitive because of this, thus perhaps a few thousand more tix (no not 20,000 more) in the form of standing room would be a nice gesture to the fans on the part of the Giants and Jets.

JCMAN320
October 22nd, 2009, 08:15 PM
PepsiCo signs on as partner at new Meadowlands stadium

By Star-Ledger Wire Services
October 22, 2009, 1:12PM

http://media.nj.com/business_impact/photo/meadowlandsjpg-a88b1b7d2332b871_large.jpg
An artist's rendering of the New Meadowlands Stadium being built in East Rutherford.

[/b]EAST RUTHERFORD --[/b] PepsiCo signed an agreement to become the fourth cornerstone partner for the new stadium for the Jets and Giants.

The New Meadowlands Stadium Corporation announced the multiyear deal today. No contract deals immediately available.

MetLife, Verizon and Budweiser had previously signed contracts to be cornerstone partners for the $1.6 billion stadium that is scheduled to open next spring with a concert by Bon Jovi. The first NFL game will be played in the summer.

The teams are still looking to sell the naming rights to the new stadium, which is being constructed next to Giants Stadium.

PepsiCo offers the world's largest portfolio of food and beverage brands.

The deal will begin at the start of the 2010 season. It will give the company beverage exclusivity at the stadium for all non-alcoholic beverages. Pepsi and Gatorade will continue to be the official soft drink and sports drink of the teams.

"We have enjoyed great partnerships with the Jets and Giants over the years and now we're taking it to the next level by joining them in their new state-of-the-art facility," said Jeff Dubiel, Pepsi's vice president of sports marketing. "With the stadium essentially in our backyard, we've seen firsthand the incredible excitement and anticipation it's bringing to the New York area."

As a cornerstone sponsor, PepsiCo will receive exterior branding on the stadium's facade, signage throughout the concourses, and in-stadium branding.

"In what is a challenging time economically, the fact that we have attracted four major corporate sponsors for the stadium is significant," said Mark Lamping, president and chief executive officer of New Meadowlands Stadium Co.

Gatorade has been the sports drink of the Jets and the Giants players for more than 25 years. Pepsi has been the official soft drink of the NFL since 2002, the Giants since 2003 and the Jets since 2004.

arcman210
November 18th, 2009, 01:58 PM
looking pretty sweet

JCMAN320
November 18th, 2009, 06:57 PM
Nice!!! The new place looks great so far!!!

arcman210
December 17th, 2009, 02:34 PM
source: http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/football/2009/12/17/2009-12-17_jets_giants_will_submit_proposal.html

Jets, Giants will bid to host 2014 Super Bowl at new stadium

BY Gary Myers
DAILY NEWS SPORTS WRITER



The NFL has given the Giants and Jets approval to bid for Super Bowl XLVIII following the 2013 season to be played in their new $1.7 billion stadium that opens next season.

It will take a lot of convincing when NFL owners vote because the league has always required a minimum temperature of 50 degrees or a domed stadium to host the game. The winning bid will be announced at the end of May.

The teams elected not to put a dome - retractable or permanent on the new facility - because of the prohibitive cost. The bid would be a "unique, once-only circumstance based on the opportunity to celebrate the new stadium and the great heritage and history of the NFL in the New York region," according to a statement from the new stadium's management.

The Super Bowl will be in Miami following this season, then the game will be played in the new stadiums in Arlington, Tex., and Indianapolis, the following two years. Each of those stadium have retractable roofs. Then it will be in the Superdome in New Orlans.

There has never been a cold weather Super Bowl played without a dome. The game has been played in domes in Detroit twice and Minneapolis once.

According to the statement, a preliminary proposal to the NFL is due April 1, with the winning bid announced at the end of May. Three other venues have expressed their intention to compete for the hosting rights.

"It's time for the biggest game in football to be played on the biggest stage in the world," said Woody Johnson and Jonathan Tisch, the committee chairmen. "We are confident that the appeal and prestige of the New York City metropolitan region, coupled with the innovative capabilities of our brand-new state-of-the-art facility, can provide a unique and exciting experience for the teams and fans, as well as the entire league and the sport of football. And, of course, we would love to bring the Super Bowl - and its significant economic benefits - to New York and northern New Jersey."

There has been some support for placing the Super Bowl in Giants Stadium following the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks to show support for New York, but that never gained much momentum.

lofter1
December 17th, 2009, 08:20 PM
... the league has always required a minimum temperature of 50 degrees or a domed stadium to host the game.


It's a manly game.

STT757
February 6th, 2010, 01:49 PM
NFL commissioner Roger Goodell favors Jets, Giants new Meadowlands home as site of 2014 Super Bowl

http://assets.nydailynews.com/img/2010/02/06/gal_backpage_0206.jpg


FORT LAUDERDALE - Commissioner Roger Goodell clearly supports awarding Super Bowl XLVIII to the Giants' and Jets' new stadium in 2014, and Patriots owner Robert Kraft will lobby other owners for it, but Steelers owner Dan Rooney has a big problem with playing the most important game of the year in potentially cold and nasty weather.

The vote comes May 24-26 in Dallas. The lobbying starts now.

There is really just one concern for a Super Bowl on Broadway: The weather, obviously.

"I hope it's there, I hope it snows and I hope the Patriots are in the game," Kraft, one the NFL's most influential owners, said Friday. "I think there is some real support for it. I know I personally will lobby anyone I can."

If the Giants and Jets had splurged for another $400 million-$500 million on top of the $1.7 billion they are spending on the new stadium that opens this year, then the vote may have been unanimous because the NFL has a history of rewarding owners who spend their own money and/or cities who help fund the construction of new stadiums with a Super Bowl.

Even though the new Giants-Jets Stadium will have no roof, Goodell gave every indication he's on board. Even though he doesn't have a vote and says he must remain neutral, his endorsement may be the deciding factor.

"I think there are real benefits to the league considering this as an option," Goodell said Friday during his annual state of the league address at the Super Bowl.

"I think the idea of playing in the elements is central to the way the game of football is played. I think being able to do that and celebrate the game of football in the No. 1 market could have tremendous benefits to the league going forward. I think you will see that - I think our two co-chairmen are here, Woody Johnson and Jon Tisch - they will put together a very aggressive bid, one that will demonstrate the value of playing in New York and they will be competing against some great cities also. It will be an interesting vote, but I will stand on the sidelines and watch."

The NFL waived its cold-weather restriction by allowing the Giants and Jets to make a bid. Allowing it to get this far is an indication there is an awful lot of support. Miami, which is hosting its record 10th Super Bowl Sunday, Glendale, Ariz., and either Tampa or Houston are the competition. Here's how the voting works. If one of the four cities does not get 75% of the vote (24 of the 32 owners) on the first ballot, then the city with the lowest vote is out. The same procedure is used for the second ballot. Then, if there is still no winner, the two remaining cities go head-to-head, with the winner decided by simple majority. "I'm personally a big supporter of having the Super Bowl in the new stadium and in New York," Kraft said. "It doesn't matter what the weather is, in my opinion. It's just a great place. A great boost for the city."

The game would be this weekend in four years, or potentially one or two weeks later depending on whether the regular season is expanded to 17 or 18 games. And with this weekend's forecast for snow, a snowy weekend in 2014 is obviously a possibility.Rooney, who is now the United States ambassador to Ireland, says his son Art has his team's vote, but he thinks the weather is a major concern. "Are they going to put a roof on it?" Rooney said.

No, he was told.

"Then they are going to have some trouble," he said. "There are a lot of people who think we should be in a warm climate all the time. The weather would be something you would have to consider."

But some of the most memorable NFL playoff games have been played in adverse conditions: the Ice Bowl game between Dallas and Green Bay; the Snow Bowl game between Oakland and New England and the Inhumanely Frigid Bowl between the Giants and Packers two years ago in minus-23 wind chill.

All great games. "That is true," Rooney said. "It's still cold."

Rooney wouldn't say how the Steelers would ultimately vote. One thing to keep in mind: The Rooney and Mara families are extraordinarily close.

"I am cautiously optimistic that the bid will be viewed by the owners as something exciting and different," Tisch said. "There is an understanding that this is a game that is played in all kinds of weather. It's the history of the game that should be taken into consideration when you think about the game at the new Giants-Jets stadium."


http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/football/2010/02/06/2010-02-06_commish_has_a_super_wish.html

lofter1
September 8th, 2010, 10:57 AM
As Stadiums Vanish, Their Debt Lives On

NY TIMES (http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/08/sports/08stadium.html?ref=sports)
By KEN BELSON
September 7, 2010

It’s the gift that keeps on taking. The old Giants Stadium, demolished to make way for New Meadowlands Stadium (http://www.newmeadowlandsstadium.com/), still carries about $110 million in debt, or nearly $13 for every New Jersey resident, even though it is now a parking lot.

The financial hole was dug over decades by politicians who passed along the cost of building and fixing the stadium, and it is getting deeper. With the razing of the old stadium and the Giantsand the Jets moving into their splashy new home next door, a big source of revenue to pay down the debt has shriveled.

New Jerseyans are hardly alone in paying for stadiums that no longer exist. Residents of Seattle’s King County owe more than $80 million for the Kingdome, which was razed in 2000. The story has been similar in Indianapolis and Philadelphia. In Houston, Kansas City, Mo., Memphis and Pittsburgh, residents are paying for stadiums and arenas that were abandoned by the teams they were built for.

But befitting its name, Giants Stadium is the granddaddy of phantom facilities. Taxpayers in New Jersey, already under pressure from declining local government revenues, this year will pay $35.8 million in principal and interest on the $266 million in remaining bonds for the Meadowlands Sports Complex, which opened in 1976 and includes the Izod Center and a horse racing track. Those bonds will not be paid until 2025.

For its first decade, the complex was a success. But its fortunes faded as horse racing declined, the Nets and the Devils left for Newark, and the Jets and the Giants built their own $1.6 billion stadium next door, which will host its first National Football League regular-season game Sunday.

To offset its declining revenue, the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, which runs the sports complex but not the New Meadowlands Stadium, expanded instead of contracting: building aquariums, convention centers and other facilities, issuing hundreds of millions of dollars in additional bonds.

How municipalities acquire so much debt on buildings that have been torn down or are underused illustrates the excesses of publicly financed stadiums and the almost mystical sway professional sports teams have over politicians, voters and fans.

Rather than confront teams, they have often buckled when owners — usually threatening to move — have demanded that the public pay for new suites, parking or arenas and stadiums.

With state and local budgets stretched by the recession, politicians are only now starting to look askance at privately held teams trying to tap the public till.

“The Meadowlands wasn’t a bad idea, but rather than pay it off, they let it ride,” said Steven Malanga, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, who has written about the perils of publicly financed stadiums. “Politicians essentially turned a good thing into a money loser for taxpayers at exactly the wrong time.”

Paying for arenas and stadiums that are now gone or empty is a result of a trend that stretches back decades. Until the 1960s, public works were often defined as bridges, roads, sewers and so on: basic infrastructure that was used by all and was unlikely to be built by the private sector. With few exceptions, like County Stadium in Milwaukee, teams constructed their own stadiums.

As pro sports expanded into cities from coast to coast, politicians and business leaders pushed for taxpayer-financed stadiums to lure teams. To name a few, New York built Shea Stadium for the expansion Mets, Atlanta put up Fulton County Stadium to lure the Braves from Milwaukee, and Oakland built a stadium to entice the Athletics to move from Kansas City, Mo.

Soon after, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh and Cincinnati built stadiums for teams already there. In some cases, cities justified the expense as a way to keep owners from moving their teams. In other cases, politicians argued that the stadiums would generate enough revenue to cover the construction cost.

Competing With New York

Politicians and business leaders in New Jersey made the same claims when they created the sports complex in the Meadowlands, with a few twists. For one, they viewed the project as a way to compete with New York, which cast a long shadow in the region. Persuading the Mara family to move the Giants to New Jersey was a coup for the state, even if the team still keeps New York in its name.

But while other cities raised or introduced taxes to pay for their stadiums, the project’s chief cheerleader, Gov. William T. Cahill, promised that the racetrack would pay for itself and Giants Stadium, and that taxpayers would not be liable. In effect, the state gambled on gambling.

To ensure that there was enough money, the racetrack in the Meadowlands was allowed to keep 12 percent of each dollar bet as opposed to 5 percent at other tracks in New Jersey. That way, more cash would be available for other building projects and any excess would be sent to the state.

But Moody’s Investors Service was skeptical that a racetrack in the Meadowlands could generate enough money to pay for the $300 million in bonds the Sports and Exposition Authority wanted to issue. In a report issued in 1974, Moody’s said that “the market for wagering in the New York metropolitan area” is “already heavily catered to.”

Fearful that their sports empire would not be built, lawmakers in New Jersey grudgingly gave their “moral pledge” to back the bonds.

Early Success

At first, the sports complex boomed. Pegasus, the restaurant atop the racetrack, was an instant hit. The Giants sold out regularly despite mediocre teams. The authority covered its interest and principal payments and sent $60 million in profits to the state in its first six years.

State-sponsored authorities that can raise money by issuing bonds are often formed to create projects that politicians are unable or unwilling to create themselves. But they often become victims of their own success, and the authority in the Meadowlands was no different.

“Initially, the complex had a strong economic rationale,” said James W. Hughes, the dean of the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers University. “But this being New Jersey, they couldn’t leave well enough alone. All of a sudden, what had been a net revenue producer gradually slipped into the red.”

In 1981, as a recession eroded profits at the track, the authority built an arena that cost about $85 million, nearly twice as much as expected. The authority received a boost when the Jets moved to the Meadowlands and the short-lived United States Football League played at Giants Stadium in the middle of the 1980s.

But the casinos in Atlantic City, off-track betting in New York and state-run lotteries continued to chip away at the racetrack’s take, which accounted for the bulk of the authority’s income.

“By the 1980s, people realized competition had become keen for gaming,” said Jon F. Hanson, who was the chairman of the Sports and Exposition Authority for most of that decade. Eager for new revenue, he and the authority tried to build a new stadium to lure the Yankees to New Jersey. But the authority still had $356 million in bonds to pay off, and its main source of income was under attack. From 1987 to 1989, attendance at the racetrack fell 12 percent, or about $10 million less in profits.

So, the authority asked lawmakers to return the $60 million in profits it had sent to Trenton, a request that was denied. Voters rejected a proposal to issue $185 million in stadium bonds. Charles L. Hardwick, the speaker of the Assembly at the time, said the authority needed “better long-term planning and a cost-cutting program, not a massive infusion of state money, in order to maintain good financial health.”

Mandate Expanded

Hand-wringing aside, lawmakers in New Jersey have used the authority when it has suited their needs, as a source of jobs for their constituents or as a developer of projects like the renovation of the football stadium at Rutgers University and the construction of an aquarium in Camden, a two-hour drive from the Meadowlands.

By expanding the authority’s portfolio, though, they further strained its finances. So in 1992, the state began taking the authority’s debts onto its balance sheet. Because the state has retired and refinanced most of the authority’s bonds, it is difficult to say precisely how much debt is tied just to Giants Stadium.

But George R. Zoffinger, the chief executive of the authority until 2007, says that there is roughly $110 million in debt on the stadium. About $75 million in debt remains for the Izod Center, which lost its two anchor tenants, the Devils and the Nets, in recent years. The rest was tied to the racetrack.

The finances of public authorities are often murky. To determine that the RCA Dome in Indianapolis, which was demolished in 2008, has $61 million in debt remaining and will not be paid off until 2021, one must sift through 700 pages of bond documents.

With more than four decades of evidence to back them up, economists almost uniformly agree that publicly financed stadiums rarely pay for themselves. The notable successes like Camden Yards in Baltimore often involve dedicated taxes or large infusions of private money. Even then, using one tax to finance a stadium can often steer spending away from other, perhaps worthier, projects.

“Stadiums are sold as enormous draws for events, but the economics are clear that they aren’t helping,” said Andrew Moylan, the director of government affairs at the National Taxpayers Union. “It’s another way to add insult to injury for taxpayers.”

No Quick Solutions

Some politicians in New Jersey applaud the Jets and the Giants for building their own stadium. But the old Giants Stadium generated about $20 million a year for the authority. Now, the agency will receive only $6.3 million in lease payments from the teams, and needs additional state subsidies.

The authority has promoted Xanadu, a privately built retail complex that has yet to open next to the Izod Center. But desperate to plug holes, the authority has spent the entire $160 million in rent payments it received from the developers. Some of the money was meant to pay off debt associated with the arena and the stadium, and was supposed to last 15 years.

During hearings in Trenton this year, Dennis Robinson, the president of the authority, said the sports complex generated tens of millions of dollars a year for the state from its facilities and in associated economic benefits. But the continued erosion of receipts at the racetrack and the loss of a football stadium have diminished the authority, which has laid off nearly half its full-time staff since 2002.

Eager to cut the state’s losses, Gov. Chris Christie in July endorsed proposals to lease the Izod Center and the racetrack in the Meadowlands to outside operators. But Gov. Christie was less precise about how the state would pay off the authority’s bonds, including those issued to pay for Giants Stadium.

“Believe me, I’m not unaware of the debt situation that was left here in my lap by decisions made by previous administrations,” Gov. Christie said, speaking from the 50-yard line at New Meadowlands Stadium. “But we’re just going to have to deal with it.”

Jo Craven McGinty and Griff Palmer contributed reporting.

Copyright 2010 The New York Times Company

T.DEE
January 24th, 2012, 06:08 PM
A couple shots of the old stadium coming down in June of 2010

14800

14801

14802

NYatKNIGHT
February 29th, 2012, 12:53 AM
I've grown to dislike the new stadium. Obviously I don't have the luxury seats, I'm sure those people are thrilled. I'm up in the upper deck where I've been for 27 years. It now takes three escalators and weaving through the crowds to get up there, it used to take just one. No improvement in the bathroom lines either. Parking is more expensive and a huge hassle if you don't have the pass. The stadium is all exposed pipes, gray paint, and bare bones. And the PSL's! Plus my seats are farther away because the stadium is bigger. I also miss smoking cigars on the spirals at half time. And it's not Giants Stadium anymore, it's not Our House, it's MetLife Stadium for chrissake with the Jets. Because the Giants won the Super Bowl they should at least get to call it Giants Stadium until the Jets win. ;) Video screens are bigger, true, but from my perspective the stadium is no better than before just more expensive.

mariab
February 29th, 2012, 03:03 PM
Sad to here that. It does look more industrial on the outside. Maybe the conveniences were made for the team & the VIPs. Bathrooms & escalators would have been in the top three on the list of fans' concerns, second to seating.

I just noticed in those pics above they left that Bud Light sign up til the last minute. Jeez I'm sure their sales wouldn't have suffered that much if they took it down first.